Difference between revisions of "BLACK OYSTERCATCHER"

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'''1903 Anacapa Island:'''  “On the 4th of September, 1903, I was landed from a yacht onto Ana Capa Island... My stay on the Island was limited to less than an hour; but besides that I was permitted to coast along nearly the whole length of the island in a small boat....Besides the usual seabirds of the region I saw the following: one pair, with three two-thirds grown young, of the Black Oystercatcher (''Hæmatopus bachmani'') on a point of rocks jutting into the surf...”
 
<br> [[GRINNELL, Joseph|Grinnell, Joseph]]  [https://sora.unm.edu/node/94909 ''Some Birds of Ana Capa Island''] The Condor 10(3):130, May-June 1908
 
  
  
'''1907 Santa Cruz Island:'''  “''Haematopus bachmani''. Black Oystercatcher. December 1 to 8 seven specimens were seen and five secured, at Northwest ,Harbor. They were always observed on the outer rim of volcanic rocks standing in the surf, or on the rocky ‘‘islands’’, and were hard to secure. The feet and legs of specimens taken, are pale flesh color instead of red as in breeding season. On December 3 I shot an oystercatcher which fell in the heavy surf. Unable to secure it myself I had started tentward for my retriever when I was greatly chagrined to see a bald eagle swoop down, gather in my prize and carry it away.” [“At 11:30 p. m., November 19, 1907, my father (H. Linton), Mr. George Willett, and myself left San Pedro harbor in a dilapidated fishing smack and in company with a crawfisherman, one “Cold-foot” Jorgensen. We arrived off the south end of Santa Cruz Island at 10:30 the following day during a stiff norwester. For various reasons we were unable to make camp until the 22nd. It may not be amiss to state here that twice during the blow we were nearly wrecked: once while at anchor in Potatoe Harbor, a broken anchor allowing the boat to drift within the breaker line and nearly onto the rocks. In this instance the timely arrival of Willett and H. Linton in a small boat, saved the day, and incidentally the fishing smack. At another time (the engine having broken down) we were blown nearly onto the rocks of Anacapa Island; but with father at the wheel and Willett and I on the “sheet” we managed to hold her off. I mention the foregoing, and the many sleepless nights spent on the rocky shores, “running” the surf several times each day (with attendant duckings), etc., merely as a warning to those who seem inclined to believe a field naturalist’s life “strewn with roses”. (Its ’ generally strewn with cacti!)”]<br> [[LINTON, Clarence Brockman|Linton, C. B.]] [https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v010n03/p0124-p0129.pdf ''Notes from Santa Cruz Island'']] The Condor 10(3):124-129, May 1908
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* [[#ANACAPA ISLAND|ANACAPA ISLAND]]
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* [[#SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND|SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND]]
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* [[#SAN MIGUEL ISLAND|SAN MIGUEL ISLAND]]
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* [[#SANTA BARBARA ISLAND|SANTA BARBARA ISLAND]]
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* [[#SANTA CRUZ ISLAND|SANTA CRUZ ISLAND]]
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* [[#ISLA CEDROS|ISLA CEDROS]]
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* [[#ISLAS CORONADOS|ISLAS CORONADOS]]
  
  
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* [[#ANACAPA ISLAND|ANACAPA ISLAND]]
 
* [[#SAN MIGUEL ISLAND|SAN MIGUEL ISLAND]]
 
* [[#SANTA BARBARA ISLAND|SANTA BARBARA ISLAND]]
 
* [[#SANTA CRUZ ISLAND|SANTA CRUZ ISLAND]]
 
  
  
* [[#ISLA CEDROS|ISLA CEDROS]]
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* [[#ISLAS CORONADOS|ISLAS CORONADOS]]
 
  
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===== ANACAPA ISLAND =====
  
  
<h2 id="mp-tfa-h2" style="margin:3px; background:#3B9661; font-size:120%; font-weight:bold; border:1px solid #3B9661; text-align:left; color:#000000; padding:0.2em 0.4em;"></h2>
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'''1903 Anacapa Island:'''  “On the 4th of September, 1903, I was landed from a yacht onto Ana Capa Island... My stay on the Island was limited to less than an hour; but besides that I was permitted to coast along nearly the whole length of the island in a small boat....Besides the usual seabirds of the region I saw the following: one pair, with three two-thirds grown young, of the Black Oystercatcher (''Hæmatopus bachmani'') on a point of rocks jutting into the surf...”
 +
<br> [[GRINNELL, Joseph|Grinnell, Joseph]]  [https://sora.unm.edu/node/94909 ''Some Birds of Ana Capa Island''] The Condor 10(3):130, May-June 1908
  
===== ANACAPA ISLAND =====
 
  
  
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<h2 id="mp-tfa-h2" style="margin:3px; background:#3B9661; font-size:120%; font-weight:bold; border:1px solid #3B9661; text-align:left; color:#000000; padding:0.2em 0.4em;"></h2>
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===== SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND =====
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 +
 +
'''1984 San Clemente Island:''' “ Seal Cove is the only known breeding site on San Clemente Island for black oystercatchers (''Haematopus bachmani'').”  ''Recovery Plan for the endangered and threatened species of the California Channel Islands'' published by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon 1984.
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<h2 id="mp-tfa-h2" style="margin:3px; background:#3B9661; font-size:120%; font-weight:bold; border:1px solid #3B9661; text-align:left; color:#000000; padding:0.2em 0.4em;"></h2>
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===== SAN MIGUEL ISLAND =====
 
===== SAN MIGUEL ISLAND =====
  
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===== SANTA BARBARA ISLAND =====
 
===== SANTA BARBARA ISLAND =====
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===== SANTA CRUZ ISLAND =====
 
===== SANTA CRUZ ISLAND =====
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'''1907 Santa Cruz Island:'''  “''Haematopus bachmani''. Black Oystercatcher. December 1 to 8 seven specimens were seen and five secured, at Northwest ,Harbor. They were always observed on the outer rim of volcanic rocks standing in the surf, or on the rocky ‘‘islands’’, and were hard to secure. The feet and legs of specimens taken, are pale flesh color instead of red as in breeding season. On December 3 I shot an oystercatcher which fell in the heavy surf. Unable to secure it myself I had started tentward for my retriever when I was greatly chagrined to see a bald eagle swoop down, gather in my prize and carry it away.” [“At 11:30 p. m., November 19, 1907, my father (H. Linton), Mr. George Willett, and myself left San Pedro harbor in a dilapidated fishing smack and in company with a crawfisherman, one “Cold-foot” Jorgensen. We arrived off the south end of Santa Cruz Island at 10:30 the following day during a stiff norwester. For various reasons we were unable to make camp until the 22nd. It may not be amiss to state here that twice during the blow we were nearly wrecked: once while at anchor in Potatoe Harbor, a broken anchor allowing the boat to drift within the breaker line and nearly onto the rocks. In this instance the timely arrival of Willett and H. Linton in a small boat, saved the day, and incidentally the fishing smack. At another time (the engine having broken down) we were blown nearly onto the rocks of Anacapa Island; but with father at the wheel and Willett and I on the “sheet” we managed to hold her off. I mention the foregoing, and the many sleepless nights spent on the rocky shores, “running” the surf several times each day (with attendant duckings), etc., merely as a warning to those who seem inclined to believe a field naturalist’s life “strewn with roses”. (Its ’ generally strewn with cacti!)”]<br> [[LINTON, Clarence Brockman|Linton, C. B.]] [https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v010n03/p0124-p0129.pdf ''Notes from Santa Cruz Island'']] The Condor 10(3):124-129, May 1908
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Latest revision as of 08:00, 7 November 2019

BLACK OYSTERCATCHER (Haematopus bachmani)


BLACK OYSTERCATCHER (Haematopus bachmani)


CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS



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1899. Swarth, H. S. Black Oystercatcher on Anacapa Island



ANACAPA ISLAND

1903 Anacapa Island: “On the 4th of September, 1903, I was landed from a yacht onto Ana Capa Island... My stay on the Island was limited to less than an hour; but besides that I was permitted to coast along nearly the whole length of the island in a small boat....Besides the usual seabirds of the region I saw the following: one pair, with three two-thirds grown young, of the Black Oystercatcher (Hæmatopus bachmani) on a point of rocks jutting into the surf...”
Grinnell, Joseph Some Birds of Ana Capa Island The Condor 10(3):130, May-June 1908


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Anacapa Island H. E. Wilder HSU June 24, 1894 HSU 5637 Haematopus bachmani Bird
Anacapa Island H. S. Swarth CAS June 4, 1899 CAS-34817 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Anacapa Island Joseph Grinnell CAS September 4, 1903 CAS-31949 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Anacapa Island H. W. Wright CAS July 5, 1912 CAS-74130 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Anacapa Island H. W. Wright CAS July 5, 1912 CAS-74132 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Anacapa Island H. W. Wright CAS July 5, 1912 CAS-74133 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Anacapa Island D. R. Dickey WFVZ May 25, 1913 WFVZ-63682 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Anacapa Island (Cat Rock) S. B. Peyton WFVZ June 11, 1915 WFVZ-81951 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Anacapa Island Charles Ashworth & R. E. Thompson WFVZ May 15, 1927 WFVZ-27565 Haematopus penicillatus Eggs
Anacapa Island L. G. Peyton & D. S. DeGroot WFVZ June 2, 1928 WFVZ-58941 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Anacapa Island (Cat Rock) J. R. Pemberton WFVZ May 19, 1929 WFVZ-2543 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Anacapa Island S. B. Peyton WFVZ May 21, 1932 WFVZ-206163 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Anacapa Island S. B. Peyton WFVZ May 25, 1941 WFVZ-206166 Haematopus bachmani Eggs


SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND

1984 San Clemente Island: “ Seal Cove is the only known breeding site on San Clemente Island for black oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani).” Recovery Plan for the endangered and threatened species of the California Channel Islands published by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon 1984.



SAN MIGUEL ISLAND
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
San Miguel Island W. P. Trowbridge NMNH January 1856 USNM-A4625.4185301 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island George Davidson ANSP (1871?) ANSP-26566 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island George Davidson ANSP (1871?) ANSP-26567 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island (Prince Island) J. S. Appleton WFVZ June 15, 1910 WFVZ-112761 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
San Miguel Island George Willett WFVZ June 17, 1910 WFVZ-3567 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
San Miguel Island H. W. Wright CAS July 12, 1912 CAS-74129 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island Chester Lamb MVZ September 20, 1927 MVZ-51467 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island Chester Lamb MVZ September 20, 1927 MVZ-51468 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island Chester Lamb MVZ September 20, 1927 MVZ-51469 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island Chester Lamb MVZ September 22, 1927 MVZ-51585 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island J. E. Green MVZ September 29, 1927 MVZ-51586 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island Chester Lamb MVZ September 29, 1927 MVZ-173464 Haematopus bachmani Birds
San Miguel Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ June 3, 1928 WFVZ-58942 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
San Miguel Island (Prince Island) J. E. Green SDNHM April 30, 1938 SDNHM-17922 Haematopus bachmani Birds


SANTA BARBARA ISLAND
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Barbara Island J. G. Cooper MVZ June 1863 MVZ-1955 Haematopus bachmani Eggs


SANTA CRUZ ISLAND

1907 Santa Cruz Island:Haematopus bachmani. Black Oystercatcher. December 1 to 8 seven specimens were seen and five secured, at Northwest ,Harbor. They were always observed on the outer rim of volcanic rocks standing in the surf, or on the rocky ‘‘islands’’, and were hard to secure. The feet and legs of specimens taken, are pale flesh color instead of red as in breeding season. On December 3 I shot an oystercatcher which fell in the heavy surf. Unable to secure it myself I had started tentward for my retriever when I was greatly chagrined to see a bald eagle swoop down, gather in my prize and carry it away.” [“At 11:30 p. m., November 19, 1907, my father (H. Linton), Mr. George Willett, and myself left San Pedro harbor in a dilapidated fishing smack and in company with a crawfisherman, one “Cold-foot” Jorgensen. We arrived off the south end of Santa Cruz Island at 10:30 the following day during a stiff norwester. For various reasons we were unable to make camp until the 22nd. It may not be amiss to state here that twice during the blow we were nearly wrecked: once while at anchor in Potatoe Harbor, a broken anchor allowing the boat to drift within the breaker line and nearly onto the rocks. In this instance the timely arrival of Willett and H. Linton in a small boat, saved the day, and incidentally the fishing smack. At another time (the engine having broken down) we were blown nearly onto the rocks of Anacapa Island; but with father at the wheel and Willett and I on the “sheet” we managed to hold her off. I mention the foregoing, and the many sleepless nights spent on the rocky shores, “running” the surf several times each day (with attendant duckings), etc., merely as a warning to those who seem inclined to believe a field naturalist’s life “strewn with roses”. (Its ’ generally strewn with cacti!)”]
Linton, C. B. Notes from Santa Cruz Island] The Condor 10(3):124-129, May 1908


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Henshaw NMNH June 4, 1875 USNM-72428.4406453 Haematopus bachmani Birds
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ May 23, 1937 WFVZ-37334 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Santa Cruz Island L. T. Stevens SBMNH May 26, 1940 SBMNH-21670 Haematopus bachmani Eggs


ISLA CEDROSS
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Isla Cedros P. I. Osburn AMNH March 10, 1911 AMNH-131429 Haematopus bachmani Birds


ISLAS CORONADOS
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Islas Coronados G. C. Robbins WFVZ May 6, 1897 WFVZ-124804 Haematopus bachmani Eggs
Islas Coronados H. W. Wright CAS June 24, 1908 CAS-74126 Haematopus bachmani Birds