Glendale

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Glendale (# ) ( -1904) wrecked at Anacapa Island December 24, 1904.



In the News~

January 4, 1905 [LAT/OX]: “The gasoline launch Glendale was piled up on the rocks of Anacapa Island Christmas eve and totally wrecked. The craft belonged to a Hueneme fishing company, which was engaged in crawfishing and had a camp on Santa Cruz Island near Smugglers Cove. The party left the camp on the preceding Friday intending to fish on the banks off the east point of Anacapa, but the heavy weather prevented and they anchored near the beach at Merry’s camp, expecting that the storm would soon subside. Instead of subsiding, it developed into a stiff northeaster, and as they were unable to leave their exposed position, they made things snug to ride it out at their mooring. Early Saturday night Jerry Shively and a man named Ross, who were sleeping aboard, were awakened by the unusual pitching of the boat, and upon investigating found the cockpit half full of water and the motor submerged beyond all hope of starting it. Seeing that the launch was gradually sinking, they took their tender, which had been made fast astern, and put off for shore. They rode in on the top of a big comber and made a landing that was spectacular to a high degree. The Glendale tugged at its moorings for a while, but finally dragged, went on the rocks and was battered to smithereens. The fishermen’s friends, becoming alarmed at their long absence, induced Captain Swenson, who happened along at Hueneme with the yawl Leone, to go to their assistance. Swenson found them near his old fishing camp, and brought them to the mainland in time for their New Year’s dinner. It is said that one of the party is still marooned at the Santa Cruz Island camp, but as he has plenty of provisions, he will be none the worse for his lonesome holiday season.”


January 6, 1905 [OC]: “Big Jerry Shively and Jack Ross, who have been running the gasoline fishing craft Glendale near Santa Cruz and Anacapa islands for some time, had a most exciting experience and a narrow escape from drowning at the latter last week. The party left the camp on the preceding Friday, intending to fish on the banks off the east point of Anacapa, but the heavy weather prevented, and they anchored at the beach near Merry’s camp, expecting that the storm would soon subside. Instead of subsiding, it developed into a stiff northeaster, and as they were unable to leave their exposed position, they made things snug to ride it out at their mooring. Early Saturday night the two men, who were sleeping aboard, were awakened by the unusual pitching of the boat, and upon investigation found the cockpit half-full of water and the motor submerged beyond all hope of starting it. Seeing that the launch was gradually sinking, they took their tender, which had been upon the stern, and put off for the shore. They rode in on top of a big pounder, and made a landing that was spectacular to a high degree. The Glendale tugged at its moorings for awhile, but finally dragged west of the rocks and was battered to smithereens. The fishermen’s friends, becoming alarmed at their long absence, induced Captain Swenson, who happened along at Hueneme with the yawl Leone, to go to their assistance. Swanson found them near his old fishing camp and brought them to the mainland in safety, while one of the party, who had been left in camp on Santa Cruz Island, was left to eat his New Year’s dinner alone — but he had plenty pf provisions and fared fully as well, if not better than his unfortunate partners. It is stated that Jerry returned to the island the first of this week and waded out to his wrecked launch and took the gasoline engine — a four-horse power one — to land, where, with a little repair work, it will be made to do service in a new craft.”