Difference between revisions of "Ella G"

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<span style="color:#0066cc">''' ''Ella G''</span> (#116928) (1899-1908)''', 49-foot American-built sailing schooner of British registry wrecked at Bechers Bay, half a mile west of the wharf on Santa Rosa Island, on February 2, 1908. She had come to the California coast from Vancouver, B.C. intent on sealing, and at the time of her wrecking, she had the captain, four sailors, two seal hunters and a Japanese cook aboard. As she worked her way down the coast in poor weather, she had taken 42 seals off the Farallones. Her rudder was lost off Monterey, and after fighting heavy seas, she reached Bechers Bay January 31, 1908. Although two anchors were set, during the night one cable and then the other parted in heavy seas. Two skiffs were launched to save the crew, all of whom made it ashore in the light of day.  
 
<span style="color:#0066cc">''' ''Ella G''</span> (#116928) (1899-1908)''', 49-foot American-built sailing schooner of British registry wrecked at Bechers Bay, half a mile west of the wharf on Santa Rosa Island, on February 2, 1908. She had come to the California coast from Vancouver, B.C. intent on sealing, and at the time of her wrecking, she had the captain, four sailors, two seal hunters and a Japanese cook aboard. As she worked her way down the coast in poor weather, she had taken 42 seals off the Farallones. Her rudder was lost off Monterey, and after fighting heavy seas, she reached Bechers Bay January 31, 1908. Although two anchors were set, during the night one cable and then the other parted in heavy seas. Two skiffs were launched to save the crew, all of whom made it ashore in the light of day.  
  
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Latest revision as of 02:39, 29 June 2015

Ella G (#116928) (1899-1908), 49-foot American-built sailing schooner of British registry wrecked at Bechers Bay, half a mile west of the wharf on Santa Rosa Island, on February 2, 1908. She had come to the California coast from Vancouver, B.C. intent on sealing, and at the time of her wrecking, she had the captain, four sailors, two seal hunters and a Japanese cook aboard. As she worked her way down the coast in poor weather, she had taken 42 seals off the Farallones. Her rudder was lost off Monterey, and after fighting heavy seas, she reached Bechers Bay January 31, 1908. Although two anchors were set, during the night one cable and then the other parted in heavy seas. Two skiffs were launched to save the crew, all of whom made it ashore in the light of day.



In the News~

February 4, 1908 [LAT]: GET ARTICLE


February 13, 1908 [SBMP]:Ella G wrecked on Santa Rosa Island. Seventeen-ton sealing craft driven 250 miles through turbulent seas without a rudder, finally dashed to pieces on the rocks off Becher's Bay, Santa Rosa Island... [The crew] rowed up the creek to a ranch house, where they received shelter for three days... Three days after the sea cast them upon Santa Rosa Island, they left it for Santa Cruz Island in their own boats. They reached there safely and remained on the beach in one of the many fishing camps until the schooner Baltic appeared picking up the catches of the fishermen. The commander of the Baltic gladly volunteered to bring the men back to the mainland...”


February 13, 1908 [LAT/SB]: “Sealing schooner wrecked. Captain Joseph Lamp and his crew of eight men of the seventeen-ton sailing schooner Ella G of Victoria, B. C., were landed here today by the power schooner Baltic, and tell of the wreck of their vessel at Beecher’s Bay, Santa Rosa Island, February 2. The vessel was a sealer, chartered by the captain, and left Victoria November 14. She ran into a succession of southeast gales in a month’s sail to the Farallone Islands, where they took forty-two seals. On January 25, just south of Monterey, their rudder snapped off and, rudderless, they sailed for Santa Rosa, reaching there January 31, experiencing storms all the way. Double cables were dropped, but before daylight on February 2 these snapped in the gale and the ship was beaten ashore and battered to pieces against the bluff. The men escaped in two boats and managed to reach shore safely, going to Santa Cruz Island and from thence were brought here. They have notified the British Consul in Los Angeles of their predicament.”


February 22, 1908 [LAH]: “Schooner lost, but crew saved. Santa Barbara.—Captain Joseph Lamp and the crew of the Ella G, a 17-ton sealing schooner, owned by Voss of Victoria, B.C., arrived in this city last week from Santa Rosa Island, where their vessel was wrecked in a series of storms on February 2. The men have been cared for on the island until they could reach the mainland.”