Flyer

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C. B. Linton's Flyer

Flyer (#) (-), sixty-foot power cruiser acquired by Clarence B. Linton in 1911. He used Flyer both around the California Channel Islands as well as on a trip to Lower California and to the South Pacific as well. Linton was most active on and around the Channel Islands from 1907-1912. He is reported once to have waited offshore from San Nicolas Island for six days before being able to land ashore safely. By 1914 the Flyer was owned and operated by fisherman, Charles Hanson.



In the News~

“July 7, 1909 on board the good ship Flyer, somewhere between Santa Barbara and San Nicolas islands, with the following members [Cooper Ornithological Club] present: O. W. Howard, W. B. Judson, A. P. Howard, H. J. Lelande, C. B. Linton, Otto J. Zahn, Antonin Jay, Chester Lamb and Howard Robertson; also the following as visitors: C. A. Caldwell, It. A. Gaylord, H. F. Hossick, Emerson Knight, H. Linton, H. N. Lowe, W. S. McQuilling, Captain Graves, Mate Grannis, and cook Vic… The party left Long Beach on Friday evening, July 2, for a three days’ trip to Santa Barbara and San Nicolas islands. Santa Barbara Island was first visited… Leaving Santa Barbara Island about 3 P.M. the trip was made to San Nicolas Island, reaching the sand spit at the southeast end of the island about 8 P.M. Sunday. July 4 was spent on the island by most of the party, some of whom walked around the island and examined the cormorant rookeries and the Indian burial grounds…” [Condor 12:1 (52)]


July 8, 1909 [LAH]: “Long Beach, July 7. The party of sixteen members of the Cooper Club of California who went to Santa Barbara Island July 3 in Captain W. H. Graves’ launch Flyer, returned last night with a large assortment of relics and interesting discoveries and with a story of having weathered one of the sharpest storms known among the Channel Islands for some years. Several different times members of the party were thrown overboard while trying to make landings through the heavy surf, and once several of the men had to stay all of one night and the following day in a small cave, being unable to return to their boat. In the party were Harry Lelande, city clerk of Los Angeles; attorney Howard Robertson, O. W. and Arthur Howard, Dr. Otto J. Zahn, W. B. Judson, H. F. Hossack, Antonio Jay, Emerson Knight, Dr. Horace Gaylord, H. N. Lowe, W. S. McQuilling, Chester Lamb, C. S. Caldwell, Clarence B. Linton, Horace Linton, Captain W. H. Graves, Mate Granis Crandall and Chef Victor Sepulveda.”


June 13, 1910 [LAH]: “Long Beach, June 12. The members of the Cooper Ornithological Club of Los Angeles, who sailed away a week ago aboard the Flyer, returned to San Pedro at 3 o’clock this morning and came to Long Beach three hours later. The members of the excursion reported having a pleasant trip, devoid of accidents and brought home a large number of specimens of birds and shells. They visited all the nearby islands. Another party of members of the club, who started from San Pedro, is still at San Miguel Island.”


November 17, 1910 [LAH]: “Long Beach, November 16. Wild boars found on Santa Rosa Island. Returning from an eight days’ cruise on the local launch Flyer, owner by attorney A. C. Lawson, eight persons arrived here early this morning with reports of exciting adventure and considerable success in hunting wild boars on Santa Rosa Island. Ten or fifteen wild hogs were killed. Several of them had tusks which measured three inches in length. One woman, Mrs. Dede Dean, accompanied this party, and she shot one of the biggest boars, estimated to weigh 240 pounds. Some of the wild hogs fought viciously, and the hunstmen escaped injury only by their agility. Mrs. Dean fired five shots from a 30-30 rifle into the big hog she killed. She brought the head home with her. A few weeks ago Mrs. Dean caught an eight-foot shark from the Flyer’s deck. Others of the party were Captain Roy Ballou, Hethel Lawson, William Kuehler, Dr. Bernard M. Storch, W. E. Jackson and James Moores. Dr. Storch brought home a tusk a little more than three and a half inches long. He described the wild hogs as having manes which stood out five or six inches from their backs. At Santa Cruz another variety of wild hog was found, these being apparently only domestic hogs which had grown wild. The Flyer visited Anacapa Island also, and put in at Santa Barbara because of the high wind and heavy sea last Sunday. While off one of the islands the high sea caused the loss of the Flyer’s skiff, and for a day and a half those in the party were unable to get ashore for fuel or water. They finally found another harbor where they could land at a pier.”


November 17, 1910 [SBMP]: “A party of Long Beach campers has been storm bound at Santa Cruz Island, according to reports brought over by fishermen. They left the southern port over a week ago in the launch Flyer, expecting to make but a short trip…”


November 19, 1910 [SBMP]: “Returning to Long Beach from an eight days’ cruise on the local launch Flyer owned by attorney H. C. Lawson, eight persons had stories to tell of exciting adventure and considerable success in hunting wild boars on Santa Rosa Island. Ten or fifteen wild hogs were killed. Several of them had tusks which measured 3 inches in length. One woman, Belle Dean, accompanied the party and she shot one of the biggest boars, estimated to weigh 240 pounds. Some of the wild hogs fought viciously and the hunters escaped injury only by their agility. Mrs. Dean fired five shots from a 30-30 rifle into the big hog she killed. She took the head home with her. Others of the party were Captain Roy Ballou, Bethal Lawson, William Kuebler, Dr. Bernard M. Storch, W. E. Jacksdon and James Moores. Dr. Storch brought home a tusk a little more than three and a half inches long. He described the wild hogs as having manes which stood out 5 or 6 inches from their backs. At Santa Cruz Island another variety of wild hog was found, these being apparently domestic hogs which had grown wild. The Flyer visited Anacapa Island also, and put in at Santa Barbara because of the high win and heavy sea last Sunday. While off one of the islands the high wind caused the loss of the Flyer’s skiff, and for a day and a half those in the party were unable to get ashore for fuel or water. They finally found another harbor where they cold use a pier.”


September 28, 1911 [LAT/LB]: “C. B. Linton, who owns pearl and abalone concessions on San Nicolas and Santa Barbara islands, this morning purchased of Judge A. C. Lawson the launch Flyer, which he will use in transporting his shells to the mainland. Captain George Childs, formerly of the schooner Santa Rosa Island, will be in command.”


March 7, 1912 [LAT/LB]: “Abalones seized. Yesterday evening when the launch Flyer, owned by C. B. Linton Investment Company, came in from San Nicolas Island and landed at the city docks, she was immediately boarded by Deputy Constable Toler, who took charge of the boat and its freight which consisted of several tons of abalone shells and meat valued at $8000. The confiscation was made on behalf of Assistant State Fish and Game Commissioner Pritchard, who asserts that the season has closed for abalones and the shipment here is in violation of the law. The shells and meat were stored in a warehouse on the docks and will be held pending action by the authorities. The shells were gathered on San Nicolas Island, where Linton Company owns concessions.”


April 1, 1912 [LAT]: “C. B. Linton, who owns pearl concessions on San Clemente and San Nicolas islands, is fitting out his launch, Flyer, for a cruise down the Mexican coast looking for new concessions. He will be accompanied by Ralph Johnson and a party of Los Angeles mining men and scientists who have interests in the vicinity of Geronimo. The party expects to be absent two months.”


April 5, 1912 [LAT]: “Sea elephants game sought. The power schooner Flyer, owned by C. B. Linton, arrived from Long Beach today on the first leg of a cruise, which has for its purpose the capture of the only herd of sea elephants known to be in existence. There are ten sea elephants in the band. They have a value of about $5000 each and rendezvous on an island believed to be about 300 miles south of San Diego. The expedition was organized, so it was announced, for the purpose of exploring the coast of Lower California, the west coast of Mexico and the islands along the coast as far as Cedros Island. Provisions and fuel for a four months’ trip are aboard the Flyer. In addition, it is carrying a full equipment of arms, traps and other material necessary for the capture or killing of such specimens of animal and bird life as may be encountered. These will be turned over to Exposition Park Museum of Los Angeles, but the one great prize which the party seeks to get is the $50,000 herd of sea elephants. The existence of the sea elephants was discovered by a party of government scientists early last year. At that time two of the sea elephants were killed and five were brought to San Diego, carefully crated and shipped to the New York Zoo. They proved good travelers and recent reports from New York say that every one of the five is alive and healthy. The government scientists would not give out any information as to the island where the remaining ten sea elephants of the herd were left, but it is said on good authority that Captain Linton and his party have since secured this information and as a result the present expedition was commanded. George H. Child is in command of the Flyer. The other members of the party are George H. Willett, an ornithologist; H. N. Lowe, marine scientist; William McCluskey of the State Museum of Los Angeles; Ralph Johnson, Edward Bellringer, Paul McCreary and C. B. Linton.”


August 24, 1912 [LAT/SM]: “The gasoline launch Flyer of Long Beach, a sixty-foot vessel, came near foundering in the channel opposite this city this afternoon, after her air-pressure whistle tank had exploded, tearing a great hole in her side, deck and ribs. When she reached the municipal pier, the water from a big leak in her side had almost covered the engine, which just ran one minute after she reached the dock. The owner of the boat, C. B. Linton of Long Beach, who was with his wife, his wife’s sister Mrs. Dr. F. Earle Brown of Los Angeles, and Captain Bellringer of Long Beach, were on a trip to Santa Cruz Island, telephoned to Venice for help. Captain Al Hyder of the launch Nora, and Captain King of the launch McKinley, hastened to the spot…”


August 27, 1912 [LAT]: “Captain Al Hyder, owner and master of the launch Nora, which was instrumental in saving C. B. Linton’s launch Flyer from going to the bottom after an air tank explosion, says that the State boiler and hull inspectors have paid no attention to air tanks for whistles and other purposes aboard gasoline vessels, although these are the most dangerous of any machinery aboard. No rules regarding air tanks for whistles are contained in the regulations given masters, he says, and he thinks that the recent explosion on the Flyer will prove a good thing for public safety in that it will direct the attention of inspectors to the necessity for a more rigid inspection of vessels in this regard. Hyder took his vessel to San Pedro today, where she will go on the ways and be given a thorough overhauling, when he will test her whistle gauge and tanks.”


October 3, 1912 [LAT]: “J. R. Slevin, of the San Francisco Academy of Science, returned today from a five days’ cruise in the launch Flyer to Santa Barbara Island. He brought back several glass jars of little reptiles and a sack full of live island lizards.”


October 16, 1912 [LAT]: “Avalon. The Flyer, a fast powerboat out of San Pedro, and officers from the customs office who were aboard her, quietly dropped into Avalon Bay at 9 o’clock last night preparatory to a fast run to San Clemente Island for which place they left at 2 this morning. Among the meager information gained from two of the officers who came ashore last night would not warrant a positive statement, it is very evident, however, that the expedition is for the purpose of capturing smugglers of Chinese coolies who are supposed to be operating in the vicinity of San Clemente Island…”


May 23, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Justice of the peace J. G. Shoup and Captain Charles Hanson left this afternoon in the latter’s launch Flyer for Santa Cruz Island, where they will spend Sunday, returning to Santa Barbara Monday morning. They will go to the seaward side of the island and camp at Johnson’s Reef, a place noted for its isolation, beauty of scenery, and its fishing.”


May 24, 1914 [SBMP]: “Judge Jacob G. Shoup went to Johnson’s Reef on the south shore of Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon in Captain Charles Hanson’s powerboat, the Flyer. The judge is very appreciative of the island charms and he is a frequent visitor there. The boat will visit a number of the harbors on the lower side of the island, and will return to the mainland at an early hour tomorrow morning.”


August 24, 1914 [SBDNI]: “Three tons of abalone shells and one ton of meat was brought in to the wharf from Santa Rosa Island this morning by Captains Nidever and Hanson in the launch Flyer. The shells will be shipped to San Francisco.”


December 31, 1914 [SBMP]: “Charles Hanson and Scotty Cunningham of the powerboats Flyer and Sampan, respectively, are in from their fishing camps on Santa Cruz Island, to spend a the New Year holiday. They brought in very small quantities of fish and a very few crawfish. They report the fishing camps about all deserted, the fishermen having gone to their homes for the holidays.”


January 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “Charles Hanson same in from the islands yesterday for supplies for his craw fishing camp. He and Scotty Cunningham, who operate the powerboats Flyer and Sampan respectively, are working together, and are changing their camp from the bleak shore of Anacapa Island to Valdez Harbor...”


February 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “Captain Charles Hanson came over from Valdez Harbor yesterday in his powerboat, the Flyer, with rock cod.”


April 6, 1915 [SBMP]: “Charles Hanson, who runs the powerboat Flyer, has announced his intention of procuring a larger and better boat for the island excursion business on the channel. He has gone to San Pedro in his little boat to secure the better craft, and expects to have the latter in commission within a short time. Hanson is a very good sailor, and has decided popularity, and his friends think he will do well in the business contemplated.”


April 16, 1915 [LAH]: “Schooner Admiral Ashore on Island. San Diego, April 16.—The auxiliary schooner Admiral is beached at Guadalupe Island with little hope of salvage, according to word brought today by Captain T. J. Keeney of the schooner Flyer. The Admiral was in the service of the Guadalupe Island Company. President J. D. Hand of the company; W. B. Rowland, state veterinarian, and A. B. Pratt, meat buyer, returned on the Flyer from the island. No lives were lost on the Admiral.”


May 2, 1915 [NYT]: “Eleven members of the steamship Victoria which founded off the coast of Coronados Island on Friday, were picked up by the schooner Flyer today. They had taken to the lifeboats just before the Victoria sank.”


November 4, 1915 [SCICo]: “Sheriff Los Angeles County, Dear Sir: Persistent rumors have reached us that several parties have been stealing sheep from Santa Cruz Island and disposing of them in San Pedro and vicinity. In the vicinity of the place from where the sheep disappeared there have been hovering several boats, among them the Flyer which is operated by a man by the name of Charles Hansen, and the Columbus whose owner or operator is unknown… A.J. Caire”


April 18, 1916 [SBMP]: Captain Charles Hanson came over from Prisoners' Harbor in his powerboat, the Flyer, last Sunday, and will return to the island today to resume his fishing operations.”


March 15, 1917 [SBMP]: “Fears are felt for safety of Flyer. Report of loss off Santa Monica turns attention to local sloop. Some anxiety is felt in the local shipping circles for the safety of Captain Charles Hansen and his auxiliary sloop Flyer, with three men on board. This grows out of the report of a craft with three men being reported lost off Santa Monica in a gale last Saturday evening. Captain Hansen and his craft were at Santa Cruz Island last week and it was the intention to sail for San Diego Saturday morning. Captain Frank Nidever, who returned from the islands yesterday, says he saw Hansen at Pelican Bay during the morning, and that Hansen then said he would wait until the weather was more favorable. But nothing has been heard of the Flyer since then, and the Captain may have decided to continue on. In case he left before noon he could have reached a point off Santa Monica by evening. One of the men on the Flyer was Clarence Libbey and the third an old sailor, known here as Ben.”