Chinese on Anacapa Island

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CHINESE ON ANACAPA ISLAND


In the News~

June 14, 1883 [SBDP]: “Larco arrived with his sloop yesterday from Anacapa Island with a cargo of fifty sheep and about 1200 pounds of rock cod. The latter is shipped here by Chinamen to be salted, dried and sent to China. Captain Larco took on a load of lumber and started for San Miguel Island.”


August 1, 1883 [SBDP]: “Further adventures of the Santa Barbara exploring party... Then the party disembarked [on Anacapa Island] and made camp in a wild looking ravine where some Chinese abalone fishers had some time made their home. They had left an abundance of fuel behind...”


May 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Angel Dolly sailed for Anacapa this noon with a load of Chinamen to gather abalones. She has been refitted, the cabin enlarged and a galley built on deck. She will be a comfortable excursion craft, swift and well managed.”


February 27, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came into port this morning from Anacapa Island, bringing a cargo of abalones and shells for Chinese shippers.”


August 14, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came in yesterday from Anacapa Island with a load of Chinese abalone hunters.”


August 23, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Anacapa Island yesterday to bring back a party of Chinamen who have been there gathering abalones.”


August 26, 1895 [LAT/VC]: “Abalone meat. Sing Hing, the oldest and most influential Chinese merchant in this county, having resided and done business here for nearly thirty years, is reaping a rich harvest of abalone meat and shells on Anacapa Island this season. He has contracted with Frank Fazzio to bring over from the island between ten and twelve tons of shells and meat. The meat will be shipped to China, and the shells sold in San Francisco…”


April 17, 1900 [SDET]: “...Coolies in the channel. In December last while investigating wine interests in upper Santa Barbara county, he was furnished information relative to two Chinese laborers who were at work on a ranch in Ventura county, and who were without certificates. The information as it reached him was given to Chinese Inspector Putnam of Los Angeles. In Santa Barbara county he gathered the information on rumor that Chinese are being landed on Anacapa Island, and then transferred to the mainland under guise of abalone fishermen. Recently three Chinese were found on Anacapa in a starved condition, one subsequently dying from the effects of exposure and starvation. Rumor had it at the time that they were part of a gang who were run in and left on the island, and awaiting transportation to the mainland.”


June 4, 1900 [LAT/VC]: “Chin Lin Yung pleaded guilty to the charge of taking abalones out of season on Anacapa Island, and was fined $20.”


June 9, 1900 [SBMP]: “Ventura officials after Chinamen for violating law. The three Chinamen who were arrested at Anacapa Island last week by the Constable Arrellanes and brought to the mainland charged with taking abalones out of season, having been settled with by the authorities. One of the pleaded guilty before Judge Argabrite and was fined $20. He paid the fine. The other two were discharged from custody. There was a pretty stiff fight made in the case by the Santa Barbara Chinese firm for which these fishermen were working, and an attempt made to break down the ordinance, or the right of the supervisors to make such a law, but the Superior Court upheld the county body, and the Chinese did not think it worthwhile to further obstruct matters. The outcome of this case will have a good effect in saving abalones, crawfish and clams.”


June 14, 1900 [SBWP]: “Abalone Fishing. Ventura Signal: The three Chinese who were arrested at Anacapa Island last week by Constable Arrellanes and brought to the mainland charged with taking abalones out of season, have been settled with the authorities. One of them pleaded guilty before Judge Argabrite and was fined $20. He paid the fine. The other two were discharged from custody. There was a pretty stiff fight made in the case by the Santa Barbara Chinese firm for which these fishermen were working, and an attempt made to break down the ordinance, or the right of the supervisors to make such a law, but the Superior Court upheld the county body, and the Chinese did not think it worth while to further obstruct matters. The outcome of this case will have a good effect in saving abalones, crawfish and clams.”


July 21, 1900 [OC]: “An outing on Anacapa… The only human inhabitant is one man who tends the sheep, and three Chinamen, who during the season collect abalone shells. For these they receive $70 per ton in Germany, while the meat is dried and sold in China…”