Eustace

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Eustace (#) (1864-1881), schooner owned by Barron, Forbes and Company and launched in Newburyport, Massachussets under the command of Captain Matthew William Furlong. Furlong used the ship to carry cargo between Santa Cruz Island and the mainland. He was the ship’s master until 1869 when the ship was sold. The August 28, 1864 - January 12 1865 Eustace logbook is in the California Historical Society library. The Eustace was destroyed in 1881 in a bizarre incident: Captain David Hornsby, formerly of the Idaho and other steamships running north, met with a tragic death in 1881 aboard Eustace. He left San Francisco in command of the schooner Eustace, carrying explosives, and soon after passing out of the Golden Gate was killed by the crazy Chinese cook. The murderer was at once locked up, but he managed to set fire to the schooner, and the crew hastily took to the boats to get as far away as possible before the inevitable explosion should take place. The vessel was blown to atoms a few moments afterward. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest [Written in 1895], p. 291.


In the News~

December 5, 1864 [BDA]: “Left. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, from Baltimore for San Francisco, to sail in a few days.”


January 13, 1865 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Arrived. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, 135 days from Baltimore via Rio de Janeiro, 78 days; coal to Barron & Co.”


January 30, 1865 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Foreign Ports. Rio Janeiro. Sailed. October 25. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, from Baltimore for this port.”


February 21, 1865 [SFDEB]: “New craft in the Santa Barbara channel. The Eustace, one of the finest schooner craft in California, built especially for the Channel trade, arrived at Santa Barbara on the 20th of January, in charge of Captain Furlong, under whose inspection she was constructed last year at Portsmouth, N. H., for the proprietors of the island of Santa Cruz, regardless of cost. She made the run from Rio Janeiro to San Francisco in 76 days, and from Point Conception to Santa Barbara in a little over three hours, and is warranted to sink the hull of the old Senator into the horizon in any breeze in which sails can draw. The people at the port took her for a revenue cutter as she sailed in, and they hope from her good looks to see their heavy freight bills cut down for the remainder of 1865.”


July 11, 1865 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Arrived. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, 5 days from Santa Cruz Island; wool, etc. to Barron & Co.”


July 26, 1865 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Sailed. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, San Pedro.”


November 13, 1866 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Cleared. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, San Blas, Barron & Company.”


March 9, 1867 [SM]: “… There are hopes of getting some money of a seizure they made the other day on board the American schooner Eustace, belonging to Messrs. Barron, Forbes and Co., of Tepic, of about 18,000 dollars, 14,000 dollars of which were silver bars (not allowed to be exported by the American revenue laws), and 4090 dollard in hard cash. The latter are seized, as an additional fine, and the schooner herself will probably be likewose confiscated, if they can accomplish it. The whole was duly cleared at the San Blas Custom House as coined silver, but somebody on board, it appears, informed against it. The commander of the Mohongo is doing everything in his power to save the schooner…”


July 1, 1867 [SFDEB]: “Marine Intelligence. Arrived. Schooner Eustace, [Captain] Furlong, 15 days from Santa Cruz Island, via San Simeon 5 days; wool to Barron & Company.”


March 13, 1869 [SFDEB]: “Auction. Thursday, March 18, 1869 at 12 o’clock, at salesroom, No. 327 Montgomery Street. Fine clipper schooner Eustace. Is in thorough A No. 1 condition, 146 tons register, and fitted for sea immediately; was built in Newburyport in 1864, and has been recently newly coppered, and supplied with a complete new set of sails. Can be seen at Clay Street wharf. Terms cash. Maurice Dore & Co., Auctioneers.”


June 12, 1881 [SFDEB]: “Total destruction of the schooner Eustace. Further news concerning the tragic voyage of the Eustace to Mazatlan is furnished in the following dispatch: Mazatlan, June 19, 1881 — The schooner Eustace was completely destroyed by the explosion. Mate and sailor are here to return to San Francisco as soon as protest is finished. The Chinese cook, Tom Hoy, who, the dispatch of yesterday reported had murdered Captain Hornsby and fired the vessel, was blown up with the vessel, the fire of which he had created having communicated with the 2,200 kegs of powder on board.”


June 21, 1881 [MDS]: “A private dispatch from Mazatlan of the 17th reports the arrival of the mate and four men of the schooner Eustace, who say the cook killed Captain Hornsby, was imprisoned in a cabin and set the vessel on fire. The Eustace left San Francisco May 1 for Mazatlan with a cargo valued at $70,000, including a lot of giant powder. The captain, mate, four sailors and Chinese cook were on board.”


June 21, 1881 [SFDEB]: “Total destruction of the schooner Eustace. Further news concerning the tragic voyage of the Eustace to Mazatlan is furnished in the following dispatch: Mazatlan, June 19, 1881. The schooner Eustace was completely destroyed by the explosion. Mate and sailors are here to return to San Frncisco as soon as protest is finished. The Chinese cook, Tom Hoy, who, the dispatch of yesterday reported had murdered Captain Hornsby and fired the vessel, was blown up with the vessel, the fire of which he had created having communicated with to 2,200 kegs of powder on board.”


June 22, 1881 [SFDEB]: “The schooner Eustace, which was consumed by an explosion caused by the ignition of 2,200 kegs of powder, forming a part of the cargo, through the agency of a fire started by the murderous Chinese cook while a prisoner in the cabin for killing the master, Captain Hornsby, was owned by I. Gutte. She was valued at $10,000, and was insured for over $71,000, most of which was in local marine insurance companies. Captain Hornsby, the unfortunate master of the Eustace, was formerly an officer in the United States Navy, and was held in high esteem by those who were acquainted with him.”