Santa Rosa Island

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Santa Rosa Island

Santa Rosa Island (#117267) (1903-1915+), wood-hulled schooner designed by William Muller and built at the Banning Shipyard in Wilmington for Vail & Vickers of Santa Rosa Island. She served the island from 1903 until her sale in 1915. Vail & Vickers used Santa Rosa Island for their offshore business. In 1913 they had the Vaquero built, and Santa Rosa Island was sold for service in the South Pacific. Her captains included:

  • Captain Fred Widing (1903-1908)
  • Captain George Childs
  • Captain Alexander Smith (1910, 1911)
  • Captain Walton (1911)
  • Captain Bowen (1911)
  • Captain Morrow (1911)
  • Captain Johnson, (1912-1915) who became captain of the Vaquero



In the News~

June 2, 1903 [SBMP]: “The Brothers, a freight schooner, brought over a load of 549 sheep Sunday from Santa Rosa Island for the local markets. She will go to San Pedro today, when her captain, Fred Widing, will take command of the new schooner recently completed for Vickers and Vail, owners of Santa Rosa, to ply between this port and the island. The new vessel will be the largest of the local fleet, equipped with a 92-horse-power gasoline engine. She was recently launched at the Banning ship yards.”


June 3, 1903 [LAT/SCat]: “The Santa Rosa, a new two-masted schooner built by George Mueller [William Muller] at the Banning shipyards at Wilmington, came over today on her trial trip. She is designed to ply between the mainland and Santa Rosa Island for her owners, Messrs. Vail & Gates [Vickers], who also own the island of Santa Rosa.”


June 25, 1903 [SBMP]: “A band of 400 cattle was brought down yesterday morning from Los Alamos to be shipped to Santa Rosa Island. The new schooner Santa Rosa sailed in the afternoon with 200 head. The task of loading was a difficult one, and a large crowd gathered to watch it done. The boat set low in the water, the deck being about twelve feet below the wharf, making it necessary to drive the animals down a steep incline. One immense steer objected to going down the steep incline and, turning, suddenly made a leap from the wharf onto the deck, landing in the midst of his companions uninjured. The remainder of the herd will be taken over tomorrow.”


June 27, 1903 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the schooner Santa Rosa, belonging to Santa Rosa Island, arrived at the wharf with a load of horses and mules which have been raised at the island. Forty-two head were brought over and most of these will be shipped this morning to Los Angeles for sale…”


July 16, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of 404 sheep and 54 head of cattle for the local market. Messrs. Vail and Vickers, owners of the island, were passengers. They left last night for L.A.”


August 1, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Rosa Island brought in another load of mutton sheep last night, the shipment numbering 200 head. They came from Santa Rosa Island and will be used in the local meat trade.”


September 12, 1903 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island sailed for the islands this morning for the purpose of bringing back a load of fat sheep.”


October 7, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island came in light from the islands this morning.”


December 15, 1903 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island, which visited the island by that name in the channel, from San Pedro, and which touched at this port yesterday, has returned to San Pedro.”


December 24, 1903 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Rosa Island came over from the islands this morning with a cargo of hay for feeding to cattle soon to arrive here, while they are waiting for transportation across the channel.”


February 16, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “Another vessel has been added to the fleet of the Banning Company… The Cabrillo, in all her appointments, is a beautiful vessel… In addition to the vessel launched today, there has been built at the Banning shipyards the Warrior, Hermosa and Cricket for the company; the steamer Eureka built for the North Pacific Steamship Company, now in the passenger service between San Francisco and Eureka, and two smaller vessel, the Santa Rosa Island and Torqua. All these boats were designed and built under the supervision of William Muller…”


April 14, 1904 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of 300 sheep for William Ealand.”


April 29, 1904 [LAT/SCat]: “Avalon… The schooner Santa Rosa Island was due to arrive at San Clemente to carry away a cargo of sheep last Saturday. The sheep were corralled and had been waiting five days and the boys were dispatched here to send a wireless message to the vessel’s owners to learn the cause of the delay. Before noon they received the information that the schooner got stuck in the mud at San Diego on Friday and had not yet gotten off.”


June 21, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Sailed. Monday, June 20. Schooner Santa Rosa Island for Santa Rosa Island.”


June 22, 1904 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island came in yesterday morning from San Pedro with a load of telephone poles which were unloaded here. The boat then took on supplies and left for the islands.”


July 17, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Sailed. Saturday, July 16. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 20, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived. Tuesday, July 18. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 22, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “Sailed. Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 30, 1904 [LAH]: “Sailed. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Capt. Werden [Widing], for Catalina.”


July 31, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived. Saturday, July 30. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Catalina.”


August 8, 1904 [LAH]: “Marine Report August 7.—Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 20, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. List of vessels in port: Sunday, August 21. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent wharf.”


August 22, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. List of vessels in port: Friday, August 19. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent wharf.”


August 23, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. List of vessels in port: Monday, August 22. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent wharf.”


August 25, 1904 [LAT/SP]: “On the waterfront. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. List of vessels in port: Wednesday, August 24. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent wharf.”


October 2, 1904 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner, in charge of Captain Widing, left yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island with a gang of ten sheep shearers who will be employed the next two weeks shearing the sheep that are raised on the island. The schooner has just returned from San Pedro where she delivered a load of sheep from the island. Large numbers of sheep have been shipped from there lately, leaving only about 700 head.”


October 14, 1904 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner came in yesterday afternoon with a cargo of merchandise raised on the island. After unloading and taking on supplies, she will return to the island.”


October 15, 1904 [PRP]: “Island sheep shearing. The Santa Rosa Island schooner, in charge of Captain Widing, left recently for Santa Rosa Island with a gang of sheep shearers, who will be employed during the next two weeks shearing the sheep that are raised on that island. The schooner has just returned from San Pedro, where she delivered a load of sheep from the island. Large numbers of sheep have been shipped from there lately, leaving only about 7000 head.”


November 9, 1904 [LAH]: “Marine Report. Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Capt. Widing from Santa Rosa Island.”


November 16, 1904 [LAH]: “Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Capt. Widing, Santa Rosa Island.”


December 18, 1904 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island came in from the islands on Friday and took a cargo of cattle at Stearn's Wharf yesterday. These will be taken to Santa Rosa Island where they will be grazed and fattened for market.”


December 22, 1904 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa schooner left port yesterday with a cargo of 140 head of cattle for Santa Rosa Island. This is the last of 600 head of high grade cattle Vail & Vickers, the owners, have shipped to the island for breeding purposes.”


December 22, 1904 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the island of her name yesterday with a cargo of cattle. The island pastures are in excellent condition and a large herd of stock has just been shipped to the ranges across the channel.”


February 6, 1905 [LAT/SP]: “Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived. Sunday, February 3. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Goleta; List of vessels in Port. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent Wharf.”


February 9, 1905 [LAT/SP]: “Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. List of vessels in Port. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Crescent Wharf.”


March 16, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner was at the wharf yesterday morning taking on supplies and a gang of sheep shearers, who are to work on Santa Rosa Island for some time. She sailed before noon.”


April 7, 1905 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa in charge of Mr. Vickers, one of its owners, left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon. A number of vaqueros took passage on the boat for the island where they will participate in a rodeo of cattle. There are at present about 7000 head of cattle. Shipments will soon begin of cattle from the island consigned for Los Angeles and other southern points.”


May 10, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island steam schooner came in from the island yesterday.”


May 12, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island sailed yesterday morning after a cargo of sheep and cattle that have been feeding on Santa Rosa Island. The stock is for local markets.”


June 17, 1905 [SBMP]: “Captain Widing brought in a cargo of cattle yesterday on the power schooner Santa Rosa Island. The next several trips will be to Santa Barbara.”


June 20, 1905 [SBMP]: J. M. Vickers and S. P. Vickers, proprietors of the Los Angeles cattle firm of Vickers & Vickers, arrived in the city yesterday. They are accompanied by William Connelly, a representative of the Maier Packing Company, and C. W. Wells, another cattleman also from Los Angeles. They are stopping at the Arlington. The Vickers Company owns over 2000 head of cattle on Santa Rosa Island, which are regularly shipped to Los Angeles markets. It is understood that the deal has just gone through by which the Maier Company has purchased a large number of these cattle for market purposes, and the representatives of the firms are here to complete the work of transferring and shipping the stock. The schooner Santa Rosa Island is expected in from the islands with several carloads of stock within a day or two. Some shipments have been made to San Pedro, but this course has proved to be too slow for the purchasers, and it has been decided to ship from this city in the future.”


August 6, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widney [Widing], arrived yesterday from San Pedro. She has been engaged in transporting cattle from the island to the Los Angeles market.”


December 17, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island was in port yesterday for the purpose of taking a load of cattle from this city to Santa Rosa Island. Two trainloads of stock were shipped from Arizona by Vail & Vickers of Los Angeles, and the stock will be fattened on the native grasses of that island.”


December 20, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island was in port yesterday morning taking on cattle to be fed on that island. Two live elk, a fine pair of antlered beauties, were also taken aboard the ship for transportation to Santa Rosa. These will be added to the herd of fifteen live elk now feeding on that island. The Santa Rosa schooner will sail early this morning for the islands.”


December 22, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island returned from its home port yesterday afternoon in order to take another load of cattle which are waiting in the stock yards adjoining Stearn’s Wharf. She has taken over to Santa Rosa Island several boatloads already and has many more to transfer before the large shipments being made by Vail & Vickers from Deming, New Mexico, are all landed on the island.”


December 28, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island started for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning with a load of cattle, but returned to anchor after running out a few miles, owing to the condition of the channel.”


January 2, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Rosa Island sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning with another load of cattle. Many cattle are being taken to the grazing grounds on this island to be fattened for Vail and Vickers, Los Angeles stockmen.”


April 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island steam schooner was also in port yesterday on one of her regular business trips to this city.”


May 14, 1906 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Rosa left this morning for Santa Rosa Island, after having been here for a couple of days, carrying a number of carpenters and a miscellaneous assortment of supplies. The schooner is expected to return to Santa Barbara tomorrow with a cargo of cattle that have been purchased by local dealers.”


May 18, 1906 [LAH]: “Arrived. Steamer Santa Rosa Island, Santa Rosa.”


June 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island left yesterday with a cargo of cattle to be taken today to San Pedro.”


July 29, 1906 [SBMP]: “The launch Irene returned from San Miguel Island yesterday noon in charge of Ira Eaton. The Irene left last Thursday with Captain Waters, who went over to gather together a few hundred head of sheep for shipment in the schooner Santa Rosa Island to Port Los Angeles. The shipment will be made on Tuesday. The Irene left for Santa Cruz Island last night with a party of fishermen on a pleasure cruise.”


August 29, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Rosa is expected to arrive from Santa Rosa Island late this afternoon. The trip is being made for the purpose of taking a number of carpenters to the island, where several small buildings are to be constructed. She will also take back a quantity of building materials and general supplies.”


August 31, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from the other side of the channel late yesterday afternoon, bringing a cargo of sheep for shipment to the Los Angeles market. The boat was expected to have reached this port a couple of days ago, but was delayed in departure from her island port.”


September 12, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island has arrived from Santa Rosa Island, having come for the purpose of taking on a number of men and supplies.”


September 13, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, which arrived from the island from which it takes its name yesterday afternoon, is at the commercial wharf taking on a large number of bundles of walnut sacks consigned to J. F. More of Goleta. The sacks will be discharged at More’s Landing a few miles north of this city…”


November 22, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived last evening from across the channel. The schooner has been at San Pedro for some time, but was brought up to the island last week and will be engaged for some time in carrying cattle across from the mainland. Three trainloads of cattle are due from Vail & Vickers Arizona ranches, for the island range.”


November 23, 1906 [SBMP]: “Island trade in full swing. Trade with the islands is in full swing at the present time, notwithstanding the rough weather. This morning, unless there is a turn for the worse in the condition of the channel, will begin the shipment of cattle to Santa Rosa Island, the first consignment of Arizona stock for Vail and Vickers’ island ranges having arrived. The cattle were taken on the wharf last evening, and will be loaded on the Santa Rosa schooner early this morning, about 200 head being carried each trip…”


November 25, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner sailed for the other side of the channel yesterday with her second cargo of Arizona cattle. Of the first lot of 732 head, about half has now been transported to the island. Another trainload is expected Tuesday night.”


December 4, 1906 [SBMP]: “The crew of two men on the Santa Rosa Islandv schooner struck [went on strike] yesterday because of a disagreement with the first mate. They were soon replaced and the schooner was not long delayed. The boat is engaged in transporting cattle from the mainland to the island, and the last cargo will probably be taken across the channel today.”


December 6, 1906 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa is lying at anchor in the harbor awaiting the arrival of a trainload of cattle from Deming, Arizona, for the Vail & Vickers company, for shipment to Santa Rosa Island, where they will be fattened for market. It has been expected that the cattle, about 750 head, would be in Santa Barbara some time yesterday, but word was received from the south that they would not be here for a day or two. The island schooner will remain in port until the cattle arrive.”


December 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa took on her second load of cattle yesterday and sailed for Santa Rosa Island, which is to be stocked with young stock from Deming, Arizona by Vail and Vickers for the purpose of having them fattened for the market. A couple of more trips will be necessary before nearly 800 head will have been taken from the corral near the foot of the commercial wharf. Other shipments are expected to be made within a few days and they will be continued until at least 2500 head will have been brought north and sent to the island.”


December 27, 1906 [LAT/SP]: “Shipping. Arrived Wednesday, December 26. Schooner Santa Rosa Island from San Diego… The little schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from San Diego with a cargo of coal for the Crescent Company.”


January 17, 1907 [SBWP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, belonging to Vail and Vickers of Santa Rosa Island, arrived from the island day before yesterday. She came from San Pedro to the island, and after taking on a number of cattlemen who were there to handle the last shipment of cattle sent over some weeks ago, made this port with her passengers.”


April 22, 1907 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Rosa arrived here Sunday night from San Pedro and left yesterday for the islands where she will take on about 200 head of cattle to the sea port town.”


May 11, 1907 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island came in Thursday from the islands and returned yesterday with supplies.”


May 30, 1907 [SFCall]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, has been chartered to transport several head of cattle from Santa Rosa Island to the mainland.”


June 1, 1907 [SBMP]: “The San Pedro correspondent of the Los Angeles Examiner notes that the little power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, has a long task ahead this summer. On the island of the same name lying some fifty miles northwest of Santa Barbara, are kept some 14,000 head of cattle which are now in the very best of marketable condition, and probably 12,000 of them are to be brought to this port during the summer for the little schooner to bring them all here, as a larger vessel can not get up to the dock of the island. About 80 very large steers can be brought at each trip, or a much larger number of smaller steers. It was from this island a few years ago that 100 head of cattle were shipped to Chicago, which averaged a ton apiece, and not one of them had ever tasted a morsel of grain. A shipment of this kind and weight was never known before at that great island.”


June 7, 1907 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from the islands this afternoon with a cargo of beef cattle for the State Street marker.”


June 30, 1907 [LAT]: “Captain Fred Widing, master of the schooner Santa Rosa Island, which arrived this morning from the island of that name with a cargo of cattle, picked up F. Trader, who was adrift in an open boat which was leaking badly. Trader had lost his oars.”


June 30, 1907 [SFCall]: “Captain Fred Widing of the schooner Santa Rosa Island from the island of the same name arrived today with a cargo of cattle. Captain Widing picked up F. Trader off Santa Rosa Island adrift in an open boat, which was leaking badly. He had been visiting relatives on San Miguel Island and had gone out on a fishing trip. He had accidentally lost his oars and was at the mercy of the waves when rescued by Captain Wilding.”


August 6, 1907 [LAT]: “When the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, was returning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of cattle about a week ago, one particularly big fat steer was overcome by a feeling of homesickness and, being lothe to leave the good pastures of his former home, leaped overboard from the schooner and ’steered’ for shore. At the time, the schooner was about three miles out, and a heavy rough sea was running, and darkness had come on. Captain Widing never expected to see the steer again, and charged him up to profit and loss, but when the Santa Rosa Island returned to the island last Friday for another load, his steership was one of the first inhabitants to welcome the vessel. Yesterday the Santa Rosa Island returned here and the steer was one of the steer-age passengers.”


September 10, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in yesterday with the third cargo of sheep from Santa Rosa Island, for the Ealand Packing Company.”


November 13, 1907 [SBMP]: “The pretty power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, said he came over for a load of cattle in from Arizona. The cattle had not yet arrived in this city, but they are expected at any moment. Captain Widing reported rough weather off the islands.”


November 15, 1907 [SFCall]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, has gone to Santa Barbara, where the vessel will be employed for a month transferring 8,000 cattle from the mainland to Santa Rosa Island. The shipments are being made by Vail & Vickers of Los Angeles.”


November 19, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, is lying at anchor off the commercial wharf awaiting the arrival of a shipment of 2,000 head of cattle from Vail & Vickers’ ranch at Tucson, Arizona, consigned to grazing lands in Santa Rosa Island where they will be fattened for the market on the luscious grass.”


November 22, 1907 [SBI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Rosa Island, arrived from the islands this morning with 60 head of beef cattle for the State Street market. The cattle, instead of being dumped off in the ocean and made to swim ashore, were driven through a chute to the wharf.”


May 2, 1908 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. May 1. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from San Miguel Island with a cargo of wool, arrived today.”


May 17, 1908 [LAH]: “San Pedro. Captain Widing of the steam schooner Santa Rosa Island has returned from Santa Rosa Island, whither he went a few days ago with three Denver cattlemen. The stockmen inspected the cattle and placed an order for a shipment of 2000 head. Captain Widing made an effort to get the steam schooner Capistrano enlisted in the services, but information from the owners was couched in negative terms, as they stated their belief that a special license was required for the transfer of cattle.”


May 22, 1908 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. May 21. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, departed for Santa Rosa Island this evening to bring cattle to the mainland. The cattle are consigned to the Maier and Cudahy packing companies and shipments will be made until 2000 head are transferred.”


May 26, 1908 [LAT]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Santa Rosa Island, brought in eighty head of cattle consigned to the Maier Packing Company of Los Angeles.”


May 26, 1908 [LAH]: “San Pedro, May 25. Four tons of sardines brought by sloop Alpha, 250 sheep by power schooner Edith, eighty head cattle by power schooner Santa Rosa.


May 30, 1908 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. May 29. The power steamer Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, from Santa Rosa Island, brought a cargo of cattle.”


June 3, 1908 [SBI]: “The Santa Rosa Island boat is busy making trips from the island to San Pedro these days shipping fat cattle to the markets of the southern part of the state. Never in the history of the island have cattle been in better condition than the beef cattle now being shipped from this ranch.”


August 1908 according to Fred Caire: “the machinery of the power schooner Santa Cruz needed repair, so the Santa Rosa Island was used to haul several boat loads of sheep off Santa Cruz Island.”


August 9, 1908 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. August 8. Schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, arrived from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of cattle for Los Angeles.”


August 18, 1908 [SPDN]: “Several boat loads of sheep will be shipped to Santa Barbara next month [from Santa Cruz Island]. The large schooner Santa Rosa, owned by the Santa Rosa Island Company, will be chartered for this purpose.”


August 30, 1908 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island steamer arrived yesterday with thirty head of fine beef cattle for the Ealand market. The stock was fat from the splendid grazing on the island.”


August 31, 1908 [SBI]: “Four Santa Barbara Chinamen returned from Santa Cruz Island this morning on the large cattle schooner, Santa Rosa, which they had chartered to carry to this city one of the largest shipments of abalone shells and cured abalone meat ever taken from the Santa Barbara Islands in a single season. The party has been in camp on the south side of Santa Cruz Island for three months. The cargo which is being unloaded today consists of 12 tons of shells, worth $50 per ton, six tons of cured abalone meat valued at $160 per ton, and two tons of sea grass, which Chinese people use in manufacture of a condiment that is exceedingly popular with the Celestials. The four Chinamen will earn nearly $2000 as the result of their three months’ work. The party was managed by Ah Poy and financed by You Kee, a merchant on Canon Perdido Street. The 12 tons of abalone shells, packed into 500 gunny sacks, were purchased today by G. M. McGuire of this city, who will ship them to factories where they are made into ornaments including buttons, cuff buttons, and trinkets. The abalone meat, which was cured by the Chinamen on the island, will be sold to San Francisco and shipped either to Honolulu or China. Abalone meat is popular both with Japanese and Chinese.”


September 12, 1908 [SFC]: “San Pedro. September 11. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, has arrived from San Diego, having been on the ways for cleaning and painting.”


September 4, 1908 [LAH]: “San Pedro. The steamer Santa Rosa Island sailed into port today with 450 sacks of abalones on board, which have been gathered on Santa Rosa Island during the past six or eight months by a bunch of Chinamen who have been living there and make a business of catching and drying them. They are a most valuable article and are considered a choice delicacy by the Orientals. The cargo is valued at the rate of $10 per sack, or $4500 for the entire lot. In addition to this are the shells, which are also very valuable, as there is always a big demand for them at the curio stores.”


September 12, 1908 [SFC]:


November 23, 1908 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Widing, arrived from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of horses, mules and cattle.”


April 10, 1909 [SBMP]: “The Vails of Santa Rosa Island are entertaining a house party who sailed over on the schooner Santa Rosa on Wednesday, after waiting several days for the weather to calm down. They took saddle horses with them and a jolly outing was anticipated. The schooner returned for a supply of vegetables and other provisions and left for the island yesterday.”


April 22, 1909 [SBI]: “Frank Pepper, superintendent of Vail & Vickers cattle range on Santa Rosa Island, arrived from the island yesterday. Mr. Pepper expects the arrival of the gasoline launch Santa Rosa late this afternoon with 100 head of beef cattle for the State Street market. A cargo of 300 sheep will arrive early next week for the same market. Mr. Pepper expects to ship 2500 head about May 10 to the Los Angeles markets. The cattle are reported in the finest of condition.”


June 24, 1909 [LAH]: “Schooner Santa Rosa Island cleared today for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 10, 1909 [LAH]: “San Pedro, July 5. Arrived. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 14, 1909 [SBI]: “Fred F. Caire, of San Francisco, who with other members of the Caire family hold the title to Santa Cruz, largest of the Santa Barbara group of islands, announced today that it may be necessary to establish a patrol along the shores of the island and eject all campers who do not hold permits from the family of the management… Several boatloads of sheep will be shipped to Santa Barbara next month. The large schooner, Santa Rosa, owned by the Santa Rosa Island Company, will be chartered for this purpose…”


October 12, 1909 [SBI]: “Manager Frank Pepper of the Santa Rosa Island Company will return from Arizona in a few days with several trainloads of cattle for stocking the Santa Rosa Island ranch. They will be transported from Santa Barbara to the island in the company’s power schooner, the Santa Rosa.”


October 30, 1909 [SBMP]: “L. E. Carrillo arrived here from Benson, Arizona yesterday with a carload of cattle for Vail & Vickers of Santa Rosa Island. The cattle will be taken to the island in the Santa Rosa Island schooner and pastured there during the winter and spring.”


October 30, 1909 [SBI]: “A carload of cattle belonging to Vickers and Vail of Santa Rosa Island will be taken to the island on the schooner Santa Rosa and pastured there during the winter. The stock was brought from Benson, Arizona by L. E. Carrillo, who arrived in Santa Barbara yesterday.”


November 2, 1909 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner arrived yesterday with a load of fattened steers for the Ealand Packing Company. They brought over 200 head of steers.”


November 5, 1909 [SBI]: “The Santa Rosa Island boat took over another shipment of cattle this morning. Three thousand cattle for grazing purposes.”


November 16, 1909 [SBMP]: “The last boatload of cattle for Santa Rosa Island was taken over in the Santa Rosa schooner on Sunday. These were shipped from Arizona and will be sold next year after being fattened on the island. Members of the firm of Vail & Vickers, owners of the island, went over yesterday to remain for several days in an inspection of their property.”


March 7, 1910 [LAH]: “Sailed. Schooner Santa Rosa Island for San Miguel and Santa Rosa Island.”


April 8, 1910 [SBMP]: “John F. More returned Wednesday from a visit to Santa Rosa Island, which formerly belonged to the More estate. He made the trip in the Santa Rosa Island schooner.”


April 15, 1910 [LAH]: “Two barges of livestock arrived today. The power schooner Edith brought 266 head of sheep from San Clemente Island for the San Clemente Wool Company, and the power schooner Santa Rosa Island brought three cars of horses from Santa Rosa Island for Vail & Vickers. The Edith sailed for another cargo today.”


May 27, 1910 [SPDN]: “Crew members of the Dora Bluhm which wrecked on the south side of Santa Rosa Island were rescued by the schooner Santa Rosa Island.”


May 28, 1910 [LAH]: “San Pedro. May 27. For the third time in eighteen years Captain Alex. Smith of the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, this morning brought a shipwrecked crew of eight men to this port from a vessel lost on the rocks of Santa Rosa Island. The three-masted schooner Dora Bluhm was wrecked Wednesday night at 8:10 o’clock while on the way to this port, seven days from Coos Bay with 350,000 feet of lumber for the Golden State Lumber Company. All hands were saved. The crew was picked up eight miles south of Anacapa Island last night at 7 o’clock after twenty-two hours in an open boat without food or water. They were wet to the skin and nearly exhausted from hard work at the oars to keep from drifting onto the rocks…”


May 27, 1910 [SBI]: “The gasoline power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived here late this morning with Captain Oscar Johnson and the crew of the schooner Dora Bluhm, which was wrecked last Wednesday night on the south side of Santa Rosa Island, in Santa Barbara, about thirty miles off shore from Santa Barbara. The crew of the wrecked schooner had been adrift in an open boat twenty-two hours when picked up by the island boat. The Bluhm was bound from Coos Bay to San Pedro, with 350,000 feet of lumber, for the Golden State Lumber Company. She was owned by the Pacific Trading Company of San Francisco…”


June 9, 1910 [LAH]: “San Pedro, June 8. Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 21, 1910 [LAH]: “Captain Smith of the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, who arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of cattle, reports having spoken to the tug Hercules with log raft in tow for San Diego June 18 at 3 P.M., three miles north of Anacapa Island.”


June 25, 1910 [LAH]: “San Pedro, June 24. Fears for the safety of V. W. Owen, George Willett, O. W. Howard, Anthony Jay and J. S. Appleton were relieved this afternoon when the launch Nedra arrived today from Santa Rosa Island where the party was detained for more than a week, Captain E. Hall being unable to land because of a strong northwester and heavy seas. The party left Los Angeles June 4, intending to pass ten days on the island gathering Indian relics and bird specimens for the Natural History and Ornithological Club of Los Angeles. It was their intention to leave the island June 15. After the work had been completed the party waited day after day for the storm to abate. Harry Lelande, N. N. Love and A. P. Howard were members of the original party, but left the island before the storm was at its height and reached home safely. The other members of the party secured provisions from the power schooner Santa Rosa Island and from the only ranch house on the island.”


June 25, 1910 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Smith, arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with seventy-five head of sheep.”


July 9, 1910 [SFCall]: “Los Angeles. July 8. Arrived. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 23, 1910 [SFCall]: “Los Angeles. July 22. Arrived. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 30, 1910 [SFCall]: “Los Angeles. July 29. Arrived. Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 30, 1910 [LAH]: “San Pedro, July 29. Arrived. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island. With one of the last cargoes of the season the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Smith, arrived this morning with 78 head of cattle from Santa Rosa Island. Mearly 3000 cattle have been shipped from the island this summer, and there are only a few more to bring to the mainland. These are all being taken by Los Angeles packers.”


August 17, 1910 [LAH]: “San Pedro, August 16. Arrived. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 24, 1910 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island will sail tonight for San Diego to go on the ways and proceed to Santa Barbara to load piles for Santa Rosa Island. Under command of Captain Alex Smith, the schooner has made forty-five trips to Santa Rosa Island this summer, bringing 3500 head of cattle for delivery to Los Angeles packers by Vail & Vickers, owners of the island.”


August 31, 1910 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Smith, returned from San Diego today, where she went on the marine ways to be cleaned and painted. She will load posts for Santa Rosa Island.”


September 4, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner was in port yesterday loading piles for repairs to the wharf at the island’s port, Beechers Cove. Frank Pepper, manager of the island, was a passenger on the boat.”


October 19, 1910 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island will sail for Santa Barbara Thursday and will make a number of trips between that port and Santa Rosa Island to transport 4000 head of calves.”


October 22, 1910 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa arrived here from the islands for a cargo of gasoline. She will sail today but will return Monday for a load of cattle which will be taken over to Santa Rosa Island.”


October 25, 1910 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa arrived here this morning with a cargo of 120 sacks of wool from Santa Cruz Island, each sack weighing 350 pounds. She will make several other trips bringing over 500 sacks by Sunday. The schooner Santa Rosa made two trips between here and Santa Rosa Island, one Monday and one this morning, transporting 200 head of cattle from the mainland. These cattle are brought from Arizona and New Mexico.”


October 23, 1910 [SBMP]:Santa Rosa Island schooner was here yesterday receiving supplies and preparing to commence transporting cattle to the island from the mainland.”


October 27, 1910 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island is engaged in the transportation of cattle from the mainland to the island. Two voyages have already been completed, and the vessel will be in today for another cargo of 200 head of stock. The cattle area brought from Arizona ranges of Vail & Vickers Company owning Santa Rosa.”


November 15, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island power schooner started for Beechers Bay yesterday with a cargo of cattle, but was forced to put back. A northwest wind sweeping down the channel made the voyage unsafe with livestock aboard.”


November 23, 1910 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island sailed yesterday for Bechers Bay with a cargo of Arizona cattle which will be fattened on the island grass.”


November 30, 1910 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island had a strenuous time yesterday attempting to land 200 Arizona cattle at Becher’s Bay on the island. The schooner finally put back to Santa Barbara after battling all day with the elements, and unloaded the cargo at the wharf in order to give the animals feed and water... There will be no further attempts at cattle transportation across the channel until the outside weather moderates.”


September 4, 1910 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island power schooner was in port yesterday loading piles for repairs to the wharf at the island’s port, Beechers Cove. Frank Pepper, manager of the island, was a passenger on the boat.”


November 2, 1910 [SBI]: “Two hundred head of cattle were shipped to Santa Rosa Island Tuesday morning on the schooner Santa Rosa.”


November 7, 1910 [SBI]: “A ship load of cattle was taken to the islands on the schooner Santa Rosa this morning.”


November 9, 1910 [SBI]: “Another load of cattle were transported on the Santa Rosa this morning to the islands. These cattle are being placed upon the pasture lands of Santa Rosa Island for the purpose of fattening them for the market in and about Santa Barbara.”


December 1, 1910 [LAT/SB]: “With 200 Arizona cattle aboard, the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, had a strenuous time yesterday attempting to land at Beecher’s Bay on the island. After several hours it was finally decided to give up, and the boat returned to Santa Barbara. A stiff northwester was blowing and there was a tremendous ground swell. The vessel reached the bay without much trouble, but its difficulties were insurmountable when it attempted tie up to the island wharf. Two hawsers were parted and the boat was nearly capsized several times. Fearing that the valuable cargo might be dumped overboard, the boat returned to the mainland. Every year several hundred cattle are taken from Arizona to the island where they are fattened for the market.”


April 26, 1911 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa of Santa Rosa Island will soon be engaged in the annual movement of fat cattle from the island ranges of Vail & Vickers to the California markets. This takes place in the spring months, and in the fall, the ranges are stocked with cattle from the Arizona ranches of the firm. The schooner left for the island Sunday.”


May 5, 1911 [OC]: “The port of Hueneme is becoming a shipping point of considerable importance. This week the power schooner Santa Rosa disembarked two hundred head of cattle at the wharf, which were brought from the ranges on Santa Rosa Island.”


May 12, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Thursday May 11. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Smith, from Santa Rosa Island… The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, with a cargo of cattle for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


May 12, 1911 [SFCall]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. May 11. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of cattle for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


May 24, 1911 [SFCall]: San Pedro, May 23. The movement of cattle and sheep to this port has already begun, five carloads having been shipped today. The power schooner Edith, plies to San Clemente, the Warrior to Catalina and the Santa Rosa to the island of the same name.”


June 6, 1911 [SFCall]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. June 5. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


June 8, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Monday, June 5. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walters [Walton], from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 8, 1911 [SFCall]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro. Arrived Wednesday, June 7. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 78 head of cattle for Los Angeles consignees.”


June 9, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday June 9. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Cruz Island… The steamer Helen P. Drew… cleared this afternoon for Santa Cruz Island to discharge 90,000 feet of lumber and posts.”


June 10, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday June 16. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Cruz Island… The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, bringing three carloads of cattle for the Los Angeles market.”


June 11, 1911 [SFCall]:San Pedro. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 78 head of cattle for Los Angeles consignees.”


June 17, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday June 16. Steamer [schooner] Santa Rosa Island, Captain Bowen, from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 17, 1911 [SFCall]:San Pedro. June 16. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, bringing 70 head of cattle for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


June 17, 1911 [LAH]: “Some heavy shipments of cattle and sheep to the Los Angeles markets were made the first of this month from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 20, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro, June 19. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from Santa Rosa Island with three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles consignees.”


June 22, 1911 [LAT]: “San Pedro, June 21. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from Santa Rosa Island bringing 78 head of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


June 22, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Wednesday June 21. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.


June 24, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. June 23. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


June 27, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. June 26. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 78 head of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


June 29, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Wednesday, June 27. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 29, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. June 28. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island bringing three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


July 1, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday June 30. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island… The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, bringing seventy-eight head of cattle for Los Angeles wholesalers.”


July 8, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday July 7. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island… The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, bringing three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


July 8, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 7. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island bringing three carloads of cattle for Los Angeles packers, and the steamer Warrior, from Catalina Island, brought 300 sheep.”

July 11, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 10. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 78 head of cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


July 13, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 12. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with three carloads of cattle.”


July 15, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 14. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 79 head of cattle for Cudahy packing company.”


July 18, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday July 14. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 18, 1911 [LAH]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island with 80 head of cattle for Cudahy packing company.”


July 18, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Monday, July 17. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 18, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 17. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived this morning from Santa Rosa Island with 80 head cattle for the Cudahy Packing Company.”


July 20, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 19. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island carrying 80 head of cattle for Cudahy packing company.”


July 22, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 21. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island carrying 80 head of cattle for Cudahy packing company.”


July 22, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Friday, July 21. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 25, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Monday, July 24. Power launch Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 27, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 26. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island carrying 80 head of beef cattle for Cudahy Packing company.”


July 29, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 28. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island carrying 80 head of beef cattle a packing company of Los Angeles.”


August 3, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Wednesday, August 2. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Walton, from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 5, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. August 4. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from Santa Rosa Island with 80 head of beef cattle for the Cudahy Packing company of Los Angeles.”


August 15, 1911 [LAT]: “Shipping. Port San Pedro, Los Angeles. Arrived Monday, August 14. Power schooner Santa Rosa Island, Captain Morrow, from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 15, 1911 [SFCall]: “Shipping. Coming from foreign ports. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island bringing 80 head of beef cattle for the Cudahy Packing Company of Los Angeles.”


August 24, 1911 [SBMP]: “The transportation of 3000 or 4000 sheep from San Miguel Island to the Cudahy plant at Los Angeles will begin at once, the power schooner Santa Rosa being chartered for the purpose. The sheep will be taken off on lighters and thence loaded into the schooner.”


September 2, 1911 [SBMP]: “Captain Borgenson with his wife and part of the crew [of the wrecked Comet] made their way in a small boat to Santa Rosa Island and were brought to this city yesterday morning by manager Frank Pepper of the Santa Rosa Island Company and his powerful schooner Santa Rosa Island.”


September 3, 1911 [LAT]: “The second mate of the three-masted sailing schooner Comet, wrecked on San Miguel Island Thursday night, was drowned Friday afternoon, according to information brought to this city today by the crew of the launch Miramar… Captain Borgenson, with the seven survivors of the crew, sailed today for San Pedro on the schooner Santa Rosa Island.”


September 17, 1911 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. September 16. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from Santa Rosa Island bringing 350 head of sheep for the Cudahy Packing company at Los Angeles.”


September 28, 1911 [LAT/LB]: “C. B. Linton, who owns pearl and abalone concessions on San Nicolas and Santa Barbara islands, this morning purchased of Judge A. C. Lawson the launch Flyer, which he will use in transporting his shells to the mainland. Captain George Childs, formerly of the schooner Santa Rosa Island, will be in command.”


November 1, 1911 [SBI]: “The Santa Rosa schooner sailed yesterday afternoon for Santa Rosa Island with 200 head of young cattle.”


November 7, 1911 [SBI]: “The Santa Rosa Island boat returned this morning to take out another 200 head of cattle for the island pastures and will leave tomorrow. This will make the third lot of 200 that have been shipped to Santa Rosa Island. On the last trip over the Santa Rosa [Island] had a narrow escape from being left to the mercy of the waves. Her engine broke down just before she touched the wharf on the island, allowing her to drift in. If the break had occurred a half hour before it would have been a serious matter with the load of cattle aboard.”


November 9, 1911 [SBI]: “Another 1000 head of cattle arrived here this morning from Arizona. They will be shipped from here to Santa Rosa Island on the schooner Santa Rosa [Island], which is expected back some time today. She took over a cargo of over 200 head yesterday.”


November 19, 1911 [SBMP]: “The steamer Santa Rosa Island called yesterday for a bunch of young Arizona cattle, which is being transported to Santa Rosa Island. Earlier in the week the Santa Rosa was compelled to return to this port with a number of cattle, as the high wind that prevailed at the islands several days made it impossible to land the cargo. The cattle were later landed. During the last few days the winds have been more in evidence at the island along the mainland which is somewhat sheltered. As these winds have invariably been from the east or north their full force has been felt at the islands which are more than 20 miles from here.”


March 8, 1912 [SBI]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner arrived here yesterday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island. It will remain in port a day or two.”


April 5, 1912 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner this week brought Vail & Vickers ranch 18 bulls and one stallion, for shipment to the Alisal Ranch between Gaviota and Santa Ynez, the stock having been purchased by Mr. Murphy, owner of the ranch.”


July 26, 1912 [LAT]: “Port San Pedro. Los Angeles. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived today from Santa Rosa Island, bringing seventy-five head of beef cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


July 27, 1912 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. July 26. Power schooner Santa Rosa arrived today from Santa Rosa Island bringing 75 head of beef cattle for Los Angeles packers.”


August 25, 1912 [SBMP]: “The transportation of 1400 head of beef cattle from Santa Rosa Island to Santa Barbara for the Hobson Brothers of this city and Ventura, began yesterday, the power schooner Santa Rosa Island arriving with a deck load of steers. The schooner is expected to make two trips today and several more during the week. The landing of the first load yesterday was marked by an unusual incident, when one of the wild creatures jumped overboard and headed directly for his island domain. He was swimming off, briskly enough when a cowboy-sailor in a skiff was sent in pursuit. The nautical steer puncher finally roped the brute, and then calmly towed him to the beach.”


August 28, 1912 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner has now landed four cargoes of cattle from the island ranges, consigned to Hobson Brothers. Yesterday, two steers jumped overboard, but were recaptured after much difficulty, one of them nearly going under before he was towed to the beach.”


September 6, 1912 [OC]: “Oxnard bound cattle stampede on board ship. A stampede of the cattle which are being transported by Hobson brothers from the Santa Cruz Islands to the local corrals resulted in a considerable amount of excitement, according to reports from Santa Barbara… Trampled to death during a rough voyage from Santa Rosa Island to this port, on the auxiliary schooner Santa Rosa Island, the carcasses of two steers were consigned to the deep after the vessel had discharged the living portion of the cargo. Captain Johnson, commanding the schooner, stated thast it was the roughest voyage he had ever experienced between the island and Santa Barbara, and the swells that were then running onto the beach here bore out the declaration that in mid-channel the sea was boisterous. The schooner brings about 100 head of stock on each trip, and in the herd yesterday were a number of yearlings. The deck is divided into numerous small corrals, holding from ten to twenty head, but the animals are closely crowded. , Yesterday, during the heavy rocking of the boat, some of the smaller steers slipped prostrate to the deck, and were trampled by the other stock. Two of them, as stated, were killed, and two others were more or less injured, but were removed from the schooner by the main strength of several longshoremen and deck-hands. The two carcasses were taken back to mid-channel on the return voyage, and there thrown over the side of the schooner. The Santa Rosa schooner has several more trips to make with cattle, but will wait now until the first of the week. A large steam schooner will be in port today with sheep from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 9, 1912 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. “San Pedro. September 8. Schooner Santa Rosa Island arrived from Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of beef cattle and cleared on the return trip tonight.”


September 12, 1912 [SFCall]: “San Pedro. September 11. Steamer [schooner] Santa Rosa Island from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 28, 1912 [LAT]: “Schooner Santa Rosa Island sailed for San Diego with cargo cement.”


July 27, 1913 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa Island Company is just placing in commission at San Pedro, a fine new vessel, christened the Vaquero, which will take the place of the power schooner that has been in service for several years on the channel and in the coastwise trade. This latter vessel, bearing the name Santa Rosa Island, will be sold by Vail & Vickers interests, controlling the island property. Captain Johnson, who has been in command of the Santa Rosa Island schooner, is now on the Vaquero, which has recently been completed at the Banning shipyards. The Santa Rosa Island arrived here yesterday with a new master. She will sail this morning for San Miguel Island with Captain Waters and a party of herdsmen, who will round up several thousand sheep for shipment to this port. Beef cattle being the leading product of Santa Rosa Island, a vessel larger than the old schooner can be used to advantage in transporting them. Notwithstanding all precaution, it was sometimes possible for steers to leap from the deck of the schooner to the sea. The new boat will soon be utilized for shipping several hundred head of cattle from the islands. The Vaquero is 160 feet long, and has 300 horsepower gasoline engines. She will also be used, as has the Santa Rosa schooner, in the cement trade between San Pedro and Santa Barbara, and will be available for other lines of commerce. It is said that she is also well fitted for passenger carrying.”


July 29, 1913 [LAT]: “Absolutely the greatest deal which has been consummated in the moving picture world in half a decade was closed yesterday when incorporation papers were signed and sent to Sacramento, creating Bosworth Incorporated. At the helm will be no less a personage than Hobart Bosworth, actor of distinction… Behind the concern are the millions of Frank A. Garbutt, treasurer. Active work is to begin at once, and the first film which the new concern will produce will be that great story, The Sea Wolf. It will cost no less than $50,000 to reproduce this great story on the screen… The greatest asset of the new company is its contract with Jack London, whereby it has exclusive control, as far as the screen is concerned… The deck of the Santa Rosa Island on which the Sea Wolf will be staged.”


August 27, 1913 [SBMP]: “Island schooner new pirate ship. Jack London’s Sea Wolf is being portrayed on the south coast. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, so frequently seen in Santa Barbara Harbor, has been transformed into a pirate ship for moving picture purposes, and is now terrorizing the peaceful inhabitants of the south coast. Re-christened the Ghost, and commanded by Captain Larsen, the Sea Wolf, the old gasoline schooner is doing duty in the portrayal of Jack London’s famous story. Hobart Bosworth has a contract with London for the reproduction of the Sea Wolf in moving pictures, and financial backing of Frank Garbutt to the extent of $50,000, which, it is estimated, the film will cost…”


November 13, 1913 [SBMP]: “Hanging by her teeth, the power schooner Santa Rosa Island last night rode out a mild southeast blow, anchored not far from the end of the [Santa Barbara] pier, with her hold full of sheep and with a deck load, on one side, of sheep, and on the other cattle. The Santa Rosa Island had arrived off the pier at 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon, and after maneuvering around for half an hour, Captain Black decided that to make a landing would be dangerous, the unloading of the livestock at the ‘apron’ being next to impossible with such a choppy sea. One large roller swerved the schooner against the wharf nearly tearing away the bowsprit, and breaking two of the bobstays. With that, the master abandoned hope of discharging his cargo before morning, and rather than recross the channel in the face of the storm, dropped anchor to await the prospect of better weather. The cattle and sheep come from Santa Rosa Island and are for delivery to local markets. The gradual abatement of the storm during the night gave promise that the landing could be made early today. Had the blow increased, as it threatened at one time, the outcome would have been extremely problematical.”


November 14, 1913 [SBMP]: “Flying A cowboys assisted in unloading the cattle from the island schooner Santa Rosa, which had been laying outside the wharf twenty-four hours waiting for a chance to land. The eight cowboys did this partly as an accommodation to the Santa Rosa folks, and also to add a bit of excitement to the taking of moving pictures. Thomas Ricketts directed the taking of 300 feet of film to be used in an interesting story. It was a fortunate thing that the picture was planned as the cowboys proved a great help, as the heavy sea made it very difficult to land the cattle. About sixty sheep were dead when the schooner landed them, and this is where the Flying A boys proved themselves as adept and a bit more than the ordinary pictures cowboys. Pictures were taken of the schooner nearing the wharf and about everything that transpired until the cattle were in the corral on the wharf. The Santa Rosa had a very troublesome time. She came across the channel during a storm on Wednesday, but because of the heavy swells found it impossible to land. So she beat about outside until late yesterday afternoon. Mr. Ricketts held the camera in waiting all day yesterday and as soon as he was informed the vessel was to land, he shot his outfit down in an automobile.”


December 4, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa Island is due here today with a cargo of cement from San Pedro. The Santa Rosa on her last visit here, Monday, was unable to discharge all of her cargo, because of a heavy southeast swell.”


December 15, 1913 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Rosa Island this morning completed unloading 2300 sacks of cement here, having cleared from San Pedro. After a trip to the islands the vessel will bring up another load of cement.”


December 15, 1913 [SBDN]: “The private launch of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pepper was today towed to Santa Rosa Island by the schooner Santa Rosa Island, Mr. and Mrs. Pepper being aboard. Mr. Pepper is superintendent of the island. He and Mrs. Pepper go over to reside during the winter.”


May 4, 1914 [LAT/SP]: “Cattle shipments from Santa Rosa Island have also begun, several cargoes having been brought in by the power schooners Santa Rosa Island and Vaquero. Sheep are no longer raised on Santa Rosa Island, all the animals having been shipped a few years ago and cattle substituted.”


March 1915: “One day in March a small auxiliary schooner named Santa Rosa Island came into port [Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Mexico] for a short visit. She was owned by some brothers named Vail from Los Angeles, who were taking a leisurely cruise through the Gulf and along the Mexican coast, hunting, fishing, and doing a little sight-seeing—following no particular timetable and rolling along to suit their own whims. Though the schooner was not short-handed, the Danish cook was somewhat susceptible to a deal offered by three of the restless able seamen on the Wandsbek… For the rest of the night the trio of runaways hid in the forepeak locker of the Santa Rosa Island, only the Danish cook knowing anything of their presence. Sunrise came all too soon and, with the light of day, the little schooner had another visitor. Captain Burmeister, seeing this small strange vessel in port and wonering about the three missing seamen, paid a visit to Captain Johnson of the Santa Rosa Island. ‘Why thery’re not here, Captain,’ was the sincere reply. Within hours, the Santa Rosa Island was under way, heading out to sea through the line of ballasted square-riggers…’ On March 9th we sailed out of Santa Rosalia Bay,’ Hugo Petersen recalled years later, ‘very close to the old Wandsbek. Through a porthole we saw the skipper and the mate watching our ship through glasses, sliding by. After we were well away from shore, we came out to meet the captain. When he got over his surprise, he and the owners decided to take us along. After a beautiful fishing and hunting trip all around the Gulf, we arrived in San Pedro on 23 May 1915…” [Huycke, Jr., Harold D. To Santa Rosalia and Back, The Mariners Museum, Newport News, Virginia, 1970]


May 31, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa arrived in port last night from Beechers Bay, Santa Rosa Island.”


July 15, 1915 [SBDNI]: “The power schooner Santa Rosa, owned by Vail & Vickers, has been sold to Captain L. T. Ward of Alameda, according to a report from San Pedro. She will be used in the South Sea island trade. The Santa Rosa has for years been used by the owners of Santa Rosa Island to carry cattle from the island to Santa Barbara and other coast points.”


July 15, 1915 [SBMP]: “Santa Rosa Island schooner is sold: September craft goes from cattle trade to South Sea Islands. The power schooner Santa Rosa Island, according to the San Pedro Pilot in its issue of last Tuesday, is going into a new and faraway field. The Pilot says: 'Captain L. T. Ward of Alameda, who is well known in San Pedro as the skipper who sailed the yacht Mollilou in the first Honolulu race, was here yesterday to take the power schooner Santa Rosa Island to San Francisco. The old schooner long in the cattle trade from the island for which she was named, has been sold by Vail & Vickers to a San Francisco firm and will be used in the South Seas island trade.”


November 7, 1915 [LAT]: “News has been received here of the safe arrival at Tahiti of the power schooner Santa Rosa Island, long a familiar sight at this port. The schooner was owned by Vail & Vickers and for years was used to transport cattle from Santa Rosa Island until replaced by the Vaquero, a larger and more modern boat. The schooner was recently sold to new owners for use as a regular trader in the South Sea Islands. Captain L. T. Ward took the little schooner on the long journey accompanied by his wife. They have returned to San Francisco on the steamer Maitai. The run to the islands was made in fine time.”