Bonita

From Islapedia
Bonita
Bonita grounded

Bonita (#3162) (1881-1930), part of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company’s fleet, a 180-foot “narrow gauge” wooden steamer of 521 tons, built by the Dickie Brothers in San Francisco in 1881 for general cargo, and as a passenger carrier. According to Santa Cruz Island Company records, Bonita serviced Santa Cruz Island for at least 16 years between 1882 and 1898, the year of her last documented island trip. A 1900 advertisement in the Santa Barbara Daily Press stated her regular run from Newport to San Francisco stopped in San Pedro, Port Hueneme, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Gaviota, Port Harford, Cayucos, San Simeon, Monterey, and Santa Cruz. Additional freight stops included Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands as needed. Bonita worked primarily from San Francisco south, and seldom left Southern California. In 1908 she was sold to Cia Naviera del Pacifico in Guaymas, Mexico, and in 1926 she was sold to the Mexican government. Bonita was scrapped in 1930.



In the News~

August 15, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Pacific Coast Steamship Company has just launched a freight steamer for the Southern Coast route. The new vessel, which is said to be a model of beauty, was built almost entirely of Oregon pine, the stern and rudder posts being of hard wood. She is 180 feet in length, 27 feet beam, 16 feet hold, and is 600 tons burden. The engine is a compound surface condensing one, high pressure 28, and low pressure 34 pounds. Some of the single timbers composing the kelson and waterways are 110 feet in length. The vessel is receiving the finishing touches, and will be ready for sea in about eight days. Her pretty appearance and graceful lines attract considerable attention, and Captain Goodall was so struck with her beauty on first seeing her that he promptly decided to christen her the Bonita, which is acknowledged to be most appropriate. The entire cost of the steamer, ready for sea, will amount to about $70,000.”


August 20, 1881 [SBWP]: “Her pretty appearance and graceful lines attract considerable attention. Captain Goodall was so struck by her beauty on first seeing her that he promptly decided to christen her the Bonita.”


August 29, 1881 [SBDP]: “The new steamer Bonita, Captain Leland, called here this morning, and took sixty-nine hogs for San Francisco, belonging to Captain J. Mayhew, and then went to Goleta for 100 tons of grain.”


May 31, 1882 [SBDP]: “J. B. Joyaux, superintendent of the Santa Cruz Island Co., came over to Santa Barbara last Saturday. He reports the shearing all finished for the season. The sheep are in fine condition, and 12,000 have been sold. They will be transferred to San Francisco by installments, 1000 at a time. The steamer Bonita stops at the island on the 3rd of June to carry away the first thousand.”


August 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “Good fishing. Yesterday some of the members of the Union Club had a fishing test. Messrs. Bates, Winchester, and Eddy sailed in Jack’s boat. Messrs. Broome, Knapp and Culbertson sailed in Larco’s sloop. Each boat fished about four hours. The party in Jack’s boat caught 75 fish. Those in Larco’s boat caught 54 fish. Only barracudas and bonitas were caught, weighing from three to eighteen pounds each. The combined catch weighed over 200 pounds.”


April 6, 1884 [SBI]: “A review of Santa Barbara shipping... At present, besides the Queen of the Pacific now running regularly the Ancon, Eureka, and Los Angeles and every week an additional freight steamer leaves San Francisco for the southern coast and for special loads when freight accumulates the Bonita, the Newport and another small steamer calls when required. The regular steamers stop at nine ports…”


March 2, 1885 [DAC]: “Sailed. March 1. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, Santa Cruz Island.”


March 24, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 32 hours, from Santa Rosa Island, livestock to Goddall, Perkins & Co.”


April 6, 1885 [SBDP]: “Dr. Knox was summoned to Santa Rosa Island last Saturday morning to attend A. P. More who was reported to have been seriously injured by a fall from his horse. The captain of the schooner, who returned with the doctor this morning, reports that Mr. More’s injury was simply a sprain of one of his ankles and that he left yesterday for San Francisco on the steamer Bonita.”


April 7, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


April 7, 1885 [DAC]: “Importations. Santa Rosa Island. Per Bonita. 1820 sheep, 250 lambs.”


April 21, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. April 20. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 40 hours from Santa Rosa Island; 1747 sheep, 3221 lambs, to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


May 18, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. May 17. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 36 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock, etc, to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


June 10, 1885 [SBDI]: “The steamer Bonita is expected to visit the islands next week for freight, to convey it to San Francisco.”


June 15, 1885 [SBDI]: “The steamer Bonita arrived this morning, coming direct from San Diego… She goes from here to Santa Rosa Island and thence to the city. We learn that she is soon to go to the Arctic on a hunting expedition.”


July 12, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. July 11. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 31 hours from Santa Rosa Island; 2000 sheep to Lawrence & Levy.”


August 9, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. August 8. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 30 hours from Santa Rosa Island; 1955 sheep to Lawrence & Levy.”


August 27, 1885 [DAC]: “Arrived. August 26. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


August 27, 1885 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 68 cattle, 125 tons asphaltum, 20 calves, 83 hogs, 1020 sheep, 6 bundles pelts.”


June 21, 1886 [SBDI]: “Steamer Bonita is expected in Wednesday, when she will steam for Santa Rosa Island for a cargo of wool. She will convey the same to San Francisco.”


November 21, 1889 [DAC]: “Arrived. November 20. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 48 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; livestock and produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


November 21, 1889 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. From Santa Rosa Island. 1950 sheep .”


May 15, 1890 [DAC]: “Sailed. Steamer Bonita. [Captain] Leland. Santa Rosa Island.”


May 16, 1890 [DAC]: “Among the vessels which sailed yesterday… the steamer Bonita (Leland), for Santa Rosa Island…”


May 20, 1890 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita will leave this morning for Santa Rosa Island for a cargo of wool for San Francisco.”


May 29, 1890 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. From Santa Rosa Island. 758 bags of wool, 3 bundles sheep pelts.”


October 2, 1890 [SFCall]: “Arrived. October 1. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 48 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


October 2, 1890 [DAC]: “Arrived. October 1. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


October 2, 1890 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1624 sheep, 97 lambs.”


October 20, 1890 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1672sheep.”


November 19, 1890 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita touched at the wharf yesterday afternoon and took on board Lawrence More and went to Santa Cruz Island for a load of sheep.”


November 29, 1890 [DAC]: Arrived. November 28. Steamer Bonita, [Captain Leland], 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock and produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


November 29, 1890 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1820 sheep, 6 bundles pelts.”


December 6, 1890 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita came in port Thursday night to avoid the storm. She laid at the wharf until yesterday when she went to Santa Cruz Island to get a cargo of sheep to take to San Francisco.”


December 9, 1890 [SFCall]: “A few days ago word was received here by telegraph that the steamer Undine had been lost in the Santa Barbara Channel and her crew of three drowned. Captain Tribble of the steamer Santa Cruz, which arrived on Sunday, reported that he had sighted the wreck and endeavored to rescue on of the crew who was clinging to the vessel, but was unsuccessful. Captain Leland of the steamer Bonita, which arrived yesterday, states that on the passage up he called at Santa Rosa Island, and Captain Moore, the superintendent there, told him that on Tuesday evening last he saw a schooner-rigged vessel, with mainsail and two jibs set, blow up and take fire. This was undoubtedly the Undine. She was run by means of an electric motor, the power being generated by means of naphtha or gasoline, and thus, no doubt, exploded. The Undine plied between Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz Island.”


March 26, 1891 [SFCall]: “Arrived Wednesday, March 25. Steamer Bonita, Leland, 34 hours from Santa Rosa Island; produce, etc. to Goodall, Perkins & Co. Importations. Santa Rosa Island per Bonita — 1522 sheep, 10 lambs.”


March 26, 1891 [DAC]: “Arrived March 25. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 34 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock and produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


March 26, 1891 [DAC]: “Importations. Per Bonita. From Santa Rosa Island. 1522 sheep, 10 lambs.”


April 14, 1891 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1504 sheep.”


May 12, 1891 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1880 sheep.”


May 12, 1891 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Monday, May 11. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 30 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock and produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


May 12, 1891 [DAC]: “Arrived. May 11. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Leland, 30 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; livestock and produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


September 3, 1892 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita stopped at the wharf yesterday and took J. F. More and Dave Culver, the wharfinger of Goleta, aboard. The passengers were taken to Santa Rosa Island.”


April 11, 1892 [SFCall]: “The steamer Bonita is at Santa Rosa Island searching for the sailor supposed to have landed there from the King James’ boat. The search of San Miguel Island was fruitless.”


April 13, 1893 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita brings news of the rescue of the sailor, William Spence, who went ashore on the 3rd at Santa Rosa Island from the small boat of the burned King James to seek water, and who had to be left. He reached the camp of sheep herders on the island, and the tug Fearless took him away on the 8th.”


April 13, 1893 [SDU]: “San Diego, April 12. The steamer Bonita brings the news of the rescue of the sailor, William Spence, who went ashore on the 3rd at Santa Rosa Island from a small boat of the burned King James to seek water, and who had to be left. The story is that he became so exhausted that he fell asleep and did not wake for twelve hours. He then started on a search and reached a camp of six sheepherders working for A. P. More, who owns the island. The tug Fearless took him away on the 8th.”


September 3, 1894 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Sunday, September 2. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Anderson, 78 hours from Santa Cruz Island and way ports; produce, etc. to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


September 6, 1894 [SBDI]: “The steamer Bonita arrived this morning about 4 o’clock… She then left for More’s Landing where she took on about fifty piles for Santa Rosa Island.”


November 7, 1894 [LAH]: “The Winfield Scott was a modern side-wheel steamer and was built on the Atlantic coast early in the fifties for the San Francisco and Panama trade. In 1852 she arrived on the Pacific coast, after a successful voyage around the Horn crowded with miners eager to get started in the gold fields of California. She discharged her cargo and landed her passengers and started south for Panama with about 200 passengers who were returning to the east with the products of their labors in the mines. During a fog on the voyage down the coast the steamer ran over a reef that juts out from Anacapa Island. Most of the passengers reached the shore in safety, but there was no shelter on the island, and from the time the vessel struck until they were rescued a storm kept shipwrecked people drenched to the skin. Provisions were scarce, and they were in about the last stages of starvation when the steamer California came along and took them on board. The California was on her way up from Panama, and the passengers who escaped the wreck were brought back. When the San Pedro began her work of recovery, 44 years later, four fathoms of water covered the wreck. The hull was almost covered by sand, but there was an open space about the machinery, so that the wreckers could get at the more valuable parts of the ancient steamer. Many large castings were brought to the surface, and what was recovered from the old wreck was brought up on the steamer Bonita.”


September 11, 1895 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Monday, September 10. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Anderson, 33 hours from Santa Rosa Island and way ports; produce, etc. to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


September 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The steamer Bonita was expected to stop at Santa Cruz Island today on her way north, to take on a cargo of wool and several barrels of wine.”


October 8, 1895 [SFCall]: Arrived. Monday, October 7. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 50 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


October 25, 1895 [SFCall]: Arrived. Thursday, October 24. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 36 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


November 24, 1895 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Saturday, November 23. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 36 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


December 5, 1895 [SFCall]: “Arrived. December 4. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 30 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


December 5, 1895 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 55 tons asphaltum, 103 head cattle, 368 bales wool.”


December 16, 1895 [SFCall]: “Arrived. December 15. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 33 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


December 17, 1895 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 110 head steers.”


December 25, 1895 [SFCall]: “Arrived. December 24. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 30 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


February 4, 1896 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Monday, February 3. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 36 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


February 13, 1896 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Wednesday, February 12. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


February 23, 1896 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Saturday, February 22. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Smith, 22 hours from Santa Rosa Island, etc.; produce to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


June 22, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The steamer Bonita will go to Santa Cruz Island tomorrow, and ship a cargo of sheep for San Francisco…”


July 9, 1896 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita — Santa Cruz Island — 1138 sheep.”


August 12, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “H. G. Goodall of San Francisco was visiting friends here today. He came down on the steamer Bonita with Captain George Conway for an outing on Santa Cruz Island. The Bonita is down for a cargo of wool from the islands…”


September 3, 1896 [SFCall]: “Importations. Santa Rosa Island. Per Bonita. 1068 sheep.”


September 11, 1896 [SFCall]: “Importations. Santa Rosa Island. Per Bonita. 1850 sheep.”


October 1, 1896 [SFCall]: “Importations. Santa Rosa Island. Per Bonita. 812 sheep.”


October 6, 1896 [SBDN]: “The steamer Bonita is engaged in placing anchor buoys in the channel for the Stearn’s Wharf Company.”


October 10, 1896 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 420 sheep.”


April 22, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The steamer Bonita was fog-bound for two days in the channel this week. She was trying to go to the islands after livestock.”


May 18, 1897 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Monday, May 17. Steamer Bonita, [Captain] Nicholson, 29 hours from Santa Rosa Island; livestock, etc. to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


May 18, 1897 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 171 sacks wool, 1016 sheep, 39 steers.”


August 9, 1897 [SFCall]: “Arrived. Sunday, August 8. Steamer Bonita, Nicholson, 32 hours from Santa Rosa Island: produce and livestock to Goodall, Perkins & Co.”


August 9, 1897 [SFCall]: “Importations. Per Bonita. Santa Rosa Island. 1227 sheep, 75 goats, 1 iron kettle.”


January 30, 1898 [LAT]: “The Hueneme correspondent of the Ventura Free Press says: ‘The old steamer Eureka of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, which has plied up and down this coast for the past fifteen years, has been withdrawn, and will be abandoned on account of age. Eureka is an ancient craft, and one with an interesting career of more than thirty years… She is now succeeded by the Bonita.”


August 27, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The steamer Bonita of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company’s line, was at the wharf here all day on account of the breaking of the forward shaft-crank off Point Conception Friday night. The vessel reached this port with difficulty…”


November 19, 1890 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita touched at the wharf yesterday afternoon and took on board Lawrence More and went to Santa Cruz Island for a load of sheep.”


October 21, 1901 [SBI]: “A new steamship is being built by the Union Iron Works for the Pacific Steamship Company, which, it is reported, will be put on the run between San Francisco and San Diego as soon as she is completed. She is nearly ready for service except that her machinery is yet to be placed. It is reported that she will take the place of the Bonita, and will be a faster and larger boat.”


April 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “Rear Admiral Goodrich’s fleet sailed northward yesterday morning... According to naval courtesy several of the boats in the harbor responded to the admiral’s departing signal, but the steamer Bonita was so busy loading on freight that she overlooked the signal and did not answer for several minutes, then some interested party told the captain that he was forgetting something.”