Difference between revisions of "CATALINA POTTERY"

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'''Avalon Art Ware''' was introduced in 1937 and discontinued in 1942. Colors available were Matt Ivory (M.P. 5) and a two-toned combination of Matt Ivory exterior lined with a Turquoise Satin interior. The C-prefix to the shape number indicates the item was from a Catalina Island mold. All 19 items in this collection were from an island mold.'''
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'''Avalon Art Ware''' was introduced in 1937 and discontinued in 1942. Colors available were Matt Ivory (M.P. 5) and a two-toned combination of Matt Ivory exterior lined with a Turquoise Satin interior. The C-prefix to the shape number indicates the item was from a Catalina Island mold. All 19 items in the Avalon Art Ware collection were from the Catalina Island molds. Avalon Art Ware was sold in the two-color combination with the exterior of the piece in Ivory matt and the interior in Turquoise satin. Candlesticks & candle-holders were sold in solid matt Ivory.  Note that all of these shapes/numbers were also in the Catalina Art Ware line, with the exceptions of C-709 and C-313. 
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Although the shapes were also in the Catalina Art Ware line, they were in OTHER glazes and glaze combinations other than the exterior in Ivory with the interior in Turquoise satin.  Solid Ivory pieces would be considered to be in the Catalina Art Ware line, with the exception of candlesticks and candle-holders which were also sold in the Avalon Art Ware line.
  
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===== Catalina Gladding McBean: Avalon Art Ware (1937-1942) =====
 
===== Catalina Gladding McBean: Avalon Art Ware (1937-1942) =====
 
 
 
  
 
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Revision as of 12:27, 2 August 2020

Catalina Clay Pottery Factory, Santa Catalina Island
Walter Speck (1896-1979)


CATALINA POTTERY

The Early Years: 1927-1932
In 1927, the Catalina Island Pottery and Tile Factory was established by William Wrigley, Jr. as a practical endeavor to build the Island’s resort town of Avalon with bricks and roofing tiles made from local clay deposits, while also providing year-round work for its residents. In the early years, the factory developed molds and produced pottery pieces, which were made using the island’s native red clay. From late 1929, to about November of 1933, they produced pottery pieces #1 to #165, which were made primarily using the island’s native red clay. To add strength to the products, in 1932 white clay from the mainland was imported and combined with the island's red clay. Soon thereafter only white clay was used.

According to Carole Coates: "White clay was imported in later years but other than for molded pieces and dinnerware which required a fine slip, Island clay varied in color from deep brick red, to medium, brownish, and even buff light clay. Some of this was even mixed with mainland clay. The demise of the pottery came about much more because of the Depression than about the “cost” of importing white clay."

Glazes were made with local minerals mined on the Island. Some early colors were given island-related names such as Catalina Blue, Toyon Red and Descanso Green, in addition to Black, White, Mandarin Yellow (Manchu) and Monterey Brown.

One of the most rare of all the Catalina Pottery dinnerware pieces is the Tortilla Warmer with its raised design lid (10 inches wide x 3 inches tall). Only a handful are known to exist—one of which is in the Stern Collection.


The Middle Years: 1932-1937
In 1933, Detroit artist, Walter Speck (1896-1979), visited the island. Best known for his WPA mural, "Ford Riot", Speck was inspired to draw the Catalina Clay Products factory outside of Avalon. His signed watercolor is also in the Stern Collection.


The last price list was issued November 1, 1936. Colors were referred to by number:<br Catalina Blue (No. 1); Descanso Green (No. 2); Toyon Red (No. 3); Mandarin Yellow (No. 4); Monterey Brown (No. 5); Pearly White (No. 6); Turquoise (No. 7); Wine/Burgundy (No. 8); Flesh/Beige (No. 9); Powder Blue (No. 10); Colonial Yellow (No. 11); and Coral Island (No. 12). Toyon red glaze was always priced at an additional 10%.


The Catalina Gladding McBean Years: 1937-1942
In 1937, Catalina Clay Products, including all equipment, stock, molds, and trademarks, was sold by the Catalina Island Company to Gladding, McBean & Co., and operations were moved to Glendale. All their pieces used white clay. The branched out into specialty line production:


Catalina-marked pieces were produced for about five years. A decade after Gladding, McBean & Co. acquired the molds and rights to the Catalina name, they ceased Catalinaware production and returned the use of the trademark to the Santa Catalina Island Company.




CATALINA POTTERY BIBLIOGRAPHY IN SCIF ARCHIVES



Santa Catalina Island Pottery: Island Red Clay (1927-1933)

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Santa Catalina Island Pottery: White Clay Imported (1932-1937)

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Santa Catalina Island Pottery: Saguaro Art Ware (1940-1942)

Saguaro Art Ware was produced by Gladding McBean as part of their Catalina Art Ware line from 1940 to 1942. These shapes emulate those found on the Saguaro cacti. The 18 pieces in the photograph are the two-toned glaze combination of Turquoise Satin with Coral Satin, except for one piece in Golden Glow with Glacial Blue (shape C-261). This is thought to be the entire collection of shapes. With the exception of Solid Ivory matt glazed pieces, Saguaro Art Ware came in the following color combinations:

* Turquoise Satin exterior with Coral Satin interior
* Green satin exterior with Yellow Satin interior
* Chartreuse exterior with Maroon interior
* Golden Glow satin exterior with Glacial Blue interior



Catalina Gladding McBean: Saguaro Art Ware (1940-1942)

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Avalon Art Ware was introduced in 1937 and discontinued in 1942. Colors available were Matt Ivory (M.P. 5) and a two-toned combination of Matt Ivory exterior lined with a Turquoise Satin interior. The C-prefix to the shape number indicates the item was from a Catalina Island mold. All 19 items in the Avalon Art Ware collection were from the Catalina Island molds. Avalon Art Ware was sold in the two-color combination with the exterior of the piece in Ivory matt and the interior in Turquoise satin. Candlesticks & candle-holders were sold in solid matt Ivory. Note that all of these shapes/numbers were also in the Catalina Art Ware line, with the exceptions of C-709 and C-313.

Although the shapes were also in the Catalina Art Ware line, they were in OTHER glazes and glaze combinations other than the exterior in Ivory with the interior in Turquoise satin. Solid Ivory pieces would be considered to be in the Catalina Art Ware line, with the exception of candlesticks and candle-holders which were also sold in the Avalon Art Ware line.



Catalina Gladding McBean: Avalon Art Ware (1937-1942)

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Floral Art Ware is a collection of 23 shapes based on floral motifs. Floral Art Ware was discontinued in 1942. In addition to a solid Ivory matt, Floral Art Ware was issued in the following color combinations:

  • Silver Gray exterior with Green matt interior
  • Glacial Blue exterior with Pink Buff satin interior
  • Dark Green exterior with Amethyst interior
  • Oatmeal exterior with Shell Pink gloss interior









Catalina Gladding McBean: Floral Art Ware (1940-1942)

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Nautical Art Ware line was introduced in 1939. Many of the shapes had previously been in other art ware lines. There are 26 shapes in the collection.

Catalina Gladding McBean: Catalina Nautical Art Ware (1939-1942)

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