San Mateo

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San Mateo (#) (-)



In the News~

March 29, 1881 [LAH]: “Arrived, March 23, schooner San Mateo, Sylvia, master, 24 hours from San Clemente with wool for Polaski & Co.”


April 12, 1881 [LAH]: “Arrived, April 7th, schooner San Mateo, Sylvia, master, twelve hours from San Clemente Island, with passengers and wool.”


April 10, 1891 [LAT]: “Schooner San Mateo, Sylvia, from Clemente Island, 200 sheep to Los Angeles Slaughtering Co.”


May 3, 1891 [LAT]: “Arrived—May 2, schooner San Mateo, Gonzales, from Clemente Island, 210 sheep to S. C. Hubbell.”


May 9, 1891 [LAT]: “From Catalina Island, sheep, to S. C. Hubbell, May 7, schooner San Mateo, Sylvia, from Clemente Island, 20 tons wool, to S. P. Co.”


May 14, 1891 [LAT]: “Schooner San Mateo, Gonzales, from San Clemente Island, eight tons wool to S. C. Hubbell.”


December 18, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Mr. Stevens, upon arriving at San Pedro from San Clemente, after his own vessel, the Ruby, was wrecked, chartered the schooner San Mateo of that place, and brought his load of 300 sacks of shells, arriving here Friday evening. The San Mateo is a boat schooner rigged about the same size as the Ruby. Messrs. Stevens and Clark have purchased the vessel, and sent Captain Libbey and young Nidever down to San Pedro where the transfer of ownership will be made. They will bring the vessel back, and it will be run in the island trade by the new owners.”


December 22, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Ed Stevens, with the schooner San Mateo, returned from San Pedro Monday. His next trip will be to San Nicolas Island for shells. He is trying to make a contract to catch red fish in quantities. For the present, the San Mateo will ply between the islands and this city.”


January 13, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo came over yesterday from San Nicolas Island bringing a load of abalone shells.”


January 15, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo left yesterday afternoon for San Nicolas Island for a cargo of abalone shells.”


January 27, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo came in Wednesday night from San Nicolas Island with four hundred sacks of shells.”


February 7, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo came in Sunday night from San Clemente Island with a cargo of twelve or fifteen tons of abalone shells.”


February 11, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo got up sail yesterday afternoon and started for Anacapa Islands for a cargo of abalone shells.”


February 12, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo has been trying for the last couple of days to start for the islands, but there was not sufficient wind blowing to enable her to get out beyond the kelp.”


February 17, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo sailed for Santa Cruz Island to gather abalones.”


March 15, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo came in on Monday night after a three weeks cruise among the islands in search of abalone shells.”


March 26, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo came in from Anacapa Island yesterday morning and dropped anchor at 11 o’clock.”


March 28, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo arrived in the harbor Sunday from the islands. Extensive repairs will be made on the boat before she sails again.”


April 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo returned from Santa Rosa Island yesterday from a trip to the old Goldenhorn wreck.”


April 6, 1893 [LAT]: “The schooner San Mateo left for the islands Monday morning for the purpose of bringing in some live seals.”


April 22, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo came in on Friday morning from Santa Rosa Island bringing live seals and some abalones and other shells. The seals are to be shipped to the East. One of them died soon after landing from injuries received in boxing him. He was a very handsome specimen.”


April 23, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo left for the islands yesterday afternoon.”


May 5, 1893 [SBMP]: “The sloop San Mateo is in from the islands with a cargo of abalone shells.”


May 13, 1893 [SBMP]: “The sloop San Mateo is in from the islands.”


May 14, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop San Mateo is in from the islands with a cargo of abalone shells and abalones.”


June 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo arrived in the harbor last evening, the first time for several weeks. Her cargo consisted of oil, etc., the result of an extended seal hunt.”


July 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and San Mateo, and the sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning.”


July 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo leaves tomorrow morning for Anacapa Island with a party of about 30 young people on pleasure bent.”


July 12, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “A party consisting of Edmond Burke, Frank Burke, Walter Hardy, Harmon Packard and Misses Garfield, Miss Coggins and others will leave Tuesday by the sloop San Mateo for Anacapa Island to stay about ten days.”


July 13, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo departed for the islands Tuesday morning... Yesterday at ten o'clock the San Mateo lay off Goleta waiting for the breeze that blew a few hours later...”


July 22, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo is still at the islands with a party of Good Templars and their friends. The schooner is expected back next week.”


July 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo arrived last evening from the islands with a large party of campers. They had a delightful time; the return trip was very smooth and there was little or no seasickness among the passengers. The San Mateo reports that they met the Restless about midway in the channel. The members of the party were having a jolly time.”


August 8, 1893 [SBDI]: “The San Mateo took a large party for a sail in the channel yesterday afternoon.”


August 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “This morning the San Mateo started for the islands. She will return in a few days with a cargo of abalone shells.”


October 9, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo, Captain Ellis, which a week age was reported lost, has arrived in port. She has been otter hunting up the coast, and has not been near any means of communication for some time.”


October 11, 1893 [SBDI]: “W. I. Cummings has returned from a trip to the islands. He has been absent two weeks and he brings back two very valuable skins of the sea otter obtained by Bob Ord's hunting party now on an expedition among the islands with the schooner San Mateo...”


October 20, 1893 [SBDI]: “A party of seal hunters will leave in about a week for the islands to get sea lions for the exhibit in San Francisco during the fair.”


October 28, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo arrived last night from the islands where for the past two months the crew, under direction of Bob Ord, have been hunting otter. They report bad weather, a strong wind blowing steadily around the islands. Of the weeks spent in the channel, they had only a few hours of hunting weather. During this time they secured only two or three skins.”


November 8, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo has gone to Anacapa Island.”


November 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “A gasoline schooner is expected from San Pedro soon to go to the islands on a seal hunt to obtain specimens for the San Francisco Fair.”


December 25, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island for another catch of seals to go in the Midwinter Amphibia. Ramon Vasquez and Joe Espinosa are aboard with a party of hunters. The latter will be left on the island while the San Mateo goes south for an overhauling and repainting. It will probably be two weeks before she returns to this port.”


December 27, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo, with a party of seal hunters on board, left for the islands on Monday morning. The seal hunters will be left on Santa Cruz Island while the San Mateo goes to San Pedro for an overhauling and repainting. The instructions are to catch none but the very largest seals and sea lions for the Midwinter Fair Amphibia exhibit.”


February 3, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo was at the wharf yesterday discharging a cargo of ten tons of gravel brought over from the islands.”


March 2, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo has gone to San Miguel Island.”


March 29, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo, which has been to San Miguel Island on another hunt, returned the other day without any otters, but with one seal, which will be sent to the Santa Barbara Amphibia on the steamer Eureka. The San Mateo left again yesterday for Santa Cruz Island on another sailing expedition.”


April 9, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo left today for San Miguel Island and Point Sur on an otter hunting expedition.”


May 9, 1894 [SBDI]: “The San Mateo has gone to San Miguel Island with a sealing party. Ed Stevens is at its head.”


May 20, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Ed Stevens of the sloop San Mateo related a tale of a lonely fisherman, known here only as ‘Fatty,’ whom he discovered on Flea Island, a rock a little to the west of San Miguel Island. ‘Fatty’ was one of the Ord party, who left here on a sealing expedition in the Big Loafer, and was left on Flea Island, while the rest of the party came back here. They intended to return for him immediately, but were detained here by the charge of larceny of the Big Loafer, and ‘Fatty’ had to suffer all sorts of hardships, which Captain Stevens tells in a thrilling manner.”


May 24, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo is at San Miguel Island. The return of Captain Ed Stevens with more harrowing tales of the sea, is awaited with pleasure.”


June 6, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo and sloop Liberty have left for the islands.”


June 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “Eight seals for the fair were brought over from the islands by the San Mateo and shipped north last night.”


June 11, 1894 [SNDI]: “The schooner San Mateo sailed for the islands this morning.”


June 22, 1894 [SBMP]: “The San Mateo is in the harbor from the islands.”


June 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo goes to San Pedro in a few days for repairs.”


July 17, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo returned last night from San Pedro where she has been undergoing repairs.”


July 18, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo, which has been at San Pedro for sometime past undergoing repairs, returned here last night.”


July 18, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo left last night for the islands to bring back a party of campers.”


July 19, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo has gone to the islands after a party that is now seal hunting on San Miguel.”


July 24, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo sailed this morning for San Miguel island where she will get a party of sea hunters and return to Santa Barbara.”


July 24, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner San Mateo has returned from San Miguel Island.”


July 25, 1894 [SBMP]: “The San Mateo has gone to Santa Cruz Island.”


July 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “Two new anchors are expected to arrive on the steamer Mexico tomorrow for the schooner San Mateo, she having lost her anchors on her last voyage.”


July 31, 1894 [SBDI]: “Two anchors arrived on the steamer Eureka from San Francisco last night for the schooner San Mateo, and today she sailed for San Miguel Island to bring over the seal hunting party whom she was compelled to abandon during the storm.”


August 6, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo arrived Saturday evening from San Miguel Island with the sealing party. They made a very small catch on this trip.”


August 7, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo has returned from San Miguel Island with the party of seal hunters who report a very small catch.”


August 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo is being fitted out for an otter hunting expedition.”


August 9, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo is being fitted out for another hunting expedition up the coast.”


September 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “A rumor was circulated in town today to the effect that the schooner San Mateo, Captain Ellis, which sailed from here some time ago on an otter hunting expedition, had been lost with the entire party. The rumor was not confirmed, however.”


October 1, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “Considerable anxiety was caused here by the report that the San Mateo was lost, but the story was undoubtedly the invention of some over imaginative person. One of the crew telegraphed from White Rock that he had left the schooner some two weeks before, and had not since heard anything from her, which was probably the basis on which the report was founded.”


October 1, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “A report was current here this morning that the schooner San Mateo, which left this port some time ago with Captain Ellis and a party of otter hunters, had been wrecked and sunk with all on board. When traced up, however, the story seemed to have no foundation, and is likely to be only a hoax. As yet those most interested have been unable to get any confirmation.”


October 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo, which was reported to be lost a little over a week ago, arrived in the harbor this morning.”


October 17, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Achilles, which arrived in the harbor some time ago, has passed into the possession of Captain Ellis and Hiram Pierce. It is stated that the San Mateo was traded for Achilles, and that the latter will be used for otter hunting, for which purpose she was built. She is a much larger vessel than the San Mateo and is a new boat.”


October 19, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo, Captain Bartels, was to leave today for Wilmington, where she will be overhauled and necessary repairs made.”


October 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Achilles, the new schooner recently purchased by Captain Ellis, is outfitting for an otter hunting trip around the islands and up the coast. On his last trip Captain Ellis in the schooner San Mateo captured ten otter, and having done so well is preparing to go in on a larger scale. The Achilles is a fine new two-masted schooner, 44 tons burden, and a speedy and safe craft. She will carry a crew of fourteen men besides the captain. Four boats will be used in hunting, each boat carrying a hunter and two men. On the last trip in the San Mateo, two small boat’s crews were lost from the schooner in a fog, but after a pull of 30 miles they made the mainland and lay three days and three nights without food until picked up by the captain. The Achilles will be ready for sea by the middle of next week when she will leave for the hunting grounds for the winter.”


October 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner San Mateo sailed yesterday for San Pedro, where some repairs will be made and her clearance papers changed.”


November 11, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty expected to sail today for San Nicolas Island to get some spotted sea lions for the Midwinter Fair Exhibit. Five men constituted the crew, and Herbert Rogers was to be in charge.”


October 9, 1894 [SBMP]: “Captain Ellis of the San Mateo, who left here some weeks ago on an otter hunting trip, returned Sunday from a most successful hunt, nine splendid skins being the result of his days on the sea. Captain reports heavy seas and sloppy weather.”


October 20, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Achilles was tied up to the wharf this morning, discharging her cargo of four-foot pine wood, which she brought from Washington. The schooner Achilles has become a fixture of this city. Captain Ellis having traded the schooner San Mateo for her. She will be used for otter hunting, for which purpose she was built. She is a much larger vessel than the San Mateo and is a comparatively new boat.”


October 20, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner San Mateo, Captain Bartels, was expected to leave today for Wilmington where she will undergo a thorough repairing.”