CARLSEN, Kristopher

From WikiName
Jump to: navigation, search
Kris Carlsen


CARLSEN, Kristopher Evens (c. 1983-2010), drowned while diving for lobsters on the west end of Santa Cruz Island.




In the News~

December 4, 3010 [VCS]: “Lobster diver goes missing off Santa Cruz Island. The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for a 27-year-old man who didn't resurface while lobster diving this morning with his father. Christopher [sic] Carlson [sic] went missing about 10:30 a.m. just north of Fraser Point off Santa Cruz Island, said Coast Guard Lt. George Kolumbic. He had been doing a 20-foot dive for about an hour and a half when he failed to resurface. "We've been searching since then," Kolumbic said. By 10:30 p.m., eight searches had been conducted using a helicopter out of Los Angeles, a Coast Guard cutter out of Santa Barbara and a 47-foot motorized life boat from Channel Islands Harbor. Carlson was wearing a black wet suit, SCUBA gear and a silver oxygen tank. "We're going to search throughout the night with the cutter and in the morning we will have the helicopter back up," Kolumbic said. "We're also going to have Ventura and Santa Barbara sheriffs divers going out there checking under the surface." The water temperature was 55 degrees at 10:30 p.m., Kolumbic said.”


December 5, 3010 [VCS]: “Body of missing diver found off Santa Cruz Island. The search for a 27-year-old who went missing while diving for lobster off Santa Cruz Island on Saturday came to a tragic end Sunday when rescue divers found his body in an underwater cave. According to the Coast Guard in Los Angeles, a Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department diver located the body of Kristopher Carlsen in the cave sometime after noon Sunday. The Coast Guard cutter Blackfin, one of the search vessels, took Carlsen's body to Santa Barbara. The cause of the accident is unknown, according to the Coast Guard. Known as "K.C." to his friends, Carlsen was diving with his father off the vessel Golden Child just north of Fraser Point on Saturday. He was reported missing around 10:30 a.m., failing to resurface from a 20-foot dive after an hour and a half, according to the Coast Guard. He was wearing a black wet suit, scuba gear and a silver oxygen mask. The search continued Sunday with a Coast Guard helicopter out of Los Angeles; the cutter Blackfin, out of Santa Barbara; a 47-foot rescue boat from the Coast Guard station at Channel Islands Harbor; two small boats from the National Park Service; and divers from the Ventura County and Santa Barbara Sheriff's departments. Carlsen was an experienced captain and lobster diver. On different websites targeting sportsfishermen, Carlsen posted photos and stories about diving for lobsters, or "bugs," at locations such as San Miguel and Santa Cruz. Carlsen loved the water, spending the past summer captaining on offshore charter boat in Alaska, according to friend and fellow Alaska charter captain Andy Martin. Martin feared the worst since he heard the news that Carlsen was missing. "He was just a great person," Martin said. "He loved to fish. He loved to be on the water. He loved to share the outdoors with other people... to help other people experience the thrill of being out there on the water." Steve Brown, owner of Alaskan Anglers Inn and Deep Blue Charters where Carlsen worked this past summer, said Carlsen came to him highly recommended by a mutual friend and he had been looking forward to working with Carlsen again this coming year. Brown called Carlsen an "incredible professional as far as a sportsfishing captain." He said the staff had been hoping for a miracle and Carlsen would be found alright. "He was just a fantastic guy," Brown said.”


December 6, 3010 [VCS]: “Body of missing diver is found. Man had died near Santa Cruz Island. The Santa Barbara Sheriff's Coroner's Bureau will conduct an investigation into the cause of death for Kristopher Evens Carlsen, 27, who died this weekend while diving for lobster off Santa Cruz Island. Friend Cheryl Brown said Carlsen had just proposed to his girlfriend last week. "He had such a great smile that everyone will remember when they think of him," Brown said, adding that he was a "Brad Pitt kind of kid with big dimples and bright eyes." Known as "K.C." to friends, Carlsen was lobster diving with his father and friend off the vessel Golden Child just north of Fraser Point on Saturday. Carlsen, a 13-year scuba diving veteran from Santa Barbara, submerged at around 9 p.m. He was reported missing around 10:30 a.m., failing to resurface from a 20-foot dive according to the Coast Guard. He had last been seen wearing a black wet suit, scuba gear and a silver oxygen mask. The search began Saturday and continued Sunday with a Coast Guard helicopter out of Los Angeles; the cutter Blackfin out of Santa Barbara; a 47-foot rescue boat from the Coast Guard station at Channel Islands Harbor; two small boats from the National Park Service; and divers from the Ventura County and Santa Barbara sheriff's departments. The Santa Barbara Sheriff's dive team conducted search patterns along the coastline while the Ventura County Sheriff's dive team combed caves. The rest of the rescuers searched the surface. At 12:08 p.m. Sunday, the Ventura County Sheriff's dive team found Carlsen's body in a crevasse leading into a cave not far from where he was last seen submerging. The Coast Guard Cutter Blackfin took Carlsen's body to Santa Barbara. Carlsen was an experienced captain and lobster diver. On different websites targeting sportsfishermen, Carlsen posted photos and stories about diving for lobsters, or "bugs," at locations such as San Miguel and Santa Cruz. Carlsen loved the water, spending the past summer captaining on offshore charter boat in Alaska, according to friend and fellow Alaska charter captain Andy Martin. "He was just a great person."”


December 7, 2010 [Noozhawk]: “Teddy Ritter never liked basketball — not until Kristopher Evens “K.C.” Carlsen showed him some moves. “My son has a hard time getting to know people, but K.C. brought him into situations like pickup basketball games, which my son was too shy to go on his own,” said Susan Ritter, Teddy’s mom. Carlsen, known as “K.C.” to friends, took Teddy under his wing. He taught him how to fish, play basketball and kayak. Teddy would wait for Carlsen, a commercial fisherman and 13-year veteran scuba diver, to return from his fishing trips and would help him unload and clean the fish, Ritter said. But when Carlsen didn’t return Saturday, Teddy knew something was wrong. Carlsen, a 27-year-old Santa Barbara resident, was lobster diving with his father, Dave, and a friend just north of Fraser Point off Santa Cruz Island when he submerged about 9 a.m. Saturday and never resurfaced, according to Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Drew Sugars. The Coroner’s Bureau is conducting an investigation to determine the cause of death. “I don’t know how my son will deal with this from this point on,” Ritter told Noozhawk on Monday. “He hasn’t gotten to the point of crying because it hasn’t really hit him, but his comments are, ‘What am I going to do without him?’ It’s a huge loss.” The Ritters aren’t alone in their grieving. Aside from fishing and diving, Carlsen made it a priority to help at the Page Youth Center, 4540 Hollister Ave., as a youth basketball coach. “We felt like he was our kid who grew up here and went on to succeed,” said Wana Dowell, the Page Youth Center’s development director. “If anyone set an example for other kids, it was K.C. He was the kindest person, (he was) so sweet, everything nice you would want in a young man.” Dowell said her fondest memory is a recent one, when Carlsen spoke to Page Youth Center donors about how important the facility was for him while he was growing up, especially during some of his most difficult years. “He came dressed up in suit and spoke so eloquently about what it was like to grow up when his mother died (when he was 16),” Dowell said. “The loss that he went through was incredible. We could see his pain, but he kept a stiff upper lip. “He was just an amazing young man. ... If anything summed him up, he was full of joy despite the hardships he went through.” PYC executive director Bob Yost said Carlsen showed so much love for the children he coached despite not being a parent, which is rare. He said that from an early age Carlsen genuinely cared about other people. “K.C. was just a good guy, interested in doing the right things the right way, and he wanted to make sure the kids understood that as well and maintained a good attitude toward life,” Yost said. “He affected a lot of kids over the years, so many families in this town were touched by K.C. — the next generation is going to miss out on that.” Aside from volunteering, fishing was Carlsen’s passion. It was an industry in which he excelled, said Alaska charter Capt. Andy Martin, with whom Carlsen spent last summer captaining for Deep Blue Charters. “It was incredible how enthusiastic he was about fishing every day,” Martin said. “Many people come to Alaska to experience a dream of a fishing trip, and K.C. worked hard to give them the trip of their life.” He added that he was the first man at the dock and the last man out. On his days off, while most of the crew was tired and content to relax after numerous trips at sea, Carlsen would get up at the crack of dawn, hike three miles to a small salmon stream and fish, Martin said. Deep Blue Charters owner Steve Brown said Carlsen had the utmost care and respect for the guests. In fact, Brown had to break the tragic news to four groups of people who wanted to schedule times with Carlsen in Alaska next summer. It was the most rebookings the charter ever had with a first-year captain. “He was a tremendous fisherman; not average in any way in fishing skills, just right at the top as far as being the type of fisherman who would bring guests back,” Brown said. “It’s always a tragedy to see a young man as talented and as thoughtful as he was ... he will be sorely missed by his friends.” Whenever his friend and fellow fisherman, Steve Bior, saw Carlsen’s boat, the Golden Child, he felt more comfortable at sea. “He was down to earth, always smiling, treated everybody the same,” said Bior, adding that he always looked forward to talking to Carlsen over the radio. “He was humble, trustworthy and an all-around honest man.” Bior said Carlsen knew Santa Cruz Island like the “back of his hand.” He said Carlsen had had a good outing about a month ago and decided to go to the spot by Fraser Point. He was on a boat with his father and a mutual friend nearby when Carlsen went missing. “He was someone I admired, always putting himself second; he was just a good friend and a good fisherman,” said Tony Vultaggio, friend and owner of Santa Barbara Sport Fishing Charters. “I’m still in shock about the whole thing. ... I know a lot of people respected him — even if you were around him for short period of time, you knew what kind of person he was. “It’s heart-wrenching, it’s tragic. He’ll be a part of my life forever.” Many of Carlsen’s friends said such a tragedy serves as a reminder that the sea can be unforgiving and deadly. But there are precautions that can be taken. The most important safety tip is to dive with a buddy and properly maintained equipment, said Capt. David Bacon, owner of WaveWalker Charters and Noozhawk’s outdoors columnist. He said spots around Fraser Point are some of the most dangerous because of powerful currents, which also provide rich sea life. “There was a new moon Saturday, as well; it’s one of the few times a month when the tidal influence is the greatest,” Bacon said. “It tends to add force to the currents.” But Carlsen’s friends agreed he wouldn’t have taken a chance if the risk was too great, adding that he had an understanding of fishing and about life in general that transcended his age. “The thing that struck me the most about K.C. was that he had an understanding how life works beyond his years,” Brown said. One of Carlsen’s passions was showing people what he could see through his eyes, Ritter said, including his fiancée, Meagan O’Connor, whom he had asked to marry him two weeks ago. Ritter said she had never seen Carlsen so happy. “Few people have that glow about them, outgoing personality and sense of caring,” Dowell said. “People aren’t always that open, you don’t get that often, with feelings of the heart.” In addition to O’Connor, Carlsen is survived by a younger brother, Nate, an older sister, Emily, and his father, Dave, who raised the children after his wife died about 11 years ago. “It’s like a family member passed,” Ritter said. “I just see my son’s life being different without him.” Just as Carlsen showed him some moves on the court, Teddy is now helping autistic children through an elective at San Marcos High School, Carlsen’s alma mater. “I truly think that part of reason for that was because somebody cared for him as much as K.C. did,” Ritter said. “He is kind of giving back now.”