Santa Cruz (schooner)

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Schooner Santa Cruz (1893-1960) under sail.
Schooner Santa Cruz
Schooner Santa Cruz grounded at Rincon, 1913
Schooner Santa Cruz, 1929
Schooner Santa Cruz, August 1960


Santa Cruz (#116559) (1893-1960) [schooner], wood two masted supply schooner built in Benicia, California by the famous shipwright, Matthew Turner [1] for Justinian Caire and the Santa Cruz Island Company. Launched on May 9, 1893, she was 64 feet in length with an 18.6-foot beam. She served the island for 67 years, hauling sheep-shearers, grape-pickers and supplies to the island, and island products including walnuts, almonds, wine, grapes, wool, and sheep to mainland markets. On September 13, 1913 the schooner ran aground in a heavy fog , with George Nidever at the helm, at Rincon, near the Santa Barbara—Ventura county line. She remained foundered for more than three months, until December 18, when, after remarkable efforts, she was refloated and repaired at San Pedro. When the island was partitioned and the western 9/10ths sold to Edwin L. Stanton in 1937, she was included in the sale as part of the inventory of the Santa Cruz Island Company. During her years of service, she underwent several structural modifications. Some of her well known local captains included:

On December 6, 1960 while anchored at Prisoners’ Harbor, the Santa Cruz parted her mooring and was wrecked on the rocks on the west side of the harbor. Some of her parts, including compass, anchor chain and cowl vents were salvaged. For over half a century the local papers reported on her activities.



In the News~

March 25, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “A new gasoline launch will soon be going between Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz Island.”


March 26, 1893 [SBMP]: “Forty-five sheep shearers left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday on the schooner Star of Freedom. The shearing will take six weeks. The new superintendent of the islands went in charge. The captain of the schooner Star of Freedom received a telegram to await further orders and then leave for San Francisco to take command of the new gasoline schooner [Santa Cruz] purchased by the Santa Cruz Island Company. The boat will arrive here some time this week.”


May 17, 1893 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner for the Santa Cruz Island Company is expected to arrive here the last of the week.”


May 19, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The new gasoline engine steam schooner purchased by Justinian Caire for the Santa Cruz Island trade, is expected here tomorrow.”


May 28, 1893 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner recently purchased by the Santa Cruz Island Company is expected at this port every day.”


June 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz arrived in harbor Sunday night from San Francisco, which port she left Saturday morning. The Santa Cruz is the vessel recently built for Justinian Caire for the coasting trade between Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz Island, and the island and San Francisco. She is forty-three tons burden, sixty-four feet in length, eighteen feet beam, and has a forty-four horse power gasoline engine. Captain John Revello is in command. The trip from San Francisco was made without break or accident, and was entirely satisfactory, the Santa Cruz proving herself to be a safe vessel, with good speed. Everything about her is new and clean. It is satisfactory to know that the business of the Santa Cruz Island Company has expanded to such an extent to render the building of such a vessel necessary. Mr. Justinian Caire and family were expected to arrive on the Corona from San Francisco this afternoon, in which case they would leave on the Santa Cruz tonight for the island.”


June 27, 1893 [SBDI]: “The local authorities on seamanship, sailing, vessels, and the like, have been in a deep study all day, trying to discover the correct meaning of a ‘twin craft,’ such as the Santa Cruz was described as being in this morning’s paper. Several different probable meanings have been suggested, but whether or not the true inwardness of the matter has been reached is uncertain. Will the nautical editor of the Press please enlighten an anxious public? Did he mean that the Santa Cruz has twin screws; or that she has a twin sister, or what?


June 27, 1893 [SBDI]: “The new steam schooner Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island this morning, having on board Mrs. Caire and a party of ladies and gentlemen.”


June 28, 1893 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with the following party aboard: Mrs. J. Caire, Miss Aglae Caire, Miss Helene Caire, Miss María Rossi, Miss Adelaide Rossi, John Drum, Miss Cassie Drum, Miss Sara Drum, and Miss Madeline Rosseter. The party will spend several weeks on the island and return here for a few week's stay later in the season.”


June 28, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Justinian Caire, manager of Santa Cruz Island, came in on the Corona Monday night. The Santa Cruz, the new schooner built for the Santa Cruz Island people, arrived in port Monday in charge of Captain Revello. She will ply between here and the island.”


June 28, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz for the islands this morning with the following people who will remain about two months: Mrs. J. Caire, Miss Aglae Caire, Miss Helene Caire, Miss María Rossi, Miss Adelaide Rossi, Mrs. John Drum, Mrs. Cassie Drum, Miss Sarah Drum, Miss Madeline Rossiter.”


July 2, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa and the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz are expected over from the islands today. The Santa Cruz is returning from a trip on which she took Mr. Caire, family and friends, who expected to remain some time on the island.”


July 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz has returned from her first trip to the island. She has proved a success and is able to steam nine knots an hour.”


July 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz returned to the island yesterday.”


July 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooners Santa Rosa, San Mateo, and the sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning. The Santa Cruz returned to the island yesterday.”


July 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with 150 sheep.”


July 12, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island Sunday night with 160 sheep on beard.”


July 18, 1893 [SBDI]: “The gasoline steamer Santa Cruz arrived this morning from the island with sheep.”


July 24, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is in the harbor, to remain over Sunday.”


August 16, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz naphtha boat arrived from the island yesterday with a lot of sheep for Sherman & Ealand. One of the animals got overboard and made things quite lively for a few moments, to get the critter out again.”


August 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz Island affair now the topic of conversation.”


August 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “Both justice courts claim the Santa Cruz Island case — Judge Gammill will interview the men on next Tuesday and Judge Crane will consider their case on Wednesday.”


August 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “There is a case that will come before our courts shortly that calls for the best legal talent. It is well known that Justinian Caire of San Francisco, has been the owner of Santa Cruz Island for many years. As he expressed it to the writer months ago, ‘I have bought the property with my own money as a heritage to my children. I have spent a great deal in the way of improvements and love to go there myself, and enjoy the quiet place. It is my property and I do not wish to be molested by strangers. Camping parties have invaded my rights, killed my stock, burned my trees, destroyed my improvements and annoyed me in many ways.’ The law, as we are informed, gives the space between high and low water to the people. No one can own that. On the rocks which surround this island grow thousands and tens of thousands of abalone. They are a shellfish and also belong to the people. No one can own them. But, in order to gather them, a person must infringe on the property rights of Mr. Caire. They must use his shores for drying or preserving their meat and cleaning the shells, which are worth $40 per ton at wholesale. A few weeks ago, some men went to the island, gathered a lot of abalone, dried the meat and sacked it and got it ready for shipment, all on Mr. Caire’s land. Captain Burtis went after the men and their goods as per agreement. It was found that the boat could not touch the land at the spot where the fish lay, so the men began to transport it to Surprise Harbor. While engaged in taking the last load there, the Santa Cruz, a gasoline boat belonging to the island, confiscated the whole lot of goods. For this, several arrests have been made, and it is on this account that the nice legal talent will be required. It is a question of great interest to the people of this city who consider it a hardship not to be allowed to go to and from the island, camp there as much as they wish and appropriate firewood, shoot the birds and seals to their heart’s content. Until very lately, Mr. Caire has been very indulgent, but he seems to consider it time to take a firm hand in the matter, and has already ordered away several parties who have landed on the island. The above facts as we learn them and they are given by us with no prejudice to any one, reserving to the majesty of the law the whole trial of the case. We have only intended to give a statement of facts with no opinion either way.”


August 31, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “There is trouble on the island kingdom of President Justinian Caire of the Santa Cruz Island Company. It appears that Mr. Caire has had his son on the island as superintendent, and that there is considerable pains being taken to discourage people from landing thereon. Two young men from this city, R. Vasquez and Manuel Alves, have been on the island since July 15 gathering abalone shells and abalones from the rocks and cliffs on the north side. They had collected fifteen sacks of abalone meat and twelve sacks of shells, and on the 24th began taking them to Surprise Harbor, where the schooner Restless was to come and take the boys and their load to this port. It proved to be a surprise harbor for them, for when they were bringing their last load in the skiff from Lady Harbor, they saw the gasoline launch Santa Cruz leaving in a hurried manner, and on following her in a skiff, found that she had taken their stuff on board. They went to the superintendent, but he would give them no satisfaction and ordered them away. Saturday they swore to a complaint charging young Mr. Caire and the steam schooner’s captain with theft, and Constable Dan Dover left for Santa Cruz Island on the Restless Sunday with the intention of arresting the two men.”


September 1, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The constable, Dan Dover, came back from the islands Wednesday night, and announced that Mr. Caire and the captain of the gasoline schooner at Santa Cruz, whom he went over to arrest, had steamed out of the harbor on the gasoline boat, and beat the Restless over, defying his attempts to arrest them. They were arrested here and released on their own recognizance. They returned to the island Thursday.”


September 1, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The constable, Dan Dover, came back from the islands Wednesday night, and announced that Mr. Caire and the captain of the gasoline schooner at Santa Cruz, whom he went over to arrest, had steamed out of the harbor on the gasoline boat, and beat the Restless over, defying his attempts to arrest them. They were arrested here and released on their own recognizance. They returned to the island Thursday.”


September 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz Island suits have been settled to the mutual satisfaction of all and the case taken from court. It was the result of a misunderstanding that the affair took place. This is better for all and cheaper for all.”


September 14, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz is in from the islands.”


September 25, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz is in from Santa Cruz Island. A load of lambs is expected over from San Miguel.”


September 29, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Cruz is in from the island of that name, having brought over Justinian Caire and family.”


October 6, 1893 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz and the schooner Santa Rosa, returned to the islands today.”


October 18, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from the island.”


November 2, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz has returned to the islands.”


November 8, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned to the islands yesterday.”


November 13, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Cruz left for the islands Saturday.”


November 16, 1893 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz is in the harbor receiving some repairs to her machinery.”


November 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from across the channel.”


December 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for the island Saturday with about fifty sheep shearers.”


January 6, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned to the island on its regular trip yesterday.”


January 17, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the islands yesterday.”


February 25, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the island yesterday.”


April 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner from Santa Cruz Island brought over fifteen tons of abalones and twelve tons of shells the latter part of last week.”


April 16, 1894 [SBDI]: “Justinian Caire, owner of Santa Cruz Island, arrived Sunday from San Francisco with a party. They took the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz for the island, leaving yesterday afternoon.”


April 18, 1894 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz returned to the island this morning.”


April 19, 1894 [SBMP]: “Justinian Caire and family left on the schooner Santa Cruz yesterday for their island home.”


April 23, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa and sloop Liberty arrived today from the islands. The Santa Cruz also came in with Deputy Assessor J. L Barker and party on board.”


May 3, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in last night with a party of fifty sheep shearers.”


May 3, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz brought fifty sheep shearers over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday where they were at work for the past month.”


May 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz landed 150 sheep at the wharf yesterday for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned to the island yesterday.”


May 15, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived this afternoon from the island.”


May 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island yesterday with over 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 26, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz brought over 157 head of sheep for Sherman & Ealand yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


June 1, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the islands yesterday with a cargo of sheep.”


June 2, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz went to the island again yesterday.”


June 2, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is in the harbor from the islands.”


June 13, 1893 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived in the harbor yesterday from the island.”


June 22, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived in the bay from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


June 24, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday afternoon from the islands.”


June 26, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz has left for the islands.”


June 28, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is in from the islands.”


June 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, and returned today with furniture for use there.”


June 29, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from the islands yesterday afternoon.”


June 30, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 200 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 30, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sails for the island today.”


July 3, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Jim Prescott, arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 6, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Prescott, is at anchor in the harbor.”


July 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 11, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port last evening from the island. Owing to a break in some of the machinery, she was compelled to run over under sail, and is now in the harbor making repairs.”


July 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner, Santa Cruz, returned from the island this afternoon with a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 12, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port today from Santa Cruz Island. Owing to some break in her machinery she will be laid up some time for repairs.”


July 13, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 110 sheep for Sherman & Ealand. Mr. Sherman came with the load.”


July 14, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from the island yesterday with a cargo consisting of several casks of wine, the product of the island vineyard.”


July 25, 1894 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz is in the harbor.”


July 27, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the island yesterday.”


July 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the islands yesterday.”


July 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in last night from the islands with 149 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 1, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island yesterday afternoon.”


August 2, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the island last evening.”


August 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with five barrels of wine.”


August 7, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in from the island of that name yesterday.”


August 10, 1894 [SBDI]: The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


August 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz has gone to Santa Cruz Island.”


August 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned from a trip to the islands last night.”


August 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed last night for the islands.”


September 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island last night.”


October 2, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 24, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz brought some horses from the island yesterday for ‘Nesimos Covarrubias. A small crown gathered to watch them unload.”


October 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came over from the islands yesterday.”


October 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 24, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with several horses. A large number of people gathered to see them unloaded, which was done by throwing them overboard and making them swim ashore.”


October 31, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday on one of her regular trips from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 1, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed today for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 16, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 22, 1894 [SBMP]: “The viable supply of Thanksgiving provenders has been largely increased by a cargo of chickens, ducks and turkeys brought over by the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz.”


November 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline yacht Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island taking a party consisting of Justinian Caire, three other gentlemen and two ladies from San Francisco.”


November 25, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island and returned there this morning with Justinian Caire and a party of friends who came down from San Francisco yesterday.”


November 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


December 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline yacht Santa Cruz returned today to Santa Cruz Island.”


December 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived in the city yesterday afternoon with a small consignment of wine.”


December 13, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


December 14, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for the islands yesterday.”


December 21, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 31, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed last night for Santa Cruz Island.”


March 20, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz from Prisoners’ Harbor is in port.”


April 9, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from the island.”


May 10, 1895 [SBDI]: “The gasoline yacht Santa Cruz is in the harbor.”


May 25, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island with 191 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 20, 1895 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left about four o’clock yesterday for the island. The captain says that he intended to obtain permission from Mr. Caire, owner of the boat, to go up to Quava [Cueva] Valdez as soon as he reached home.”


July 29, 1895 [SBDI]: “The islands’ boats Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz were both in harbor yesterday.”


August 10, 1895 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the Island yesterday afternoon, bringing the news of the death of Angelo Forno, stableman. Forno was out with a party last Sunday night for a ride, and on coming home his horse shied and ran into a gate. The rider was thrown about thirty feet, the fall breaking his neck. Death was instantaneous. An inquest was held, finding that his death was accidental as stated. He was buried on the island. Forno was 42 years old, and leaves a widow and three children in Italy. He had been on the island about two years.”


September 1, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The three boats which regularly ply between Santa Barbara and the islands, the Santa Cruz, the gasoline launch belonging to Justinian Caire… All came in yesterday afternoon.”


September 17, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is in from Justinian Caire’s island ranch.”


January 28, 1896 [SFCall]: “The channel was so rough this morning that the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, belonging to Justinian Caire and plying between Santa Barbara and the island, which left port, was obliged to turn back.”


March 21, 1896 [LAT/SP]: “Vessel movements. March 17, gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, Captain James G. Prescott, from Santa Cruz Island with 2663 gallons of wine.”


June 8, 1896 [SBDI]: “Saturday night the sloop Genoa lay at her anchor near the wharf with provisions on board sufficient for six men for a month. She was to make sail early the following morning for Santa Cruz Island with a party of sealers engaged by Captain Mullett, and her stores had been put aboard preparatory to an early start. When the crew arrived Sunday morning the Genoa was missing and Mr. A. Larco, her owner, at once began preparations for a thorough search of the coast nearby. The naptha boat Santa Cruz was chartered and started towards the islands while Mr. Jean Larco in La Paloma cruised along the channel to the westward. It was very foggy, but when the fog lifted, off Naples the stolen boat was overtaken. Her occupant, Louis Olivas, made no resistance and was brought to shore at Naples by Deputy Sheriff P. S. Wood. His accomplice had become frightened and gone ashore in a small boat. The fog had confused Olivas who is not much of a sailor and he had simply drifted about in the fog — hence the easy and early capture. He was lodged in the jail on a charge of grand larceny in “stealing a boat valued at $400 lawful money of the United States, the property of A. Larco.” His examination has not yet been set by Judge Gammill. His associate will probably be “gathered in” today.”


June 30, 1896 [LAT/LB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Prescott, anchored off the pier Sunday morning for an hour, and as no one came ashore a Times reporter rowed out to her, where he was courteously received by Captain Prescott. The vessel had on board a cargo of wine which she had brought down from Santa Cruz Island, consigned to a Los Angeles liquor house, but the boat could not get dockage at San Pedro, so she was simply making a pleasure trip around the bay, with some friends of the captain. Aside from sail, the vessel carries a forty-horse-power engine, which makes her a swift craft regardless of adverse winds. She also has full electrical appliances, and all the more modern furnishings.”


July 28, 1896 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in today from the island of the same name with a cargo of wine.”


November 22, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday with 1200 sacks of potatoes from Lompoc.”


June 10, 1897 [SBMP]: “Captain Maggiolo of the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, left with his vessel yesterday afternoon for San Pedro, where he will take out his engine and she will heed hereafter as a sailboat, plying between Santa Barbara and the islands.”


March 7, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from Santa Cruz Island with eight hundred sacks of abalone shells and the Restless arrived from San Nicolas Island with three hundred sacks of the same freight.”


May 4, 1898 [LAT/SP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, arrived Monday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of wine.”


June 22, 1898 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, came in yesterday morning from the island.”


October 2, 1898 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz is again in service on the line between Santa Cruz Island and Santa Barbara, after two months in San Francisco Bay having undergone repairs.”


April 15, 1899 [SBMP]: “The gasoline launch Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island last night and left this morning for the same place with forty sheep shearers.”


August 10, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon bringing over the mail. She will return tomorrow.”


August 16, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, left yesterday for the island, taking 6000 feet of lumber for improvements Mr. Caire contemplates building.”


September 27, 1899 [SBDI]: “The island schooner Santa Rosa was taking on a cargo of lumber for Captain Waters at San Miguel Island, and the gasoline launch Santa Cruz was loading with freight for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 6, 1899 [SBMP]: “The gasoline yacht Santa Cruz arrived here yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with sixty barrels of wine.”


November 15, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The gravest fears are expressed here for the safety of the schooner Santa Cruz, which runs between this port and Santa Cruz Island, carrying provisions to the island sheepherders. The boat has been overdue since last Thursday. So far, there is no news of her, and she has not been sighted on the channel. Her captain had an agreement with Cyril Wigmore of Los Angeles to stop here on Thursday and take Wigmore over to the island on Friday. Wigmore was to spend a week there looking over the minerals on the island. But no boat came on Thursday, and this afternoon the vessel had not been seen. Mr. Wigmore says that his agreement was such that there could have been no misunderstanding. Island sailing boats are often delayed by winds or heavy weather, but it is not unusual for them to be so long overdue.”


November 16, 1899 [LAT/SP]: “The little schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, which is reported as having been overdue at Santa Barbara since last week Thursday, sailed from here on that date. No one here appears to know where was her destination. Inasmuch as several days might be consumed in making the passage from this port to Santa Barbara by way of the islands, it is thought the anxiety at that port over her long absence is greater than is warranted.”


November 18, 1899 [LAT/SP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which was reported as overdue at Santa Barbara, is safe at this port. The little vessel sailed from here last week for Santa Cruz Island, and got a cargo of wine. She returned from that island, and arrived here Thursday evening. It appears that by some misunderstanding, she was expected to put into Santa Barbara, but did not do so.”


November 21, 1899 [LAT/SP]: “Sailed. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 12, 1900 [LAT]: “A Spanish man employed on the schooner Santa Cruz was lost overboard while the vessel was near San Miguel Island on the 8th inst.”


January 24, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the islands this morning.”


February 1, 1900 [SBDI]:Santa Cruz leaves for the islands tomorrow.”


February 21, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the islands this morning.”


March 6, 1900 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz and Dawn also arrived Sunday from the islands.”


March 9, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “A cargo of 300 fine spring lambs from the Channel Islands was unloaded from the schooner Santa Cruz.”


March 30, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 40 or 50 sheep shearers.”


April 16, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned from Santa Rosa Island last night.”


April 17, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned from the islands Sunday night with a cargo of beef cattle for Sherman & Ealand which she discharged.”


April 28, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday bringing over 250 head of sheep.”


May 17, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday, taking over a gang of sheep shearers.”


May 17, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived here yesterday, bringing 250 sheep from one of the Channel Islands. The sheep are fat and in excellent condition. There has been much more rain across the channel than here, and feed is in excellent shape. Shearers are still at work on the island flocks, having 2000 or more sheep to clip.”


June 4, 1900 [LAT/VC]: “The schooner Santa Cruz brought in a cargo of wine from Santa Cruz Island.”


June 11, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


July 17, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 18, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, arriving from Santa Cruz Island Monday with Mr. Caire, returned yesterday to the island.”


August 16, 1900 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz is in port from the islands.”


August 24, 1900 [SBMP]: “Channel skippers all say that rough weather prevails on the opposite side. The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, brought over a cargo of abalones yesterday and will return shortly for more from the west side of Santa Cruz Island.”


August 30, 1900 [SBWP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, brought over a cargo of abalones yesterday and will return shortly for more from the west side of Santa Cruz Island.”


September 6, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, sails today for Santa Cruz Island for a cargo of wine which will be shipped to inland markets from San Pedro.”


September 6, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, sails for a cargo of wine, which will be discharged for inland shipment at San Pedro.”


September 11, 1900 [LAT/SP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain E. Maggiolo, arrived from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of 6745 gallons of wine consigned to A. B. Roth of Los Angeles.”


September 21, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in late last night, reporting the weather on the other side of the channel very squally, which is considered an indication of early winter storms.”


September 22, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from the islands reporting exceedingly rough weather on the other side of the channel.”


September 22, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned to the island today.”


September 22, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from the island late last evening. Captain Maggiolo thinks the squally season has begun, as he encountered heavy west sou’west winds in the channel, and an east wind as he neared the mainland.”


October 2, 1900 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning with 15 tons of abalone shells and four Chinamen from the camp on Santa Cruz Island.”


October 3, 1900 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from the islands, bringing over tons of abalone shells and four Chinamen from the Chinese fishing camps.”


October 3, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from the island, bringing off the four Chinese abalone fishers, who have spent the summer there. Her cargo consisted of fifteen tons of abalone shells.”


November 23, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last evening from the island, the captain reporting rough weather across the channel.”


November 24, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the islands yesterday. The Captain reports very rough weather across the channel.”


November 24, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for the island today with several laborers and Chinamen.”


November 25, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left yesterday for the islands taking a number of laborers and Chinamen.”


January 7, 1901 [SBDI]: “The gasoline launch Santa Cruz arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island. Heavy fall of rain at the island is reported.”


January 12, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “A Spanish man [Felix Botiller] employed on the schooner Santa Cruz was lost overboard while the vessel was near San Miguel Island on the 3rd inst.”


January 21, 1901 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 23, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


February 8, 1901 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 1, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


March 14, 1901 [LAT/SP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, came into this port Saturday from Santa Cruz Island with 4684 gallons of wine.”


March 15, 1901 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


March 18, 1901 [SBDI]: “A rumor was afloat last evening and today that the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, which sailed several days ago from this port, had been lost with all on board; also that a searching party had gone out to investigate and returned with the news that a large wine barrel from the schooner had been found in the channel and that the vessel was several days overdue at the island. Investigation proved that there was absolutely no grounds for the rumor, and that it was started by several little wharf rats. A telephone from San Pedro to The Independent states that the Santa Cruz is there undergoing repairs.”


April 10, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last evening from the island with a cargo of wool. She came into port with power, without the aid of her canvas.”


May 9, 1901 [SBMP]: The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, sailed yesterday with a number of sheep shearers for the J. Caire estate. The shearers’ union finally made its peace with the foreman, Carlo Erbetti, and returned to work.”


May 9, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left this morning for the island with a band of sheep shearers aboard, after a number of difficulties between the men and their employers had been patched up. Some weeks ago the shearers, in the employ of Carlo Erbetti, foreman of the J. Caire estate, formed the ‘Santa Cruz Shearers Union,’ to protest against their treatment. They claimed that they were hired by Erbetti at 50 cents per day in excess of regular shearing wages, and $1 per day for working as vaqueros, and doing general work on the ranch. When they were taken to the island, however, they were compelled to sweep the corrals, and perform other menial duties which they deemed out of the contract, and were paid but 50 cents per day. Captain Maggiolo of the schooner Santa Cruz waited several days this week for the two factions to get things adjusted, and was able to get off this morning with a full cargo of men and supplies.”


June 6, 1901 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned to the island this morning with the mail to La Playa post office.”


June 12, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived last evening bringing over the ship wrecked crew of the Francine, left this afternoon for the island.”


June 16, 1901 [LAT/VC]: “The schooner Santa Cruz discharged Thursday a second cargo of wine at this port. The wine comes from the Santa Cruz Island.”


June 23, 1901 [SBMP]: “The Whitney party expects to leave for Santa Cruz Island on Saturday. They have at their disposal the fine gasoline launch belonging to the Caire estate, in which the party will sail. Mr. Whitney will go with the camp outfit in the Restless, Captain Burtis. The members of the party are: Mr. And Mrs. Frank M. Whitney, the Misses Whitney, McCall, Keating, Spaulding and Rosamund Pierce, Dr. Spaulding, and Messrs. Charles Fernald, Eugene Sheffield and Runston.”


June 25, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning with mail from La Playa post office.”


July 26, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island last night.”


July 27, 1901 [SBDI: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of wine and miscellaneous products.”


August 15, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived last evening from San Pedro, where she had taken a cargo of wine from the islands. Captain Maggiolo reports that he made the trip down in fine weather and time, but the return was arduous. Off Point Mugu he encountered heavy head seas, into which his little vessel backed until she ran out of gasoline. He then set sail and worked his way up the coast against the wind, reaching Ventura, where he laid in a new supply of gasoline. The Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island this morning with provisions for the ranch.”


August 23, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left this afternoon for the islands.”


September 5, 1901 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from the islands.”


September 27, 1901 [SBMP]: “Captain Maggiolo of the schooner Santa Cruz states that the grape picking season has commenced on Santa Cruz Island.”


October 9, 1901 [SBDN]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island. Among the passengers were two Italians who have labored in the vineyards continuously for five years. Each of them had accumulated enough money to return to Italy and land there with about $1000. The men on the island receive 75 cents a day and board, the fare consisting of mutton 365 days a year. As soon as the swarthy toilers and their fortunes reached port they took bee-line for a downtown restaurant and proceeded to eat everything in sight — except mutton.”


October 11, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came over yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island, bringing several Italian laborers.”


October 19, 1901 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz reached here yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 24, 1901 [SDN]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner made port yesterday after a smooth trip across the channel.”


October 31, 1901 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz and the launch Peerless arrived from the islands last evening.”


November 1, 1901 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday from the islands.”


November 1, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz also arrived from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 12, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from a trip to the Channel Islands.”


November 12, 1901 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, made port last evening from the islands. She had a rolling trip across, but the channel was fairly easy sailing. It was blowing outside when the schooner left the island.”


November 13, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, made port last evening from the islands.”


November 21, 1901 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island with provisions. She did not get afar, however. The vessel got stuck in the kelp and disabled her machinery and began to drift. Sail was set, but there was little wind and it took her till late afternoon last evening to get back to her berth off Stearn's Wharf.”


'November 21, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with six head of stock and other island products. The stock was landed through the surf.”


December 6, 1901 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner arrived yesterday morning from San Pedro where she had discharged a cargo of wine.”


December 19, 1901 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz left at 5 o'clock last evening with 4000 feet of lumber for the Western Coast Fishing Company who are erecting a cannery on the island.”


December 30, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left yesterday afternoon for Santa Cruz Island with the mail.”


January 26, 1902 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed last evening for Santa Cruz Island with 2000 feet of lumber for the fish cannery company stationed at the island.” [» Pelican Bay; West Coast Fishing Company]


May 15, 1902 [SBMP]: “All three of the island schooners were in port yesterday. The Santa Cruz brought a party of sheep shearers from Santa Cruz Island, the Mildred E. brought sheep from Santa Rosa Island, and the Restless also brought a cargo of sheep from San Miguel Island.”


July 3, 1902 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday.”


August 8, 1902 [LAT]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon with a quantity of wine for local and outside dealers.”


January 7, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


January 20, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for the islands this afternoon.”


February 7, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island, after a tedious lay-up on this side while waiting for a supply of gasoline.”


February 19, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in from the islands today, bringing forty barrels of wine for the local trade.”


February 21, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Santa Cruz Island this afternoon, having spent a couple of days in port to secure supplies.”


February 23, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz left for the islands, carrying the mails and a supply of provisions.”


February 25, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz did not succeed in getting away last evening according to expectations. She left this morning, however, with a cargo of supplies for the Santa Cruz Island Company and a few passengers.”


March 2, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island today, bringing a small cargo of wine and other island products. She is now unloading at Stearn’s Wharf and will sail as soon as a quantity of supplies can be put on board.”


March 18, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed this afternoon for Santa Cruz Island with a large quantity of supplies, after having been in this harbor for three days.”


June 2, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz will arrive today with the sheep shearers from the island...”


June 7, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island yesterday with a cargo of 215 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 7, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning carrying supplies for the colony on the island.”


July 10, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, belonging to the Santa Cruz Island Company, arrived in port yesterday morning with a cargo of sheep from the island.”


September 26, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline launch Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon, bringing over nothing but the mail.”


November 11, 1903 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from the island last night with a load of fine Bartlett pears and other fruit for the San Francisco market, and several barrels of wine for the local trade. The fruit was carefully wrapped in tissue paper and neatly packed. It presented an appearance calculated to surprise people who have the idea that nothing but grass and goats can be raised on Santa Cruz Island.”


November 26, 1903 [SBI]: “Yesterday Captain Jim Gardner took Allen G. Fraser, four carpenters and two laborers over to Santa Cruz Island on the power launch Frances. The men are to work on four new cottages, the materials for which were taken over yesterday by the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz.”


November 27, 1903 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz schooner took over a load of material Wednesday for the construction of cottages at the new resort on the island which Allan G. Fraser is promoting. Mr. Fraser and four carpenters went over in the Frances yesterday. The resort will be open for business as soon as the tourist season sets in, although it will not be complete.”


December 8, 1903 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor this morning with the mail and a stock of supplies for the people on Santa Cruz Island.”


December 12, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz returned from the islands last night.”


December 29, 1903 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came into port last evening for the purpose of having her machinery overhauled. As soon as this work is done she will return to the island and take aboard a cargo of wine for San Pedro.”


February 20, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived. Friday February 19. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, from Santa Cruz Island with cargo of wine. Sailed. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, for Santa Cruz Island.”


February 27, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. To leave—Saturday, February 27. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, for Santa Cruz Island.”


March 1, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived — Monday, February 29. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, from Santa Cruz Island. Sailed. Monday, February 29. Schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Maggiolo, for Santa Cruz Island.”


April 8, 1904 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning and will sail tonight on her return trip with thirty-five sheep shearers on board. The sheep-shearing season is about to commence on Santa Cruz and it is expected that it will continue for about forty-five days.”


April 12, 1904 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning with a score of sheep shearers to augment the force already at work on the annual clip at the island.”


April 15, 1904 [SBI]: “This morning the power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of fat sheep for the local butchers.”


May 5, 1904 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came into port yesterday morning with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand after a rough trip across the channel. She encountered a strong wind and heavy sea and when in the middle of the channel her machinery broke down.”


May 6, 1904 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port from Santa Cruz Island yesterday. The schooner encountered unusually rough weather in the channel, and had much difficulty in making the trip, her machinery having broken down in mid-channel.”


June 21, 1904 [LAH]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz has gone on the Iveson ways and is undergoing repairs. The engine will be overhauled, the rigging renewed and the vessel painted. The Santa Cruz is used in carrying wine from Santa Cruz Island to the mainland.”


August 23, 1904 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in yesterday with a load of wine, the product of the island. On its return trip it took over some passengers and supplies for the islands.”


October 29, 1904 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz is now at San Pedro being repaired in dry dock. It will be changed from a freight schooner to a passenger boat and will be employed after its return from San Pedro in carrying passengers to and from Pelican Bay Inn on Santa Cruz Island.”


January 13, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island auxiliary schooner left for the islands yesterday morning with a load of supplies and a number of workmen who are employed on the island.”


March 15, 1905 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz, in charge of Captain Prescott, came in yesterday afternoon from the islands, having ridden out the storm on this side of Santa Cruz. Captain Prescott states that Sunday's storm was the worst ever experienced at the islands...”


March 18, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island boat arrived in charge of Captain Prentiss from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon and discharged a cargo of wine.”


March 28, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in from the islands yesterday afternoon on one of her regular trips for mail and supplies and will return today.”


April 5, 1905 [SBMP]: “The island boat Santa Cruz left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday at noon, having on board a crew of sheep-shearers and supplies for the sheep-shearing camps reared on the island for the gathering of the season's crop of wool.”


April 5, 1905 [SBMP]: “The 1400 pound metal ballast of Fred Wales' sailboat Alleene has been found and will be attached to a cable by Mr. Emmons and a few large anchors will also be raised in the same manner, After the chains have been attached to the wrecks they will be raised by the steam schooner Santa Cruz.”


April 30, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep for local butchers.”


May 16, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday noon from the islands bringing in a cargo of merchandise, workmen and passengers.”


June 23, 1905 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Prescott, came into port yesterday from Santa Cruz Island in tow of a launch, having been picked up outside. The Santa Cruz dropped her propeller in the channel and is here for repairs.”


August 13, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from the islands late yesterday afternoon on one of her regular trips. She is in charge of Captain James Prescott.”


October 4, 1905 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port late Monday night from San Francisco where she has just received a thorough overhauling in the dry docks of that city during the last two months. She has received a new shaft and a propeller. The bottom has been strengthened and the rigging put in first class condition. The vessel made the trip from San Francisco in 40 hours, a very quick trip. She carried a cargo of pipe and other supplies for the Santa Cruz Island Company and sailed across the channel yesterday in charge of Captain James G. Prescott.”


October 26, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz in charge of Captain Prescott, sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor on that island yesterday morning with a cargo of supplies, mail and expresses for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


November 1, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came into port yesterday morning in charge of Captain James Prescott. She will soon return with supplies for the Island Company.”


November 14, 1905 [SBMP]: “Manager Arthur Caire of the Santa Cruz Island Company has returned from his island ranch with a party of friends, having been brought across the channel in the Santa Cruz Island steam schooner, which was in charge of Captain James Prescott. The schooner returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday.”


November 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning after unloading a string of cattle at this port for Sherman & Ealand. The cattle were thrown overboard and forced to swim ashore.”

December 3, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday morning with twelve head of cattle for Sherman & Ealand. The stock was unloaded east of Stearn’s Wharf, being thrown overboard and forced to swim ashore.”


December 7, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of supplies and horses for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


January 4, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with forty-two barrels of wine, amounting to 2310 gallons. Much wine is produced on the island. The average wine output of the island is about 150,000 gallons, but the last crop was injured by damp weather and the output will be much less.”


January 5, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner which has just discharged a cargo of native wine will sail for Ventura this morning to take a load of empty wine barrels to Santa Cruz Island.”


January 14, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday afternoon with some freight from the island. Before returning to Santa Cruz Island she will take on mail and supplies.”


January 25, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz is in port with another cargo of native wine which is grown and pressed on Santa Cruz Island. The schooner will soon return to Prisoners’ Harbor with supplies.”


February 13, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in port yesterday and after a short stay, during which mail and supplies were secured for the island ranch, she sailed back to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


February 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Prescott, sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


March 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came into port from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon in charge of Captain James Prescott. She is after mail and supplies for the island ranchers.”


April 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday after supplies for the men now employed on this island by the Caire Company. She will return today or Monday.”


April 20, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island last evening with a load of sheep for William Ealand, proprietor of the State Street market. She will take on a quantity of supplies for the island and will probably sail for her home harbor some time tomorrow.”


May 9, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from the island with a cargo of sheep for the State Street market...”


May 13, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz has sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor after being in this port for several days. She carried a large amount of supplies for the Santa Cruz Island ranch men.”


May 14, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island shortly before noon today for supplies, bringing a small quantity of wine and several head of sheep for local dealers. A few sheep shearers, who have been engaged at the island for several days past and whose services had come to an end, arrived on the schooner. It was stated by the captain of the boat that the work of shearing the sheep will have been completed and that fully 40,000 sheep will have been subjected to the clippers before the job had been finished.”


May 15, 1906 [SBI]:Santa Cruz still in port. The power yacht Santa Cruz Island [sic], which arrived from the island from which it received its name a couple of days ago, is still in the local harbor. She is taking on a quantity of supplies for the three ranches on the island, and will probably sail for the other side of the channel tomorrow.”


May 16, 1906 [SBI]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz, which has been in port from Santa Cruz Island for the past three days, securing supplies, sailed today for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


May 17, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which has been in port for the past few days, left this afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, with supplies. She will return on Saturday of this week with between 200 and 300 head of sheep for the State Street market. Charles Ealand left on the boat for the purpose of selecting the sheep.”

May 26, 1906 [SBI]: “The power launch Santa Cruz is expected to arrive from Santa Cruz Island tonight or tomorrow morning with a cargo of sheep. The Santa Cruz sailed for the island with a quantity of supplies, with Captain Prescott in charge, on Thursday last. It is expected that she will be able to discharge her cargo of livestock in time to leave for the island with more supplies on Monday afternoon.”


May 29, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain James Prescott, came in from Prisoners’ Harbor at 10 o’clock yesterday afternoon and discharged a crew of 20 sheep shearers who have been employed on the island for several weeks. The boat also brought over 120 sheep for Sherman’s meat markets, and unloaded several barrels of wine for the local trade.”


June 7, 1906 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners' Harbor yesterday with a gang of men for the island ranches. A number of the employees of the island company recently quit to go to San Francisco, attracted by stories of high wages.”


June 10, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in port yesterday from Prisoners' Harbor in charge of Captain James Prescott. She carried 140 sheep for William [? Charles] Sherman's market, and a cargo of wine for the local trade.”


June 24, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning with over 100 head of sheep. Large numbers of sheep have been brought from Santa Cruz Island this month for Sherman’s meat market. The pasturage on the island this year has been very good and the sheep are in fine condition.”


June 28, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday afternoon with 250 head of sheep for William Ealand of this city. Mr. Ealand has a contract with the island sheep men for 5000 head of sheep that are being delivered as fast as possible, the island schooner making frequent trips with several hundred head to the cargo.”


June 30, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island at 1 o’clock this afternoon with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand, proprietor of the State Street market. The sheep were being unloaded during the afternoon and the schooner will probably be able to leave for the island this evening or early tomorrow morning. Nearly all of the sheep brought to the mainland today will be shipped to Los Angeles to fill a part of a contract that Mr. Ealand recently entered into with the Cudahy Packing Company of that city.”


June 28, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, Captain Prescott in charge, with 250 head of sheep for William Ealand of this city, will sail for Prisoners’ Harbor tomorrow morning, and will take on another cargo of sheep for the local market and for shipment to Los Angeles. Captain Prescott stated today that it was expected that the schooner would be back to the mainland again early Friday morning. The boat will continue to make trips across the channel until all of the sheep that Mr. Ealand recently purchased from the island company shall have been delivered.”


July 1, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday with a cargo of sheep.”


July 4, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island this afternoon with another consignment of sheep and island produce. She will probably return tomorrow, after having taken on a quantity of supplies.”


July 5, 1906 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz came into port yesterday afternoon with four employees of the company. The Santa Cruz fired a salute for every state in the union, and one for the new state. The schooner had 200 head of cattle aboard for San Pedro, sailed for port later in the day.”


July 9, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island last Saturday afternoon with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand of this city, is still in the harbor. She will probably sail for Prisoners’ Harbor later this afternoon.”


July 11, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor a few days ago with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand of this city, will sail for the island late this afternoon, in charge of Captain Prescott, and will return with another load of sheep within a few days. Today the schooner was taking on a quantity of supplies for the various camps on the island.”


July 13, 1906 [SBI]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived in port several days ago with a cargo of sheep for shipment to Los Angeles, and which has been in port awaiting supplies, sailed yesterday afternoon for Santa Cruz Island and will return within a couple of days with another consignment.”


July 25, 1906 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz left last night for Santa Cruz Island after discharging her consignment of 80,000 gallons of liquor [wine] and taking on a cargo of supplies that were brought down from San Francisco by the Santa Rosa.”


August 25, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island today with a cargo of sheep for the Ealand Packing Company of this city. It is expected that she will return to Prisoners’ Harbor tomorrow, after taking on supplies for the island camps.”


August 29, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a cargo of sheep for the Ealand Packing Company, was preparing to return to Prisoners’ Harbor this afternoon. Today she took on fifty puncheons of 175 gallons capacity each, which had been returned from San Francisco, to which point they had been shipped filled with wine.”


September 4, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is expected to arrive from Santa Cruz Island late this afternoon or tomorrow morning with another cargo of sheep. She will also bring several puncheons of wine from the island warehouse. Supplies for the island camps will be taken to Prisoners’ Harbor on the return trip.”


September 5, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which was expected to have arrived at this port from Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, a couple of days ago with a cargo of sheep, has not yet put in an appearance. By those who are particularly interested in the arrival of the boat it is believed that the failure of the schooner to arrive here on stated time has been due to difficulties in loading the boat on the other side of the channel.”


September 13, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor several days ago, is still at anchor in the channel near the commercial wharf. It is expected that she will set sail for the island tomorrow, carrying supplies for the island tomorrow, carrying supplies for the island camps.”


September 27, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last evening from Santa Cruz Island, bringing a number of head of cattle from Prisoners’ Harbor. She will remain in port for a couple of days, taking on supplies for the island camps.”


September 28, 1906 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz, which arrived yesterday with cattle from Santa Cruz Island, is still in port. She is taking on supplies for the island camps and will probably be able to take her departure for Prisoners’ Harbor at some time tomorrow.”


November 10, 1906 [SBMP]: “The auxillary schooner Santa Cruz sailed for her home port across the channel yesterday in charge of Captain Prescott.”


December 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island at an early hour yesterday morning, bringing with her a quantity of wine. As soon as she can take on supplies, the schooner will return to Prisoners’ Harbor. It was the intention of Captain Prescott to return to the mainland early in the week, but the storm rendered it unsafe to attempt the trip across the channel.”


January 2, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which sailed for Santa Cruz Island a few days ago with a quantity of supplies, is still on the other side of the channel. It was expected that she would return yesterday with a number of puncheons of wine. She will probably reach the mainland today.”


January 4, 1907 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island at an early hour yesterday morning. She brought a quantity of wine for Santa Barbara dealers. She will probably remain here for a couple of days before taking supplies and returning to her home port at Prisoners’ Harbor.”


January 8, 1907 [SBMP]: “Shipping in danger. As the storm develops, there may be trouble in store for the light craft of the harbor. Late last evening the wind from the southeast was becoming very strong. The vessels in the harbor last night were the torpedo boat destroyer, Paul Jones, the Santa Cruz Island schooner, and ten launches.”


January 9, 1907 [SBMP]: “Wind demoralizes shipping, driving many craft to beach. Power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Prescott. In dangerous position. Still in harbor.”


January 10, 1907 [LAT/SB]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz, which weathered the storm during the night, broke her chains and was dashed against the commercial wharf at an early hour this morning. She ran up the flag of distress to the United States torpedo-boat-destroyer Paul Jones, which steamed to the relief of the disabled boat, and after maneuvering for half an hour, pulled her to anchorage. The Santa Cruz suffered considerable damage from her impact with the piles of the wharf, having her stern badly smashed and her engine put out of commission. So great was this impact with the wharf that hundreds of planks of that structure were torn from their positions.”


January 18, 1907 [SBMP]: “Lying at anchor yesterday were the Santa Cruz, the Vishnu, the Peerless, the Irene, the Victoria, and the launch formerly belonging to the fisherman Maglio.”


January 20, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which bumped wrong and thrust into the commercial wharf during the storm, after dragging her anchors and lost her symmetry and part of her stern, was scheduled to slip her mornings for a trip to the islands last night, after crawfish, following which she will at once proceed to San Pedro for repairs.”


April 12, 1907 [SBI]: “For the first time in several months the schooner Santa Cruz is in port, much improved in apprearance. It will be remembered that she was badly injured in the storm, which occurred here about three months ago, a considerable portion of her stern being torn away. Since that time she has been in San Pedro undergoing repairs, and is now in as good condition as ever. She came today from San Pedro by way of Prisoners’ Harbor.”


April 13, 1907 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz reached this port from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday, with Captain James B. Prescott aboard. This is the vessel's first visit since she was damaged in the southeast gale in January last. On that occasion it will be remembered she was towed to port by the torpedo destroyer, Paul Jones, and it was found she had sustained some $800 in damage. She went down to San Pedro to be repaired, and has now returned to resume regular trips to the island.”


April 16, 1907 [SBMP]: The launch Santa Cruz left yesterday afternoon with a company of workmen aboard for Scorpion Harbor at the east end of the island. They will be employed for the next week or two fixing the corrals and sheds and making ready generally for sheep shearing operations.”


April 20, 1907 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island last evening with 105 barrels of wine for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


April 26, 1907 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island last evening with 200 sheep for the Ealand meat market.”


May 11, 1907 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz launch left yesterday for the islands with a cargo of empty wine barrels. This boat recently brought over 105 barrels of wine consigned to Los Angeles.”


May 22, 1907 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which plies between this port and the island, came in this morning with a cargo of wine for San Francisco shipment. It also had aboard a small band of sheep for local butchers.”


May 24, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz was in from the island yesterday with a cargo of about twenty tons of wool, a small portion of the spring clip. The Santa Cruz will be engaged in the wool clip carrying trade for some time.”


May 30, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came in from the island Tuesday evening with a cargo of wool.”


June 8, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz reached port yesterday for supplies for the reaches across the channel.”


June 18, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Santa Cruz Island Sunday with mail for La Playa post office.”


June 26, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz reached port yesterday morning with Captain Prescott aboard, and a cargo of cattle from the islands for the local market.”


June 29, 1907 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning from the islands with 250 head of sheep for the State Street market.”


August 17, 1907 [SBMP]: “Captain J. G. Prescott, who ever since 1894 has been skipper and chief engineer of the steam schooner Santa Cruz, has severed his connection with the island company owing to the refusal of the Justinian Caire Company to recognize the increased cost of living and the advance in wages necessitated all along the line. According to those in a position to know, the skippers of small coasting steamers receive $85 per month, the first mate earning $75 and of course rations. The Caire Company has been paying their skippers $55 with a promise of an increase. This promise has never blossomed into fulfillment, and upon being reminded thereof the island company replied by accusing the captain of taking people across to the island without the company’s permission and to the annoyance of the superintendent, while the fact appears to have been that a local grocer paid a visit to the island at the special request and suggestion of the superintendent. The accusation in Captain Prescott’s case was the last straw, and he handed in his resignation forthwith. The Santa Cruz has been lying on this account at anchor with an idle crew ever since the middle of last month. There are hundreds of head of mutton undelivered, and thousands gallons of wine waiting to be transported to the mainland. The business of the island is at a standstill. Captain Prescott is a fully licensed mariner, and such men are not to be had unless paid the regulation scale. In the meantime, the captain will turn his attention from nautical affairs to agriculture, and farm his place on the mesa.”


August 28, 1907 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from the island in command of Captain T. H. Merry with 250 sheep for the local market.”


October 17, 1907 [SBWP]: “A captain has at last been secured for the schooner Santa Cruz. Captain George Nidever, the father of Captain Frank Nidever, took charge of the boat on Monday. He will take the schooner to the island and thence to San Pedro for repairs.”


October 26, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, after lying idle for over three months — ever since Captain Prescott handed in his resignation, sailed yesterday for the islands with Captain George E. Nidever at the helm. Captain George, it is presumed, got the raise Prescott wanted, as it is known he was approached more than once with an offer of position before he accepted it…”


October 29, 1907 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz arrived from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday at 3 P.M., having made her first trip with Captain Nidever in charge.”


November 1, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, with Captain George Nidever in command, started yesterday morning on her second trip of the season, to Prisoners' Harbor.”


November 22, 1907 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, under command of Captain Nidever, left this morning for Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, carrying mail and express.”


December 4, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz went to the island Monday night.”


1908: “..."The Captain of the schooner Santa Cruz, his brother, the crew, and the watchman from Prisoners' Harbor have come to serenade you, this being your first night on Santa Cruz Island." [at Willows]. The moon was shining very brightly and I could see four figures coming up the creek. As they rounded the big rock, they pulled out musical instruments and began to play La Paloma. The baby had awakened and began to cry, but then she listened to the music and quieted down... The Captain introduced his brother Jake [Nidever], the crewman Geronimo, and the watchman. They were dressed like the usual fishermen, in blue jeans, heavy shirts, caps and heavy boots, and each had a red bandana handkerchief. Sitting down on the apple boxes they played another tune. The baby was spellbound. When they finished the Captain asked how I had enjoyed the trip across the channel and how long I planned to stay. I told him about Ira's idea to take me to another harbor to camp for the winter, for Ira expected to fish there with a man named Frank Nidever. The Captain nodded and said, "Frank Nidever is my son, and Jake here is my brother." This was Captain Nidever, the son of George Nidever who was a famous sea otter hunter. Ira had spoken so much of him that I felt I knew him already...” [Eaton, Margaret Diary of a Sea Captain's Wife: Tales of Santa Cruz Island, (1980) p. 47]


January 1, 1908 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came to port last night from Santa Cruz Island for mail and supplies.”


May 29, 1908 [SBI]: “Owners of vineyards and wineries on Santa Cruz Island are in good spirits over what promises to be one of the largest grape crop for years, according to the crew of the large power schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from the island at 10 o’clock this morning. Captain Nidever of the Santa Cruz reports that the grape clusters are large and numerous on every vine, and that every indication points to a record yield. The Santa Cruz brought over several ranch hands and sheep shearers.”


June 30, 1908 [SBI]: “Captain Vasquez’ Gussie M, and the power schooner Santa Cruz, both arrived from the islands this morning. Captain W. G. Waters was left at his ranch at San Miguel Island, where he will remain for two months. The last consignment of seals were shipped east by Captain Vasquez today.”


August 28, 1908 [SBI]: “Fourteen priests of the Catholic church, attached to the diocese of Los Angeles, returned this morning from Santa Cruz Island in the power schooner belonging to the Santa Cruz Island Company. For one week the clergymen have been guests of the company at Prisoners’ Harbor, where they have camped out and roughed it.”


September 19, 1908 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived today with the second cargo to be brought from Santa Cruz Island within a week. On board were 100 bags of wool, with 300 pounds in each bag, and a quantity of wine.”


February 20, 1909 [SBI]: “Considerable mystery surrounds the finding of a large fresh water tank off Scorpion Harbor, near the east end of Santa Cruz Island, yesterday, by the schooner Santa Cruz, Captain George Nidever. The tank is a mammoth affair, and has a capacity of 1000 gallon of water. It is similar in make-up to the large fresh water tanks on ocean liners, and is valued at $750. The big tank is rusty in sections, and was covered with barnacles and marine growth when found floating near the island, where it constituted a menace to navigation. It is of heavy boiler iron, and was empty when found by Captain Nidever.”


March 11, 1909 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived today from the island with a cargo of wine. Conditions on the island are reported as most harmonious by the captain.”


March 18, 1909 [SBI]: “The gasoline steamer Santa Cruz from the island bearing that name, arrived in Santa Barbara this morning.”


April 7, 1909 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz schooner came in yesterday and unloaded 210 head of sheep, which were sold to Santa Barbara parties.”


April 17, 1909 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island power schooner discharged 33 barrels of wine yesterday. The schooner will go back to the island today, taking ten extra men to work in the vineyards.”


October 23, 1909 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner discharged a cargo of 220 head of sheep yesterday at Stearn’s Wharf. The sheep have been purchased by Ealand Packing Company. The sheep from Santa Cruz Island are considered desirable stock on account of being free from all disease.”


November 9, 1909 [SBMP]: “All the working men, the sheep shearers and the vaqueros on Santa Cruz Island went on a strike Sunday and came to this city in a body, yesterday on the launch Santa Cruz with Captain George Nidever...”


December 16, 1909 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz Island boat returned to Santa Barbara yesterday evening for supplies.”


January 13, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner, s, came in from the island yesterday with a cargo of 13,000 pounds of the fall wool clip. A cargo brought in Tuesday amounted to 25,000 pounds. Captain Nidever stated that there were several cargoes yet to be brought over. The fall clip is the smaller one of the year and the spring shearing is expected to double the present output. Owing to the heavy early rains the spring clip will be in a much cleaner condition.”


January 22, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner was in yesterday with 15 bags of wool, the last of the fall clip. This makes a total of about one third of the amount that was brought over the last year, due to the fact that a strike of sheep shearers last autumn necessarily caused the sheep owners to allow the herds to go with the spring shearing with a full coat.”


February 5, 1910 [SBI]: “Six fancy-bred bulls for improving the stock on Santa Cruz Island were taken on board by the power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain George Nidever, this morning for shipment to the island. They were bought by the Caire family of San Francisco, owners of the island.”


March 24, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner, Captain George Nidever, came into port yesterday afternoon from Prisoners' Harbor. Her engines were out of order and she came here for repairs.”


April 2, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner, Captain Nidever, came in yesterday from the island with a cargo of sheep for the Ealand Packing Company.”


April 22, 1910 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz has sailed for the island with a cargo of lumber to be used in the construction of the new home for the Caire family.”


April 26, 1910 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz Island boat is being packed with lumber which will be taken to the island either this evening or tomorrow morning to be used in the construction of the new Caire residence at the inner ranch. There is a large quantity of stone and other material at the house site already, and the work will be pushed as rapidly as possible.”


July 22, 1910 [SBI]: “The launch Santa Cruz has returned from the islands where she left Frank [Fred] Caire, part owner of the island, who is overseeing the building of the ranch house.”


August 14, 1910 [SBMP]: “A party including Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ruiz and their daughter, Mrs. B. P. Ruiz, and children, Arthur Greenwell and son and others have established a camp near Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, and will remain for a month, relatives and friends joining them at different times. The trip across was made in the island company’s schooner.”


October 29, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner is transporting this year’s clip of wool from Prisoners’ Harbor to Santa Barbara. The shipments now will aggregate over 500 bags more than 100 tons. The schooner brings about 25 tons each trip.”


November 7, 1910 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz brought 77 sacks of wool from Santa Cruz Island Sunday morning and will make another trip Tuesday.”


November 23, 1910 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is at San Pedro for the purpose of having her hull sheathed with copper. This is protection very few of the vessels in south coast waters have.”


December 27, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island Company’s powerboat is expected back shortly, in command of Captain George Nidever. The island mail and express service is being handled by Captain Frank Nidever and his sloop.”


December 27, 1910 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz Island [sic] is expected here soon to carry mail and provisions to the island.”


December 28, 1910 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain George Nidever, arrived yesterday from San Pedro, where she has been for some weeks undergoing repairs.”


April 23, 1911 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left yesterday for the island of that name. On her was A. J. Caire, one of the owners of the island. He was accompanied by an employee of the Ealand Packing Company, and on the return, a cargo of about 200 sheep, which will be selected by Mr. Caire, will be brought over.”


October 8, 1911 [SBMP]: “The Saturday afternoon crowd at the beach was treated to a new excitement. A Santa Cruz Island steer brought to port yesterday on the Santa Cruz Company’s schooner, jumped overboard as the sailors were attempting to drive him up the gangway from the boat’s deck to the wharf. The animal plunged headlong into the sea, swam under the wharf, and struck out for the beach in front of the Potter …”


October 11, 1911 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz came over yesterday with the Caire family and relatives, who immediately left by train for San Francisco. The Santa Cruz also had aboard 100 sheep for Santa Barbara. She sailed again this morning with a crew of twenty men to handle the grape crop on the island and work in the winery.”


October 13, 1911 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner yesterday landed another cargo of beef cattle for the Gehl Packing company.”


November 1, 1911 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner arrived here yesterday afternoon with produce from the island.”


November 3, 1911 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz arrived here last night with 212 sheep for Santa Barbara. She will lay over a day or two before she returns to the island.”


November 14, 1911 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 227 head of sheep for the Gehl Packing Company. On its next trip it is expected that the 'Santa Cruz will bring twelve barrels of wine. The present capacity of the winery on the island is being taxed. There have so far been only small shipments of wine, so the coming one will be the most important this season. It is said that the crop of the vineyards on the island this year will yield about 120,000 gallons of wine, the greatest in the history of the industry.”


January 3, 1912 [SBI]: “New copper is being put on the bottom of the island schooner Santa Cruz, now in San Pedro, where she is receiving other repairs and having her engine put in shape. The Santa Cruz is expected back here in a day or two.”


July 27, 1912 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came across the channel yesterday.”


February 12, 1912 [LAT]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz left this afternoon for that island with a cargo of provisions. The Santa Cruz has been in port since Friday.”


February 14, 1913 [SBMP]: “Feed never so good on islands as now. Captain George E. Nidever says Santa Cruz Island sheep are already in clover. Captain George E. Nidever, master of the power schooner Santa Cruz, arriving yesterday from the south side of the channel, reports that in his life-long experience he has never seen feed in such good condition and the season so generally promising as it is this time...”


March 2, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz sailed yesterday afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island.”


March 20, 1913 [SBDN]: “The island schooner from Santa Cruz Island is expected here this evening or Friday morning.”


April 6, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, yesterday with a quantity of empty puncheons for island wine.”


April 25, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, Captain Nidever, arrived yesterday noon from Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. Captain Nidever brought reports that Sunday’s rain yielded an inch of rain, which brings the total for the season on the island to more than 15 inches.”


August 3, 1913 [SBMP]: “Harry Wood, Jr. left yesterday on the power schooner Santa Cruz for Santa Cruz Island, where he will spend several days hunting and fishing.”


September 20, 1913 [SBDN]: “Schooner Santa Cruz on rocks near Rincon; Captain and crew safe. The schooner Santa Cruz, 100-foot beam, owned by the Santa Cruz Island Company of San Francisco, went on the rocks off the mouth of Rincon Creek at 10 o’clock last night, and it is believed she will be a total loss. Captain George Nidever, Engineer Angelo and Joe Bermudez were bringing the schooner from the dry dock at San Pedro, where the owners had just expended over $1000 in repairs, which included recoppering the keel, repainting and general overhauling. Forced to abandon the schooner, Captain Nidever and his two companions rowed all night, unable to get their bearings until daylight, when they pulled for this port, reaching here at 5 o’clock this morning, exhausted from their night’s experience. The night was one of dense blackness and a mushy fog cloaked the ocean. The dampness seriously affected the compass. All went well until the crash came. Captain Nidever had chosen his course for the last lap of the run by the Hueneme lighthouse. He had figured in a point and a half variation of the compass, and under ordinary circumstances this would have been sufficient, but later developments showed that the variation must have been two points and a half. While steaming along, the vessel suddenly struck. The impact was followed by rumbling, creaking, crashing sounds, as the schooner ploughed forward onto the rocks. Instantly the engines were stopped, and all hands rushed to the deck. The vessel was listing heavily, every wave breaking completely over her. A high sea was running. Captain Nidever realized that it would be suicide to stay with the wrecked vessel, which appeared to be pounding to pieces rapidly. With much difficulty, a boat was launched and the three men put off. They could now hear the heavy surf breaking on the rocks, and were afraid to risk landing in the dark on an unknown point of the coast. Later they ascertained that they had fouled on the rocks near the mouth of Rincon Creek. This is one of the most dangerous points on the coast. The Captain, after reporting here, started back shortly after 9 o’clock this morning on the Gussie M to investigate the wreck. The vessel was built in San Francisco for the Caires, owners of Santa Cruz Island, and has been used for years as a freight and passenger vessel, though carrying of freight between this city and the island was its principal business. It is valued at between $12,000 and $15,000 and was uninsured. Captain Nidever is one of the veteran mariners on this coast, having been on the sea for over 40 years, and in all that time this is said to be his first mishap. Other captains in port today declare that with such a night as last night it was no wonder that the vessel grounded, as a compass is practically useless when there is such a fog. Mr. and Mrs. A. Raines of Los Angeles, motoring to this city, this morning came upon the wrecked schooner Santa Cruz. They boarded her and found only a cat, the entry in the log reading: ‘Left San Pedro 10 o’clock, Friday, September 18.’ When they reached the Potter Hotel they were enlightened. They had imagined the lone vessel to be a mute evidence of a tragedy on the high seas. Word received from the Santa Cruz late this afternoon was that the Gussie M had a line to the stranded schooner, and the rescuers are now waiting until high tide to make an effort to pull the vessel off. An investigation revealed no hole in the hull, and there is a possibility that the schooner may be saved. She has a small cargo, which is being taken off. At low tide it was possible to wade out to the stranded vessel.”


September 21, 1913 [SBMP]: “Channel boat ashore at Rincon. Santa Cruz Island power schooner strikes rocks in fog. Returning from San Pedro where she has been in drydock, the island schooner Santa Cruz ran on the rocks at the Rincon during the fog of Friday night. Captain George Nidever and the crew escaped in an open boat, although in the fog they rowed all the way to Santa Barbara, when the shore was but a few yards away. The vessel lay yesterday about twenty feet from the point and appeared to be secured on the rocks. Efforts to save her will be made, although the tides are not very high at present. With a system of pontoons it was hoped to lift the Santa Cruz from her precarious position. It is believed a couple of holes were stove in the bottom of the ship. The owners of the Santa Cruz had just expended $1000 on the vessel. The ship was guided north Friday, passing Hueneme light in safety. This was used as a guide beyond, but the heavy fog came on, and with such an irregular coast as this, it was impossible to exactly fix bearings. When it was thought the ship was well out in the channel, she was actually nearing land. Beside Captain Nidever, Engineer Arnelo and Joe Bermudez were the acting crew. The three embarked in a small boat as soon as it was realized the vessel was fast. Still without their bearings in a fog that sight could penetrate only a few feet, the men kept rowing until after daylight and their efforts of the night brought them to Santa Barbara. They then had no exact idea of where they had abandoned the Santa Cruz, and it was reports from the south later that told of the wreck. Mr. and Mrs. Raines, of Los Angeles, motoring north, noticed the abandoned vessel, boarded her, found the ship’s cat and the entry of leaving San Pedro. The Santa Cruz was built by the Caire estate in 1893 at Benicia, her home port being San Francisco. She is 64 feet long, with a beam of 18.6 feet. She is valued at about $15,000. The Santa Cruz is equipped with gasoline power.”


September 21, 1913 [LAT]: “Santa Barbara. Schooner Santa Cruz is wrecked on rocks. Lost in the fog, the schooner Santa Cruz, owned by the Caire estate of San Francisco, last night ran onto the rocks off the Rincon Mountain, fifteen miles south of here. It was announced today that the boat is a total loss. Captain George Nidever, Engineer Angelo and Joe Bermudez, were bringing the schooner from the drydock at San Pedro, where the owners had just expended over $1000 in repairs, which included recoppering the keel, repainting and general overhaul…”


September 23, 1913 [SBDN]: “Word received on the wharf this morning from the stranded schooner Santa Cruz, which is on the rocks off the Rincon, is that she is doomed. It is stated that a portion of her keel floated ashore during the high tide, and that one of her masts is toppling. Both the Gussie M and the Otter are still standing by, having lines fast to the wreck, but though they claim to have pulled her 10 feet off the beach yesterday, her position this morning is declared to be perilous. The chief obstacle in the way of floating her is the heavy ballast of pig iron which she carries. There appeared no way to lighten her of this, though a small cargo she was bringing to this port from San Pedro was removed. High seas were running this morning, and with the schooner showing signs of breaking up, wharf people declare her fate is practically sealed.”


September 23, 1913 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton of the Gussie M, arriving lst evening from the stranded schooner Santa Cruz, reports the vessel still fast on the rocks off Rincon. The tides are too low to hope for floating the Santa Cruz. She is taking no particular harm, and unless the surf is heavier than it is at present, she may lie where she is for another week and still be in condition to save.”


September 24, 1913 [SBDN]: “… Mr. Caire arrived here last night and registered at the Raffour House. He came south to take charge of the floating of the schooner Santa Cruz, which is aground off the Rincon. He left this morning with Captain Vasquez aboard the Otter for the stranded vessel. A thorough investigation will be made, with a view of deciding what steps to take to float the schooner. A tug has been chartered at San Pedro for the work. Captain Vasquez reported to Mr. Caire that while the keel of the Santa Cruz is going, that the vessel is not breaking to pieces, and could be saved. He stated that the beach is sandy where the Santa Cruz rests, though there may be rocks beneath her hull. Captain Vasquez does not regard her condition as precarious.”


September 24, 1913 [SBMP]: “Members of the Caire company arrived here yesterday to investigate the stranding of the power schooner Santa Cruz at Rincon. It was determined to secure the services of a tug, and telegraphic orders were sent to San Pedro for a vessel of sufficient power to pull the schooner from its position on the beach. The tug is expected to arrive this morning, and the effort will be made to float the schooner with the high tide at 5:15 this afternoon, if conditions are not favorable before that time. Reports that the Santa Cruz has gone to pieces and cannot be saved were declared by the owners to be untrue. The boat has taken very little harm since it went ashore.”


September 25, 1913 [SBDN]: “That the schooner Santa Cruz will be pulled from the rocks at Rincon today is the belief of A. J. Caire, of the Santa Cruz Island Company, owner of the schooner. A tug from San Pedro arrived this morning. The stranded vessel has been loaded with casks and barrels, which will float her, and keep her from sinking while the tug tows her back to the dry dock at San Pedro. This morning the Gussie M, having aboard a supply of barrels, lumber and tackle, and carrying Captain George Nidever of the Santa Cruz, left here for the wreck. Nidever will take charge of the stranded schooner again.”


September 26, 1913 [SBMP]: “The gasoline power schooner Santa Cruz may be moved from the beach at Rincon today, although efforts yesterday failed. The tug arriving from San Pedro was not of sufficient power. Another tug is expected today.”


September 26, 1913 [SBDN]: “A big tug from San Pedro tried all day yesterday to pull the Santa Cruz from the rocks off the Rincon, but failed. Another attempt will be made this afternoon at high tide. This morning workmen have been at work raising the stranded schooner from the cushion of sand into which it has been gradually sinking since it went ashore last week. Captain George Nidever returned from the wreck this morning, and expressed the belief that the tug, aided by the Gussie M, would be able to float the schooner before night. If not, it is probable another tug will be brought into play.”


September 29, 1913 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is still fast on the Rincon reef, where it went aground over a week ago. Tugs from San Pedro have tried in vain, with each rising tide, to float the ill-fated vessel. Ship carpenters are now at work on her, and those who are trying hard to coax the schooner back into deep water are still hoping that they will ultimately succeed.”


September 30, 1913 [SBMP]: “After having made several futile attempts to dislodge the schooner Santa Cruz, tugs yesterday left the vessel and she has virtually been abandoned. The ship appears fast on the rocks at the Rincon and now is showing some signs of breaking up. During the last few days the Santa Cruz has been dismantled and everything of value taken off her. The Santa Cruz went on the beach a week ago and every effort has been made to get her into deeper water, but these efforts have had no success. The beating sea has torn some parts from her, and as it is known she is badly stove in, the prospects are total destruction.”


October 5, 1913 [LAT]: “To the click of the motion-pictures camera, the International Marine Salvage Company of this city started the work yesterday of removing the schooner Santa Cruz from the rocks on the line of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, where she went ashore ten days ago. As soon as the little boat—she is forty-five tons net—is removed from the rocks, it will be towed to the Craig yard at Long Beach for repairs. The Grant flexible pontoons are being used to lift the vessel and will be used to tow her in here. The pictures of the raisin of the ship from the nest of rocks where she went aground are to be used in connection with an advertising campaign that the salvage company expects to launch.”


October 29, 1913 [SBDN]: “Today the freighter Santa Cruz, which went on the reef near Rincon during a heavy fog several weeks ago, is to start for San Pedro, aided by a balloon. The steamer was moved 1400 feet south of where she went aground, and a crew of ship’s carpenters has been working on her hull, caulking the seams, repairing the gashes made by the rocks, and in other ways making her seaworthy. The canvas air bag, or balloon, was inserted in the ship’s hold Monday, and this morning was pumped with air until it made the boat buoyant. It was expected to get her off shore shortly after the noon hour today, and leave at once for San Pedro, where she will go on the drydock for an extensive overhauling. The saving of the schooner has been a most remarkable feat, for where she grounded, the rocks were sharp and ragged, and she was so long pounding on the rocks that it required considerable skill to get her off in anything like fair shape. This is the first instance in which a balloon has been employed in getting a grounded vessel off the shore in this section.”


December 5, 1913 [SBMP]: “The launch Charm, Captain H. S. Short, arrived yesterday from the islands, having been delayed a day or two by rough weather. With the Santa Cruz Island Company’s schooner still stranded at Rincon, the Charm is serving as a carrier for business to the islands and the mainland. Yesterday the launch brought a small cargo of livestock and wine.”


December 17, 1913 [SBMP]: “A final effort will be made by the Los Angeles Wrecking Company to pull the schooner Santa Cruz from the beach near Rincon. The hull has been patched and the boat placed in position to take advantage of the first high tide. Yesterday it was believed that the vessel might be floated within 24 hours. It will then be towed to San Pedro and placed in dry dock for reconstruction.”


December 19, 1913 [SBMP]: “Schooner, stranded several months ago successfully floated yesterday. After being stranded upon the beach near Rincon for several months, the schooner Santa Cruz was successfully floated yesterday by Ira T. Fleming of the San Pedro Salvage Company. A capstan was used in pulling the vessel into deep water, the men taking advantage of the high tide. The Santa Cruz was wrecked on the beach near the mouth of Carpinteria Creek several months ago, and was later pulled on shore where repairs were made, making it perfectly seaworthy. The boat will be towed to San Pedro, where its engines, temporarily removed, will be replaced and the vessel put in working order.”


December 19, 1913 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which went on the Rincon reef during a heavy fog two months ago, was successfully launched yesterday afternoon at high tide by a San Pedro and San Francisco wrecking crew, which has been working for over a month in preparing for this event, after one unsuccessful effort to get her into deep water. The schooner was temporarily repaired, her engines removed, and the hull filled with an air-tight canvas bag, which was filled with air. She is being towed to San Pedro to the drydock.”


January 10, 1914 [SBMP]: “Reports brought from San Pedro state that the plan to rebuild the power schooner Santa Cruz, property of the Caire estate, owners of Santa Cruz Island, has been abandoned. The owners spent $2000 to get the stranded vessel from the beach near Rincon, and she was then towed to San Pedro and put in dry dock for reconstruction. The hull was found to be in such bad shape that the island trade will be constructed [?]. The engine has already been consigned to the scrapheap, sand having ruined the bearings.”


January 13, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which was reported so badly damaged that repairs were thought useless, proves to be in splendid condition, and will return to Santa Barbara in April, and re-enter the island trade for the summer. Captain Vasquez this morning returned from San Pedro in the Otter bringing this news of the Santa Cruz. The repairs have been very extensive, much of the old planking having been replaced with new timbering, and the work of overhauling the vessel will probably not be completed for a month or two, but when she returns to the water she will be one of the swiftest boats afloat. The owners are now thinking of installing a 40-horse Imperial engine, and in many other ways improving her.”


February 6, 1914 [LAT]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is being rebottomed and retimbered at much expense, her long sojourn on the rocks off Hueneme making her salvage an almost hopeless task.”


April 4, 1914 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which ran into the rocks at Rincon Point several months ago and suffered heavy damage in consequence, is now ready to leave the dry dock at San Pedro and is expected to arrive here today or tomorrow. Very thorough has been the repairs on the vessel and now she is in better shape than ever before in at least one important respect. She has been given a fine new Corliss engine of 75-horsepower, capable of giving the craft a speed of ten knots an hour loaded to her full capacity of forty-five tons, the engine formerly in use being able to make only eight knots or less. The Santa Cruz belongs to the Caire estate, and for years past she has a busy life in transporting passengers and cargo between the island and the mainland. She is a staunch vessel, and with her recent reconstruction it is thought that she will yet be good service for an indefinite period.”


April 20, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Captain George Nidever, former commander of the power schooner Santa Cruz, will be in charge of the resort at Fry’s Harbor on Santa Cruz Island this summer...” [Nidever was fired by the Santa Cruz Island Company after he ran the schooner aground.]


April 30, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, after being long expected from San Pedro, arrived on her maiden trip since her disaster on the Rincon reef, this morning. She has all her old familiar lines, no outward change being noticeable. The biggest alteration is the installation of a new and powerful engine. She will resume her freight carrying to Santa Cruz Island. This relieves Captain Vasquez of the Otter, from the freighting business, and henceforth the Otter will devote its time to the passenger traffic.”


May 6, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz still rocks at anchor in the bay, while a member of the United States marshal’s office treads her deck. Her trouble arose over a collision while coming out of San Pedro last week. A high wind was blowing and the captain had ordered the engines stopped. A stiff wind slapped her, and she was thrown to one side, and raked a steam launch. The owner of the launch at once demanded damage in the sum of $1000 and liabled her with a suit in the federal court at Los Angeles. The captain of the Santa Cruz took a ship builder aboard the launch and the latter’s estimate was that the damage could be repaired for $50. The captain ordered the work done at his expense. But the launch owner was after bigger damages, and placed the case in the federal courts. The owners of the Santa Cruz refused to be held up, and proposed to fight the case.”


May 6, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz was released by the federal authorities yesterday on telegraphic orders from Los Angeles, the damage suit instituted against the owners of the steamer having been settled.”


May 6, 1914 [SBNP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz is still lying at her mooring in the bay in custody of a U.S. deputy marshal. This is the result of an edict of the federal court in Los Angeles, in which the boat was liabled for damages said to have been done to the steam-yacht Lucero as the Santa Cruz was leaving San Pedro after overhauling. The local boat ran into the yacht and demolished one of her masts and did little other damage of trivial nature. Captain Olivari, of the schooner Santa Cruz, brought her back, went ashore and bringing to the dock the boat builder who had recently reconstructed his craft, took the latter aboard the damaged yacht to see what mischief had been done, and instructed him to repair the damage and charge it to the owner of the Santa Cruz. This damage, the builder said, would cost about $40, so it is reported to the Morning Press. Captain Olivari sailed away thinking the matter amicably adjusted, and returned to Santa Barbara and, later, to Prisoners’ Harbor. Later, the owners of the Lucero libled the Santa Cruz, on the strength of the incident related, claiming damage of $1000, and the boat was seized at Prisoners’ Harbor, brought over to the mainland and left in charge of the officer as stated. Just how long it will take to get the vessel out of the hands of the law is all a matter of speculation, as the red tape of the admiralty is both intricate and inexplicable. It seems to many people in this city deplorable, however, that the schooner should have to be kept out of commission over a squabble about a split mast and a few scratches and bruises on a small pleasure craft.”


May 27, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island with 205 sheep for the Gehl Packing Company. The sheep are in fine condition, indicating an abundance of feed on the island.”


June 24, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left this morning for Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of supplies for the Caire family, who were passengers on the schooner for their summer home on the island.”


June 30, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Fifty rams from the northern part of the state were taken to Santa Cruz Island today for the Caire estate. They made the trip aboard the schooner Santa Cruz. They were to be turned loose on the island to bring up the standard of the sheep being raised there.”


August 7, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The island boat Santa Cruz arrived here this morning from the islands to take on supplies for the company.”


August 22, 1914 [SBDNI]: “The steamer Santa Cruz returned to Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon with supplies and additional workmen for the increased work on the ranch.”


December 10, 1914 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday for mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 14, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a party of laborers for the Caire ranch.”


January 15, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday for mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Santa Cruz left for Prisoners Harbor yesterday morning with supplies and empty wine casks for the Caire ranch.”


January 23, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 23, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Coming in to get supplies for the Caire ranch, the powerboat Santa Cruz was here yesterday.”


February 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners' Harbor with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


February 19, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of wine. She will probably return to the islands today.”


March 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


March 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday, arriving about noon after supplies for the Caire ranch.”


March 14, 1915 [SBMP]: “The powerboat schooner Santa Cruz started off for Prisoners' Harbor at an early hour yesterday morning, but when she got about three miles off shore her engine broke down, and after a wait of several hours, she proceeded on her voyage under sail.”


March 27, 1915 [SBMP]: “Shearers to island. Unless deterred by unfavorable weather, the power schooner Santa Cruz will take a force over to Prisoners' Harbor today or tomorrow to get things ready for sheep shearing on the Caire ranch, this work to begin within a week or ten days.”


March 27, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Annual sheep shearing on the Caire ranch will begin within a week or 10 days. The Santa Cruz Island schooner is taking over supplies and employees to the island to prepare for the shearing.”


March 30, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


April 2, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning to get a load of freight brought from San Francisco by steamer for the Caire ranch.”


April 10, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz went to Prisoners' Harbor yesterday afternoon with a load of supplies for the Caire Ranch.”


April 20, 1915 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with Superintendent Revello and twenty-five sheep shearers that he had collected for the annual sheep shearing on the Caire ranch. There are between 30,000 and 40,000 sheep to handle, and the job is expected to take about 60 days.”


May 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


May 6, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a load of fat sheep for the Gehl Packing Company. Several attempts to land were made, but the water was too rough, and Captain Olivari concluded to wait for smoother water to discharge his cargo.”


May 6, 1915 [SBDN]: “Scrambling along, climbing over every ditch and sand pile along the road, instead of following the center of the street, nearly 100 sheep from Santa Cruz were unloaded from the Caire Ranch Company’s boat, Santa Cruz, this morning and driven to Gehl Packing Company’s stockyards on the west side. The sheep, gray from the dust and range of the island, were brought over yesterday, but could not be unloaded at Stearn’s Wharf because of the high tide and heavy swell at that time. Five cowboys were required to drive the sheep. Two went in front, and the prospective mutton padded along behind, making a skidding noise like big non-skid auto tires as their small hoofs skipped along the street.”


May 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Island boat leaves. The power schooner Santa Cruz, which brought a load of sheep over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Wednesday, and was unable to land on account of rough water, discharged her cargo yesterday and returned to the island with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


May 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “Arthur Caire went to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon on the Caire power schooner Santa Cruz.”


May 25, 1915 [SBMP]: “Fat sheep received. The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday, after delivering 122 head of fat sheep to the F. N. Gehl Packing Company.”


May 28, 1915 [SBMP]: “A. J. Avery, the contractor, came over from Prisoners’ Harbor on the power schooner Santa Cruz yesterday morning for more materials and more men to use in his improvement work on the island. He was accompanied by a number of men who took advantage of the opportunity to pay a short visit to their families on the mainland. Mr. Avery has had fifteen men at work across the channel during the past two weeks. They have built three large barns and two cottages, and have a lot of work to do yet in construction, remodeling and repairing buildings in different parts of the island.”


June 2, 1915 [SBMP]: The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a load of lumber for the building operations now underway on the island and supplies for various camps there.”


June 7, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Grape vines on the Caire ranch at Santa Cruz Island are to be treated with an application of dry sulphur to kill insect pests. This morning the Santa Cruz, the company’s power schooner, took on board a cargo of supplies, including 15 sacks of sulphur, to be used in killing insect pests on the ranch vineyards.”


June 8, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz came over for lumber and supplies for the various Caire camps on the island.”


June 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “Sheep from the island. The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon with a load of fat sheep for the California Market.”


June 22, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz Island [sic], after a stay of several days at anchor in this harbor, returned to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


June 29, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which came over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Sunday, sailed for the same port yesterday afternoon with supplies for the Caire ranches.”


July 4, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz Island [sic], the Otter and the Sea Wolf will all be in the water pageant as big as life tomorrow night. The smaller craft named both have parties for the islands on that day, but they will hustle the excursionists home in time for the big water event that is expected to be so fine a feature of the 4th of July celebration.”


July 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning, after having taken a very creditable part in the beautiful marine pageant that was so fine a feature of the Fourth of July celebration in Santa Barbara the preceding evening.”


August 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor about 1 o’clock with twenty-five fat cattle for local butchers, and four of the steers jumped overboard from the boat as it lay at the dock, and started in a bee-line to swim back to the island. A big rescue party was hastily organized, and ten of Captain Gourley’s Whitehall boats were impressed into service for the chase by vaqueros and others. The escaping bovines were overtaken at the kelp beds and roped and towed ashore. One of the wildest of the steers made a great fight and came near climbing into the boat that was chasing him. He changed his course and swam in nearly to the pleasure pier, frightening a number of people watching on the beach.”


September 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz went to Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


November 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned yesterday morning from San Pedro, where she had been given her annual overhauling and repainting. She ‘looked like new,’ and made a very neat appearance as she sailed out in the afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor with a load of supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 1, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning. The captain and crew will spend New Year's day here and return to the island tomorrow with a load of supplies.”


January 7, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday for a load of supplies for the Caire ranch. The vessel will return to her home port today.”


February 11, 1916 [SBDN]: “The Santa Cruz Island Company’s schooner Santa Cruz is off Stearn’s Wharf, having arrived here last night. Captain Olivari will take her back to the island tomorrow with a load of supplies.”


March 3, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which came from Prisoners' Harbor last Tuesday to bring A. J. Caire to the mainland, returned to her home port yesterday, laden with freight recently brought by steamer from San Francisco for the Caire ranch and a large quantity of supplies.”


March 17, 1916 [SBMP]: “Oologists go on expedition. Slipping away noiselessly into the fog yesterday morning, the steam schooner Santa Cruz carried two veteran oologists, who constitute the first expedition sent out by the new Museum of Comparative Oology... ”


April 1, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz is on this side of the channel, and today she will sail for Prisoners' Harbor with a force of men to get ready for the shearing on the Caire ranch...”


May 14, 1916 [SBMP]: “Good island mutton. Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor with 200 fat sheep for local butchers.”


May 10, 1916 [SBDNI]: “The Santa Cruz Island Company’s launch today brought over a cargo of sheep and cattle for local markets.”


July 29, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Olivari of the power schooner Santa Cruz, who came over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Thursday with 40 tons of wool from the Caire ranges, will return this morning with a load of supplies for the various departments of the great island ranch...”


September 27, 1916 [SBDN]: “The pleasure yacht Santa Cruz from Santa Cruz Island arrived this morning from San Pedro where she has been in dry dock.”


October 21, 1916 [SCICo]: “We believe it advisable to have some emergency provisions on the schooner so in case they have to run for shelter on short notice, they won't go hungry. The basis of the trouble on the schooner between the Captain [Olivari] and the men is largely due to his lack of eyesight. He is more or less distant from his crew for that reason and they undoubtedly take advantage of it.”


January 25, 1917 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Santa Cruz came over from the islands yesterday noon with ninety head of fat sheep for the F. N. Gehl Packing Company.”


March 9, 1917 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz brought 250 lambs from Santa Cruz Island for the local market yesterday.”


March 21, 1917 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor with a cargo of wine. She will take back mail and supplies for the island ranches.”


June 30, 1917 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners Harbor yesterday morning with a load of fat steers for the F. N. Gehl Packing Company.”


July 24, 1917 [SBMP]: “Wine from island—Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners Harbor with a cargo of wine for the local market.”


August 11, 1917 [SBDN]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island today with a load of cattle. She returned this afternoon with a cargo of supplies for the island residents.”


August 15, 1917 [SBDN]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came in this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a miscellaneous cargo. She returned to her home port this afternoon.”


November 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came over from Prisoners’ Harbor in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning and returned to the same island port in the afternoon with mail and supplies for the Caire ranch. The Sea Wolf is handling the transportation matters from the ranch named during the absence of Caire’s power schooner, Santa Cruz, while the latter craft is undergoing an overhauling at San Pedro...”


December 7, 1917 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, engaged in the traffic of the Caire ranch on Santa Cruz Island, with her home port at Prisoners’ Harbor, is again in commission after a complete overhauling at San Pedro, a process that requires 43 days. Captain Olivari, her skipper, states that the boat is now in better shape than ever before. She brought to the mainland last Wednesday a load of fat sheep for a local butcher, and will return to the island today with a load of supplies for various stations on the ranch.”


December 20, 1917 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Cruz has just brought a big load of fine sheep for the F. N. Gehl Packing Company. The island sheep and cattle are said to be in splendid condition, not having experienced the pasturage famine which prevails over the big ranges on the mainland.”


January 16, 1918 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz got in last night with forty barrels of wine from the island vineyards, and left this morning for the island with provisions.”


January 29, 1918 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came in this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of wine and other products of the island.”


February 24, 1918 [SCICo]: “The only way to reach the island is from Santa Barbara via our schooner Santa Cruz, which generally leaves Santa Barbara on Wednesday.”


February 26, 1918 [SBDNI]: “Brings Island Wine. The schooner Santa Cruz Island [sic], Captain Oliveras [sic], arrived from the island this morning with a cargo of wine for Montecito and other patrons. The island has had a heavy storm since Sunday before last, and both crop and stock conditions are looking fine.”


March 2, 1918 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived this morning from the island with a boat load of men called for the draft examinations. She also brought over some wine from the island vineyards.”


April 5, 1918 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday and left later in the day for the island with several sheep shearers.”


November 21, 1918 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the launch Santa Cruz discharged a cargo of wine at Stearn’s Wharf and later took on a load of merchandise for the island.”


December 20, 1918 [SBMP]: “With a cargo of wine on board, the schooner Santa Cruz came into port yesterday. Passage across the channel to Santa Cruz was reported as being comparatively smooth.”


February 14, 1919 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz unloaded 11 barrels of wine at the wharf yesterday afternoon.”


May 30, 1919 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday morning with a cargo of 400 sheep from the island, wind to the heavy ground swells, she was all day unloading.”


June 9, 1919 [SBDNI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived in port Thursday night with a cargo of island mutton for the market. Members of the crew state that commercial fishing in the island waters is very successful and that many smacks from San Pedro and other southern ports are arriving daily.”


June 12, 1919 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz tied up at the pier yesterday at 1 o’clock, with 126 sheep on board from Scorpion Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, for the Gehl Packing Company. The packing company had ordered twice that number, but the crew of the schooner stated that the heavy swells prevented them from transporting by small boats more sheep than they had on board. There is no wharf at Scorpion Harbor. They also reported the channel waters to be very rough all the way over. Gehl expressed himself yesterday as being under the impression that the price of lambs in the near future would soar still higher than the present $9 a head mark, due partly to the fact that the season is drawing to a close.”


June 12, 1919 [SBMP]: “The Caire family arrived in Santa Barbara yesterday from San Francisco. They expect to leave for the island this morning on the schooner Santa Cruz, to spend part of the summer on their ranch on Santa Cruz Island.”


June 18, 1919 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island at noon yesterday with 18 head of steers aboard for the Gehl Packing Company. Her crew announced that they expect to lift anchor for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow.”


June 27, 1919 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz docked alongside the pier opposite the warehouse yesterday noon. She carried a cargo of wine from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 20, 1919 [SBMP]: “Stearn’s Wharf had many different signs of life yesterday afternoon while the Santa Cruz was unloading 25 husky steers that had been brought over from Santa Cruz Island for the San Julian ranch in the mountains about 25 miles north of Santa Barbara. The load was the first of a series of shipments of cattle from the island for this ranch. The total number to be brought over will be about 200. The steers will then be placed in cars and continue their trip by rail. One of the steers caused a great deal of commotion when he decided to lie down. Several sharp twists on his tail made him decide to stand up. He finally fell in and marched away with the rest, much to the amusement of interested spectators.”


December 16, 1919 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner, Santa Cruz, arrived yesterday afternoon for a load of supplies for the cattlemen and other employees on the island.”


January 7, 1925 [SBMP]: “Captain Valdez to take bridge of Lippman’s boat. Captain Julius Valdez, who for many years has skippered the Santa Cruz Island schooner, Santa Cruz, has left the bridge of that vessel to go on as sailing master of L. R. Lippman’s new boat, formerly the Athene. Lippman, although of San Pedro, is now a member of the Santa Barbara Yacht Club, and has already entered his ship in the Honolulu race. Valdez will leave San Pedro with his boat for a month’s cruise along the Mexican coast with a party of Los Angeles men. Joe Bermudez succeeds Valdez as skipper of the Santa Cruz.”


November 18, 1928 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton has been in charge of the Santa Cruz Island boat, Santa Cruz, for the past week due to illness of Captain Joe Bermudez.”


February 10, 1926 [SBMP]: “Aged vaquero of island range ill. C. Espinosa, old time vaquero of Santa Cruz Island, arrived on the schooner Santa Cruz yesterday, in answer to the call of his brother Joe, 83, one of the oldest vaqueros of the island, who is critically ill in the home of his daughter in Santa Barbara...”


July 17, 1929 [SBMP]: “A flock of 300 sheep for Santa Barbara and Los Angeles butchers was brought into Santa Barbara harbor yesterday by the schooner Santa Cruz from Santa Cruz Island.”


June 17, 1930 [SBMP]: “The escape of a wild cow from a shipment being taken off the schooner Santa Cruz on Stearn’s Wharf created a panic yesterday among bathers on Cabrillo Boulevard.”


October 16, 1930 [SBMP]: “With 180 tons of grapes already unloaded in Santa Barbara from the Caire Ranch, the schooner Santa Cruz this morning will head for Santa Cruz Island to take on its seventh and final grape cargo of the year. The 30 tons of grapes to be brought here on the return trip will make a total of approximately 210 tons for the season, said by Captain Ira Eaton of the Santa Cruz, to be one of the largest annual shipments ever taken from the Caire Ranch.”


October 13, 1937 [SBNP]: “First of 10,000 head of sheep shipped to island. Fifty-one hundred head of sheep, half of a shipment of more than 10,000 head were being taken to the Santa Cruz Island ranch of E. L. Stanton yesterday aboard the schooner Santa Cruz and the larger Vaquero...”


April 6, 1938 [San Bernardino County Sun]: “Helpless Island Schooner saved. San Pedro, April 5.—The Coast Guard cutter Hermes and the tug Louis Black tonight reached the 70-foot schooner Santa Cruz adrift off the Southern California coast near Anacapa Island. The Hermes, arriving first, took the helpless schooner in tow to keep her from being driven onto the rocks until the tug arrived and towed her to Santa Barbara. Plight of the schooner Santa Cruz was relayed to the Coast Guard by Captain [Red] Craine by radio telephone. Also aboard the schooner were Edward L. Stanton, owner, and a party of friends. Stanton, owner of Santa Cruz Island, one of the group of Santa Barbara channel islands, uses the schooner to transport supplies and guests to the island.”


December 9, 1960 [SBNP]: “The 64-foot cargo boat Santa Cruz, which plied its way back and forth between Santa Cruz Island and Santa Barbara for more than 60 years, broke loose from her mooring at Prisoners' Harbor early this week and was smashed to pieces against the rocks... Stanton, who owns part of Santa Cruz Island, used the boat to carry cattle, sheep and supplies. The masts were eventually cut off and a diesel motor installed.”


December 6, 1960 while anchored at Prisoners’ Harbor during a nor'easter, the Santa Cruz parted her mooring and was wrecked on the rocks on the west side of the harbor. Some of her parts, including compass, anchor chain and cowl vents were salvaged.

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