Clemente

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Clemente (#) (-), fishing schooner owned by Alvin Hyder, among others, after the turn of the century.



In the News~

July 13, 1897 [LAH]: “Captain Remington, with the schooner Clemente, took a party out this morning for a sail to Redondo, where they will remain for dinner and return this evening. Those aboard of her were George H. Bixby and wife, Harry Bixby, Miss Fannie Bixby, George Flint, Miss Maud Healy, Miss Juliette Graham, and with several friends from San Francisco.”


November 28, 1899 [LAH]: ”San Pedro, Nov. 27.—The fishing schooner Clemente brought over from Clemente Island Sunday a load of lobsters for one of the local fish companies.”


January 30, 1900 [LAH]: “The gasoline schooner Clemente arrived here Thursday from Clemente Island with 1500 pounds of lobsters and 1000 pounds of fresh fish.”


June 30, 1900 [LAH]: “San Pedro, June 29.—The motor schooner Clemente caught fire on Tuesday while lying in the stream in the inner harbor off Terminal Island and had a narrow escape from total destruction. She was finally beached, the fire was out out and her engines and machinery saved. After the fire had gained good headway, three men who were aboard of her left fearing the explosion of some 40 gallons of gasoline which was in the supply tank. M. Mershon, an engineer in the sawmill at Terminal Island, rowed up in his skiff at the risk of being blown up, went aboard the burning vessel and for three hours worked incessantly with a pall throwing water around the gasoline tank and machinery. The fire finally, with the help of others was put out after the boat was run aground in shallow water. Mershon's skiff, which had swung with the tide to the stern of the burning Clemente, was burned down to the water's edge. The damage to the boat is considerable.”


September 7, 1901 [LAH]: “The power schooner Clemente arrived in port today from the Santa Barbara islands, with 3000 pounds of lobsters.”


September 10, 1901 [LAH]: “The schooner Clemente brought 2000 pounds of lobsters from Clemente Island yesterday for J. J. Conner, and the Amy came in from Santa Cruz Island with 6000 pounds for Morgan Oyster Company.”


January 10, 1902 [LAH]: “It is conceded here now that the schooner Bell, Captain Harry Olsen, is lost. She left here on December 26 last to go to Santa Cruz Island, and the last time she was seen was off Portuguese Bend. The schooner Clemente returned yesterday from the island, and brought a hatch and some crates that belonged to the Bell. It is thought the Bell was wrecked between Redondo and Santa Monica. Captain Olsen had followed the sea all his life, and was a sober, reliable man. The vessel was valued at $3500 and had just been fitted out with a fine new engine.”


January 19, 1902 [LAH]: “Captain Hyder will leave here tomorrow in his schooner, the Clemente, for Santa Barbara, to bring back the little schooner Belle, which belongs to Captain Harry Olsen. The vessel is not very badly damaged, and will be put into shape for a small amount of money.”


September 28, 1902 [LAH]: “The schooner Clemente of the Morgan Oyster Company arrived during the week from Clemente Island with 7000 pounds of lobsters for the company.”


November 25, 1902 [LAT/SP]: “The schooner Clemente, Captain Romans, came in last night from the Santa Barbara islands with a ton of lobsters for the Morgan Oyster Company.”


January 4, 1903 [LAH]: “The schooner Clemente arrived here Thursday from Anacapa Island with 1000 pounds of lobsters and 1500 pounds of fish, consigned to the Morgan Oyster Company.”


January 11, 1903 [LAH]: “The gasoline schooner Clemente arrived Wednesday from Anacapa Island with 3000 pounds of rock and 1000 pounds of lobsters for the Morgan Oyster Company.”


January 4, 1903 [LAH]: “The schooner Clemente arrived here Thursday from Anacapa Island with 1000 pounds of lobsters and 1500 pounds of fish, consigned to the Morgan Oyster Company.”


March 9, 1903 [LAH]: “Movement of local vessels. Sunday, March 8. Arrived. The power boat Clemente, Captain Roman, from Santa Barbara Island with 1300 pounds of rock cod for the Morgan Oyster Company.”


March 10, 1903 [LAH]: “Departed. The schooner Clemente for Anacapa Island.“


March 17, 1903 [LAH]: “Departed. Schooner Clemente, Captain Roman, for Anacapa Island.“


March 20, 1903 [LAH]: “Arrived. Schooner Clemente, Captain Roman, from Anacapa Island, with fish for Morgan and Western Fish companies.“


April 10, 1903 [LAH]: “Arrived. Fishing sloop Clemente, Captain Roman, from Anacapa Island.“


April 26, 1903 [LAH]: “Arrived. Schooner Clemente, [Captain] Gallup, from Anacapa Island.“


April 27, 1903 [LAH]: “Arrived. Schooner Clemente, [Captain] Strange, from Portuguese Bend.“


April 28, 1903 [LAH]: “Arrived. Schooner Clementeon dry dock at Terminal Island for repairs.“


May 4, 1904 [LAH]: “...Schooner Clemente went out to look for the Minerva and her crew. This morning at a point about forty miles south of Catalina Island the Minerva was sighted. Captain Pugh found the men in good spirits, but utterly worn out by their long fight with the storm. The Clemente threw them a line, transferred the crew from the open boat to the warm cabin of the schooner and returned to port where the crew was joyously welcomed. With Captain Fellows on this rough voyage were Oscar Freitag, David Barry, George Kramer, Homer Evans, Ed Roff and George Graham. Mrs. Fellows never abandoned hope of her husband's safety throughout all the weary hours when it was known that Captain Fellows was battling for his life in an angry sea. Throughout the long watches of the night she sat at her baby's crib crooning it to cradle songs and praying for the father, but she never admitted the possibility of his shipwreck...“


February 6, 1907 [SFC]: “San Pedro, February 5.—Divers are at work trying to raise the large launch J. C. Elliott, which was sunk by the steam schooner Charmel when she left this port a few days ago. The small schooner Clemente, which was sunk at the same time, was damaged beyond repair. Captain Mason of the Clemente has put in a bill for $1500 damages.“