Freia

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Freia (#) (-)



In the News~

December 1, 1896 [LAT]: “San Pedro, Nov. 30.—The schooner Freia, Captain Martin Bernson, put in here for shelter to await the subsiding of the heavy seas. The vessel is from Washington and is getting a cargo of abalone shells and meat, which she will carry back north. Her cargo is to be loaded aboard at San Clemente Island.”


March 21, 1897 [San Diego Union]: “The trouble over the guano schooner Freia has been averted, and the new owners, Capts. Harry Koch and Burk, have taken possession. Captain Bernson of the Freia succeeds to the schooner Lura, as part of the trade. He denied yesterday that he had skipped out with the Freia when called upon to deliver her to the new owners. He was a part owner, and when the new purchasers failed to pay he refused to turn the boat over.”


November 11, 1897 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Captain Burke, arrived yesterday with guano.”


November 11, 1897 [San Diego Union]: “The junk Hong Kong and sloop Impossible have sailed to the south coast for guano. The sloops Dot and Helena have arrived with cargoes of the same stuff. The schooner Freia is being overhauled for another trip down the coast. She will call at Cedros Island on the way back to get Jack Dampier, the hero of Natividad, and his two pals, who have been gathering abalone.”


November 14, 1897 [LAT]: “The schooner Freia brought up a number of large turtles, weighing several hundred pounds each, on her last trip. They were captured at Turtle Bay on the southern coast and were landed here for the trade alive and in good condition.”


December 23, 1897 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Captain Burke, arrived yesterday from San Benito Island with a cargo of abalone shells and meat.”


January 24, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “Out in the gale. Quite a number of the guano schooners are down the coast, scattered along without adequate shelter against such a storm. Fears are entertained that some of them may not ride through. They dare not put into Todos Santos or San Quintin, and there are no other harbors worthy the name. AMong the small craft now out are the sloop Impossible, Capt. Martin; the schooner Francine, Capt. Osterhouse, and the schooner Freia, Capt. Burke. The Francine and Freia sailed January 15 for the lower coast, and the Impossible sailed the following day.”


February 12, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, arrived yesterday with guano from the lower coast.”


March 12, 1898 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, arrived this morning from the lower coast with a cargo of guano.”


March 13, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia will be due in a week from the south coast.”


March 26, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia brightened paint and a thorough overhauling, slid into the bay from the E Street ways yesterday.”


March 28, 1898 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “Looks like murder. A sailor's body found floating in the bay... This afternoon Coroner Johnson began an investigation but at the suggestion of Chief Russell continued it until tomorrow. The only witnesses examined were Capt. Koch and the mate of the schooner Freia...”


April 1, 1898 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia sailed yesterday for the southern coast.”


April 15, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia arrived yesterday from San Benito Island, a short distance down the coast, with abalone shells and meat.”


April 15, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia arrived yesterday from San Benito Island, a short distance down the coast, with abalone shells and meat.”


April 24, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia sailed yesterday for the lower coast after guano.”


May 15, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia arrived yesterday from the lower coast with a cargo of guano.”


June 23, 1898 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia sailed today for Catalina with Messrs. Burke and Koch and families, who will spend several weeks on the island.”


July 21, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner, Capt. Burke, sailed yesterday for the southern coast for a cargo of guano.”


October 21, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia arrived from the south yesterday morning with a cargo of fertilizer.”


November 16, 1898 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, arrived yesterday from San Benito Island, Lower California, with guano.”


February 22, 1899 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, arrived yesterday from the lower coast with a cargo of guano.”


April 24, 1899 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia arrived last night from the southern coast with a cargo of fertilizer.”


August 28, 1899 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia is being fitted with a 16-horse power gasoline engine and will soon resume her trips to the southern coast.”


November 29, 1900 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia sailed yesterday for the Lower California coast with a cargo of dynamite for the copper mines.”


December 6, 1900 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia arrived this morning from the Lower California coast where she took a cargo of dynamite for the copper mines.”


April 16, 1901 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia will leave today for the south under charter to R. D. Daggett. She goes to Ensenada and from there to one of the landings used by the people who are developing the copper mines along the west coast of the peninsula.”


May 6, 1901 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia returned yesterday morning the lower coast, having been sent down there with supplies. She came back light, and Capt. Burke reports that the mining men in the peninsula are putting in full time prospecting and mining.”


May 29, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The power schooner Freia is to sail tomorrow for Lower California with a cargo of giant power for the copper mines.”


May 30, 1901 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The power schooner Freia left for Ensenada today with supplies for the mining companies.”


May 31, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia will clear today for Ensenada with a cargo of giant powder. She will take her cargo as far as Ensenada, where it can be transferred to the St. Denis. The laws of the United States are such that she could not carry explosives out of here, but the laws of Mexico do not stop her.”


July 27, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “Arrived with guano. The schooner Freia, Captain Burke, arrived yesterday from Lower California with a cargo of 15 tons of guano from White Rock for the Lower California Development Company.”


July 28, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia is discharging a cargo of guano for the Kishlar Fertilizer Company.”


August 8, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, which came in recently from the south with a cargo of guano foe the Lower California Development Company, has taken on a cargo of giant powder and hay for San Domingo landing, and has cleared for Ensenada, in which custom district San Domingo is located.”


August 31, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia is expected in today from Lower California with gold ore and concentrates, from the mines at Calamalli.”


September 2, 1901 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia, Captain Burke, arrived yesterday from Lower California with a cargo of gold bullion and concentrate.”


September 4, 1901[San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The Schooner Freia Leased for a Trip to Guadalupe Island. Sebastian Camacho, one of a large Mexican improvement company, has been in the city for some days looking for a suitable schooner with which to make a trip to Guadalupe Island. His company of which Emelo Carazo is president has leased Guadalupe Island from the Mexican government for a period of 15 years. The señor will make the present trip to investigate the island and to decide into which enterprise his company had better launch to make the most of the natural resources. Among other things being considered is the breeding of special brands of Angora goats. The island contains some 210 square miles and will no doubt amply repay the speculators. Señor Camacho has leased the local schooner Freia to make his preliminary prospecting trip. He will return to this city in the course of a month or two.”


September 28, 1901 [LAT]: “The schooner Freia, which left here some two weeks ago to go to certain concessionaires of the Mexican government, is expected to return to San Diego harbor this morning. The concession granted by the Mexican government gives to three men to whom it is granted all of the personal property on the island. The property consists of immense herds of goats whose value consists almost entirely of what can be secured from a sale of their hides. The Freia was at Ensenada while the St. Denis was there, and the steamer brought up the report that when the Freia arrived at the island the schooner Lou was there loading a number of hides which had been gathered by the hunters. The concessionaires asserted their rights, and the Lou, with her crew, set sail for San Diego. The concessionaires found readily to their hand about 900 hides which the hunters had killed for the schooner Lou. The Freia loaded the 900 hides and will bring them here today.”


September 30, 1901 [LAT]: “Lost Their Hides. The schooner Freia, which some weeks ago took to Guadalupe Island a party of prospectors who have obtained a Mexican concession of complete right to the island, is expected to return here soon. The party found the schooner Lou at the island loading goat hides, and asserted their rights as concessionaires. The schooner sailed as quickly as possible for this port with the hides already aboard, and left about 900, valued at approximately $400, in the hands of the Mexican owners of the island. The Freia loaded them on board and they for a part of her return cargo.”


October 17, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “Will import a million goats. Mexican Company Has Secured Control of the Guadalupe Islands. E. Carazo and three other men who went to the Guadalupe Islands some three months ago, in the interest of a company with headquarters in the City of Mexico, and which has secured a concession to the islands for a term of fifteen years, were passengers on the schooner Freia, which arrived in port yesterday from the islands. The Freia brought 820 goat skins which had been left on the isalnd by four hunters who had killed 3,500 goats, but were unable to take away all the hides on one trip with their vessel. Mr. Carazo says he is well satisfied with the result of his trip, and will recommend to his company that the island be stocked with a Million Mexican goats. They will be imported from the state of Guanajuato, but before the animals are taken to the islands it will be necessary to develop more water. This can be done by opening the springs of which there are ten or more on the island. The company that has secured control of these islands will prohibit the further illegal killing of the seals, and will establish at least a dozen families there to take charge of the animals.”


December 5, 1901 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, sailed this morning for the lower coast with a party of prospectors who are looking for copper and iron locations.”


December 5, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “The power schooner Freia has been chartered for a prospecting trip down the coast of Lower California, and will sail from here today or tomorrow.”


December 24, 1901 [San Diego Union]: “Among the passengers are Marcos Bruschi and J. S. Schirm, who, in company with David Goldbaum of Ensenada, had been on a prospecting trip on the power schooner Freia along the coast as far south as Scammon's Lagoon. The prospectors declare that they found what they were looking for, and are well pleased with the success of their trip. They left the Freia at Cedros Island, and came up by steamer.”


December 27, 1901 [San Diego Union]: ““The schooner Freia entered at the custom house yesterday as having come up the coast in ballast. She is in command of Capt. Koch, and has had several prospecting parties out along the coast of the peninsula within the past few months.”


January 11, 1902 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The little schooner Freia has taken on a full cargo and is lying at the Spreckles' wharf. She will sail tonight or early tomorrow for Ensenada.”


January 13, 1902 [San Diego Union]: “The schooner Freia, Capt. Burke, sailed yesterday morning for Lower California. She carries a full cargo of provisions for the Ybarra mine. SHe also has aboard several prospectors who are going inland from the Ybarra mines. She will probably bring back a cargo of guano for the Lower California Development company. ”


February 6, 1902 [San Diego Evening Tribune]:


February 8, 1902 [San Diego Union]: “ “The power schooner Freia, Capt. Koch, arrived yesterday four days from Ensenada, having had some trouble with her engines and having met with head-winds. She came from far down the coast, having received her cargo at the mines at Calamalli, which is about opposite Cedros Island. She brings gold bullion to the value of $2875, gold concentrates valued at $450 and copper ore valued at $1400. The captain reports that the peninsula had an extraordinary good rain all the way down the coast as far as he had been... ”


July 4, 1902 [San Diego Union]: “The Freia Sold. The Pacific Fishing and Exploration company has bought the gasoline schooner Freia for the use at their cannery in San Quintin. The Freia is 59 feet in length with an 11-foot beam and will be used in bringing in the large catches of crawfish. The Todos Santos, another of the company's boats will be used as a tender for the cannery as she is too small for hauling fish.”


July 12, 1902 [San Diego Evening Tribune]: “The schooner Freia sailed for San Quintin last night. She has been purchased by the Pacific Coast Fishing and Exploration company.”


July 25, 1902 [San Diego Union]: “The Cannery at San Quintin. Plenty of fish to can, but lacking in facilities for handling them. The power boat Freia will have been sent through Ensenada custom house by now... We purchased the power schooner Freia for the purpose of taking her south to handle the lobsters from various camps. We buy from the fishermen by the ton, and agree to take all they catch. They have their camps, where they can catch the most lobsters and our power boats go to them and gather the catches of all camps and bring them to the cannery, which is situated on the west side of San Quintin bay, not very far from the round house of the San Quintin railroad, as it was started some years ago...”