Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island

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Aerial of Lady's Harbor (left) and Baby's (right),
Santa Cruz Island
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, c. 1890
[original in SCIF archives]
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island
Baby's Cove is to the east (left)
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island
Lady's Harbor, Santa Cruz Island

Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island (Lady Harbor; Ladies Harbor; Lady’s Canyon), and its companion anchorage, Baby’s Cove (Little Lady's Cove) directly to the east, is located on the north side of the island about 6 miles east of the West End. It is to the west of Diablo Anchorage and to the east of Valdez Cove. The canyon leading down to Lady’s Harbor is almost directly north of Picacho del Diablo, the island’s highest peak. Lady’s Harbor was also a popular anchorage for camping and picnics. The harbor is a small anchorage and can accommodate but very few boats.

According to newspaper accounts, well-known Santa Barbara Italian fisherman, Captain Andres Larco, named this unnamed harbor ‘Lady Harbor’ in 1883. [see I.N. Cook photo p. 619 Overland Monthly 1891)



In the News~

August 11, 1883 [SBDP]: “A distinguished party of pleasure seekers sailed from Santa Barbara the other day for the islands… Captain Larco said he knew where there was a ‘ladies’ cove,’ not a cove that runs after ladies, you know, but a real quiet, romantic, wet sort of place where ladies love to bathe, and when he said ‘Let’s go gentlemen,’ we all said ‘let’s,’ and we went…”


September 3, 1883 [SBDP]: “An excursion to Lady Harbor. A newly discovered haven on Santa Cruz Island... Our party consisted of six including Captain Larco. After a delightful sail of about four hours in the Ocean King sloop, we reached Santa Cruz Island, anchoring in a small inlet about ten miles from the west end. Here we spent the night, in the morning we explored a cave in the vicinity which we named ‘Larco Cave’ in honor of our captain. This cave is 300 feet long, with a regular gallery 50 feet wide, the entrance a perfect arch, with an opening of about 10 feet, we rowed our boats to the end of this. After partaking of a hearty breakfast including fish of three or four kinds, the result of a heavy cast to the net by Larco, we sailed for the object of our cruise, Lady Harbor, about two miles from our anchorage of the preceding night. ‘Captain why do you call this Lady Harbor?’ such was the question put by your correspondent to Captain Larco on arriving at one of the most beautiful little harbors in the world. ‘Because,’ said the genial light-hearted Italian fisherman in his quaint and expressive way, ‘so nice, quiet, pretty, wind N.E., S.E., N.W., S.W., no move, like floor in your house, on board Ocean King here, sleep all the time you want, perfectly still. This little harbor is about due south from Santa Barbara, half way between the west end of the island and Prisoners’ Harbor. As you enter, the rocks rise almost perpendicularly some 500 feet high, with a rugged grandeur, and it is not until you are quite near the shore that you discover the entrance. The harbor is about 150 yards wide running hack half a mile, and here you land on a fine shingle beach, your boat literally glides to land, no rude surf to battle with, you step on shore as quietly as from a pond. Now a scene of beauty awaits you. On either side of a ravine, the mountains tower above you some 800 feet, from which you have a magnificent view of the coastline of the island. A stream of fine soft water runs down the ravine leaping from crag to crag, fed by two never failing springs, terminating in a pool where it lies calm and placid, and affords a delightful bath to those who wish it. Shady live oaks are interspersed here and there, and there is abundance of dry firewood. I know of no more delightful camping ground with the advantages of sailing, boating and fishing... And if I may be allowed to advertise Captain Larco and his trim sloop the Ocean King, I would say, if any of your readers want a change of the healthful kind, engage Captain Larco to take you to Lady Harbor in his sloop.”


September 3, 1883 [SBDI]: “Lady Harbor. Last Wednesday evening the sloop Ocean King sailed from Santa Barbara with a select party of excursionists bound for the Island of Santa Cruz. Captain Larco had spoken enthusiastically of the beauties of a snug little cove upon the northwest side of the island and to which he had given the name of Lady Harbor… It is a land-locked bay hidden from observation from all sides and only discernable by entering it or looking down upon it from the highlands with which it is surrounded. Its waters are so clear that the bottom can be seen ten fathoms below as plainly as though no water intervened. The shores slope gently down from all sides to a cream-colored beach of crystal sand, which becomes gradually deeper as it nears the center of the bay. In the deepest portion there are a number of beautiful groves of tropical sea foliage, among which there are open avenues and pathways rendered fantastically attractive by the soft shadows of the gently waving seaweed which rises through the clear blue water to the surface, where it spreads out into luxuriant shady branches. The snow-white rocks, which rise from the smooth glittering bottom of the bay are ornamented with soft carpets of light green and pink sea moss, which is here and there enlivened with patches of carmine colored ocean vegetation of curious form… Since that day Larco has called this heretofore unnamed cove ‘Lady Bay.’…”


October 29, 1883 [SBDI]: “The seal presented to C. W. Clark by Captain Andres Larco has been mounted by Felix Jess, and presents a very lifelike appearance in the Morris House museum.”


January 4, 1884 [SBDI]: “The snug little craft, the Ocean King, lies ready at all times to carry parties safely back and forth, and Captain Andrea Larco, the skillful navigator and typical Italian fisherman, a thorough son of the sea, is a jolly commander… In the evening the party was lying around the camp fire in Lady’s Cove, the weird outline of the island indistinctly outlined against the dark blue canopy of the heavens, and the strange cries of wild animals alone to break the strange silence of the lonely island shore, they were startled by a large rock rolling down the hill into camp. Those with fire arms sprung for their rifles, but nothing appearing, concluded the stone was dislocated by some nearby sheep…”


January 21, 1884 [SBDI]: “…the far famed Lady’s Harbor, paradise of the hunter, the fisher, the painter, the geologist, the naturalist or in fact anyone who loves nature in her own wild beauty… the fish are so plentiful that two at a time are caught if hooks are put on the line. The seine was let down and 500 pounds of fish were caught, some delicate morsels of snapper weighing from two and one half to fifteen and twenty pounds.”


Spring of 1887 J. Walter Fewkes remarks: “…One of the most beautiful of all the canons which we passed was Lady’s Cañon, a most picturesque place with smooth water and cliffs rising on all sides. The scenery here is very grand…” (Across the Santa Barbara Channel in The American Naturalist XXIII:268 (212), April 1889.


April 29, 1887 [Mrs. Harrison Grey Otis]: “[Lady’s Harbor] extends inland about 500 feet and is protected on either hand by bare, craggy heights of volcanic rocks, bare save where here and there clings a dwarf oak, a bit of spring grass or slender shrub, or some green and graceful vine, whose drooping tendrils hang like a curtain down its sides, full of magenta-colored blossoms. The harbor is fronted by a low sandy beach, perhaps 150 feet in length, and beyond this is a green and tree-shaded cañon extending backward for about 250 yards, and terminating at the base of vast heights behind which the sun sinks at about 3:30 in the afternoon. Down this height through a narrow thread of cañon comes leaping and singing in many cascades a pretty stream of clear water, while from the heights on the left, through a narrow cleft, pours another stream, falling like the other, in diminutive cataracts, and dropping at length over a wall of rock into a deep circular pool. The two streams join each other at a little distance from their pool-like beds, run for a few yards underground, then burst forth again at the base of an overhanging rock. Hundreds of lively pollywogs revel in this lower pool, and here frogs meet at evening for a grand serenade.”


May 8, 1887 [SBMP]: “Tent and sail. Afloat and ashore at the Island of the Holy Cross. In the sea lion’s liar… Last week a memorable trip was made to Santa Cruz Island by a party made up of the following persons: Mr. And Mrs. Frank Sleeth, Mr. Eltinge Roe, son of E. P. Roe the novelist, H. C. Ford, the landscape painter, Mrs. Ford, Mrs. E. A. Otis of the Los Angeles Times corporation, Miss Sadie Roe, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kinsell of the Press. The taunt and trim little sloop Genova manned by Captain Andre Larco and sailor Joe, sailed away to the west… Lady’s Harbor than which no prettier or more picturesque spot can be found we believe… The whole landscape seemed brilliant with April grass and flowers… We had reached a fairyland. Supper was quickly prepared over a great fire of beach wood. The tent was pitched, other couches and hammock arranged under a wide branching willow, and our first night quickly passed, lulled through by the babbling music of the falls and most remarkable chorus of frogs. There must have been a national convention of them…”


April 23, 1888 [SBMP]: “The party of young men that went over to Santa Cruz Island last week returned today. They report finding the body of a man who had evidently been washed ashore.”


April 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “A party consisting of Alex More, George Hall, Charles Hall, John B. Ward and J. Delaney, who have been over to Santa Cruz Island on a short visit, returned in the sloop Brisk last Sunday. Mr. Delaney reports that while prospecting about on the island, they found the remains of a man about half a mile from Lady Harbor. The body had evidently been in the water for some time and could not possibly have been recognized by any body who might know the unfortunate man. The party buried the remains on the island near the spot where they were found.”


June 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The Islands. The Adventures of the Mariners on their First Trip. The Charms and Mysteries of Santa Cruz. Myriads of Seals. Caves and Cliffs… a party of expectant adventurers gathered upon the deck of the little sloop Brisk, surrounded by a picturesque collection of guns, blankets and camp utensils. The little yacht sailed out to the tuneful lay of guitar and harmonicas… as the wind was blowing almost a gale, the skipper decided not to try to make Lady Harbor, fifteen miles further north…”


1889: Lorenzo Yates and Henry Chapman Ford visited Lady’s Harbor in 1889 where they “climbed the precipitous slopes near, and upon the rocky ridges found large groups of Lyonothamnus [ironwood trees].”


August 27, 1891 [SBMP]: “On Monday morning, August 10th, a party of sixteen… embarked on the little vessel Big Loafer, Captain Brownsill in command… On the following day we started in search of the various points of interest… Another spot of great interest is the Needle’s Eye, a large pointed rock two miles west of Lady Harbor. It reaches a height of perhaps fifty feet and rests upon a beautiful arch, thus giving the rock the resemblance of a needle. Within close proximity to this rock is a huge seal rookery…”


August 18, 1892 [SBMP]: “Captain Brownsill arrived from the islands yesterday in the Big Loafer. He brought over Miss Everett, one of the schooner Ruby’s party, who was suffering from consequence of a close contact with poison oak. Captain Brownsill left Dr. Hall and party at Lady’s Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. They were having a splendid time and decided to remain a week or ten days more. Captain Brownsill returns today with a supply of provisions.”


August 31, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “There is trouble on the island kingdom of President Justinian Caire of the Santa Cruz Island Company. It appears that Mr. Caire has had his son on the island as superintendent, and that there is considerable pains being taken to discourage people from landing thereon. Two young men from this city, R. Vasquez and Manuel Alves, have been on the island since July 15 gathering abalone shells and abalones from the rocks and cliffs on the north side. They had collected fifteen sacks of abalone meat and twelve sacks of shells, and on the 24th began taking them to Surprise Harbor, where the schooner Restless was to come and take the boys and their load to this port. It proved to be a surprise harbor for them, for when they were bringing their last load in the skiff from Lady Harbor, they saw the gasoline launch Santa Cruz leaving in a hurried manner, and on following her in a skiff, found that she had taken their stuff on board. They went to the superintendent, but he would give them no satisfaction and ordered them away. Saturday they swore to a complaint charging young Mr. Caire and the steam schooner’s captain with theft, and Constable Dan Dover left for Santa Cruz Island on the Restless Sunday with the intention of arresting the two men.”


July 31, 1895 [LAH]: “The carrier pigeons between Santa Cruz Island and this city still fail to carry, but a sloop arrived today from Ladies’ Harbor and Cueva Valdez with the news that the hordes of Barbarians were enjoying good health and having a splendid time.”


July 7, 1897 [SBDI]: “The latest Land of Sunshine, the Los Angeles magazine, contains an article on ‘Caves of Santa Cruz Island,’ by Rob. C. Owens and illustrated with beautiful, clear cut views of Cueva Valdez, Painted Cave, Ladies’ Harbor and the Arch.”


October 16, 1898 [LAT]: “Fresh literature. A new western poet. By the Western Sea by Marshall Ilsley… One of the best of these [poems] which ‘smack of the soil’ is ‘Lady Harbor,’ whose first half dozen verses describe the picturesquely beautiful harbor of Santa Cruz Island. The latter portion compares ‘this plumy place’ with the ugliness of a great city…”


July 20, 1900 [SBMP]: “The island beaches are more popular with campers every year. Several parties are camping there. George S. Edwards left yesterday for Lady's Harbor with a party...”


April 21, 1904 [SBMP]: “Sunday afternoon the launch Peerless came in with a large party of Santa Barbara people who had been to the seal caves and passed the night at Ladies' Harbor.”


September 25, 1904 [SBMP]: “Anxiety felt for campers. Photographer Leach and Daughter Supposed to Have Started Home from Islands. Considerable anxiety was manifested yesterday by the friends of Photographer E. A. Leach and daughter, Miss Agnes Leach, who in company with Orin Seeley have been camped at Ladies' Harbor, on Santa Cruz Island, for over a week. It is feared that they may have suffered from the storm, as they are in an exposed place, and had nothing to protect themselves from the storm, not even a Camper's tent. Fred Wale, who went over later in his yacht, Alleene, is also with the party. The Pride went over yesterday morning and it is expected that they will be safe in their homes today.”


November 4, 1904 [SBMP]: “Captain Vasquez brought sad news last night. Captain Colice Vasquez arrived from Santa Cruz Island last night at 10 o'clock bringing news of S. W. Cooney, a Grand Rapids Michigan man who had been in Santa Barbara since last April for his health. Mr. Cooney, who was passionately fond of fishing and boating went to the island last week to visit a party of campers at Lady's Harbor. On last Monday he took a row boat and went out on the bay for an afternoon's fishing and has not been seen since...”


November 7, 1904 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Colice Vasquez of the launch Peerless has returned from Santa Cruz Island with unquestionable news of the sad death of S. W. Cooney, a Grand Rapids, Michigan man who had been in Santa Barbara for his health since last April.


June 20, 1905 [SBMP]: “Gem of island is Santa Cruz... Friars Harbor, a favorite camping place with the Santa Barbara and Ventura people, with a pretty little beach, and Lady’s Harbor, a land-locked shelter with a deep canyon running back into the mountains that rise nearly 3,000 feet, yielded six separate varieties of fern...”


August 15, 1905 [SBMP]: “Last week the power launch Naiad took an excursion to Quava [Cueva] Valdez, Painted Cave, Lady’s Harbor, and other points of interest on the island...”


August 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “The yacht Echo arrived from the south with a party of San Pedro people. The excursionists spent two days at Santa Cruz Island visiting I. B. Yates and E. P. Stevens at their camp at Lady’s Harbor.”


September 1, 1905 [SBMP]: “E. P. Stevens and I. B. Yates and a party have returned from Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island where they spent two weeks in camp.”


October 17, 1905 [SBMP]: “A party consisting of Ed Stafford, Dwight Faulding, and Ray Leslie, Santa Barbara boys who are enjoying a week’s vacation from school, will leave today on the launch Irene for Lady’s Harbor. They will take along full camp equipment and food supplies, and are prepared to spend the week in fishing and camping on the shores of Santa Cruz.”


June 19, 1906 [SBMP]: “Captain Merry went over to Lady's Harbor and taking on a party of nine Oxnard people, sailed at once for Hueneme. Here the campers disembarked and the Vishnu returned to this city after making the entire trip in one day. The Oxnard party was headed by Lester DeWitt and H. C. Burt. They spent two days on San Miguel Island and ten days on Santa Cruz Island.”


July 20, 1906 [SBMP]: “E. P. Stevens, Mr. Stafford and others are camped out at Ladies Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, where they have been for several days. They are being supplied with provisions and dispatched from the mainland by the launch Peerless.”


June 4, 1907 [SBMP]: “A jolly island party... embarked Saturday afternoon on the power yacht Vishnu, bound for Lady's Harbor and Forney's Cove at the west end of Santa Cruz Island where fish was found in such great numbers the party soon tired of the sport. The Vishnu was headed for her home port of Santa Barbara where they landed at 6 P.M., declaring the whole trip the most enjoyable they have ever taken.”


August 13, 1907 [SBMP]: “Two camping parties go to the island today with Captain Henry Short in the launch Charm. Ed Stevens and family go to Ladies Harbor for two weeks...”


June 26, 1908 [SBMP]: “Ben Stafford and a party are camped at Lady's Harbor.”


July 22, 1908 [SBMP]: “Mrs. M. V. Wheeler and her daughters have just returned from a four days’ cruise and camping trip to Santa Cruz Island with Captain George Gourley on the launch Vamoose. They camped at Lady’s Harbor and visited the Painted Cave, the various camps and all the other interesting points, returning yesterday afternoon.”


May 11, 1909 [SBMP]: “Captain Fred Fanning and a party of eight visited Santa Cruz Island Sunday in his launch Wynona. The party consisted of Captain Fanning, “Jolly” Rogers, Bill Cornwall, Pete Jordano, Fritz Maxfield, Walter Jerow and R. Down. The Wynona left here at 1:10 A.M. Sunday and reached Valdez Harbor at 5:30 A.M. On the way over, all but three succumbed to seasickness. Maxfield was the first victim and the balance of the party succumbed in turn. Breakfast was had at Valdez Harbor. The party went to Painted Cave, then to Lady’s Harbor where they ate dinner...”


May 16. 1909 [SBMP]: “R. H. Morris, a photographer of this city, left on the Santa Cruz Island boat yesterday to spend a week at the island taking pictures of the Company. Mr. Morris will make his headquarters at the ranch house near Prisoners’ Harbor and from there he will tramp over the hill and up and down the coast taking pictures as his fancy directs. The Santa Cruz Island Company for whom he is going is desirous of having views of the ranch house, the vineyard, and the sheep-shearing scenes and the herds of cattle. He will also get pictures of Lady’s Harbor, the Painted Cave, the Arch Rock, and many other beauty spots on the island.”


June 10, 1909 [SBMP]: “E. P. Stevens and his brother, C. B. Stevens and their families with Robert Doulton will set sail in the Charm this morning for Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, for two weeks of camping. Ed Stevens usually seeks the island delights three or four times during the summer, as he has done for years past and for a long time he has made Lady’s Harbor his camping place. He declares it to be the most beautiful spot on Santa Cruz ‘or any other old island any other old where.’”


April 16, 1911 [SBMP]: “...There was much to interest the party at Ladies Harbor, although the canyon here was narrow and not suitable for a large crowd of campers. Water is good and abundant, wood plentiful, and the bay, while small has a tributary inlet called Baby's Harbor which can be easily reached by boat, but is practically inaccessible over the abrupt and precipitous bluffs...”


July 4, 1912 [SBMP]: “A party of clerks from Trenwith’s store and their friends, will enjoy the Fourth on the channel, having chartered the Gussie M. They will cross to Santa Cruz Island, and picnic at Lady’s Harbor.”


July 24, 1912 [SBMP]: “Many parties camping on Santa Cruz and Anacapa during summer… Another party, recruited largely from the First National Bank at Los Angeles, has a fine camp at Lady’s Harbor. These people have engaged Captain Gourley’s Vamoose for a week, in order that they may cruise about the various islands and visit the Painted Cave and other natural wonders…”


November 23 , 1912 [SBMP]: “…The same swell, it may be imagined, has been even more effective in the outer channel, and around the islands. It has kept Captain Vasquez from filling an order for live seals. He returned yesterday in the Gussie M after several days of fruitless efforts. Returning with him was a party of Los Angeles people who have been camping at Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island.”


In 1913, Ira Eaton said he “left a man at Lady’s Harbor who wanted to lead the life of a wild man. The man had just gotten tired of city life and wanted to get away from it all.” He was a heavy set, broad-shouldered Dane, 35 years old, with blue eyes and light curly hair who studied botany according to Margaret Eaton. He had brought a box of apples and expected to live on fish for the time he was on the island. At Lady’s Harbor, he built a crude hut. [Eaton 1980: 196]. » Wild Man of Santa Cruz Island


March 27, 1913 [SBMP]: “Back to nature apostle at Lady’s Harbor for strenuous following of old creed. Husky Dane wears girdle only, kills his food with slingshot, shuns people. Recent visitors to Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, report the discovery of a ‘near-to-nature’ disciple, who lives in a rude hut fashioned with his own hands from bark and driftwood, eats only such food as he can gather or kill by the crude means of a slingshot fashioned after that used by David in his combat with Goliath, wears only a girdle, and avoids human companionship so far as possible. The man, a Dane, well built, about 35 years of age. And except for his freaky desire to become a hermit and adopt the habits of primitive man, appears to be of sound mental capacity. Members of the Murphy party who recently cruised around Santa Cruz Island, came upon the big Dane when they camped at Lady’s Harbor. When they landed on the beach, the fellow was observed at the summit of the mountain that rises abruptly from the shore. Later in the day he came nearer the camp, and they were able to converse with him. He was reticent as to his own history, his means of reaching the island and where he came from, but he said he had been there about a month, and expected to remain indefinitely, his object being to test the possibility of civilized man adopting the mode of life followed by the aborigines. He has no firearms, no matches, no cutlery, dishes or other facilities that modern man has come to consider indispensable. He makes fire with flint, catches fish with crude bone hooks, kills animals with a slingshot, and in all other respects resorts to primitive customs.”


March 31, 1913 [LAT]: “Primitive Dane found on Santa Cruz Island. Recent visitors to Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, report the discovery of a ‘near to nature’ disciple, who lives in a rude hut fashioned with his own hands from bark and driftwood, eats only such food as he can gather or kill by the crude means of a slingshot, fashioned after that used by David in his combat with Goliath, wears only a girdle, and avoids human companionship so far as possible. The man is a Dane, well-built, about 35 years of age and except for his freaky desire to become a hermit and adopt the habits of primitive man, appears to be of sound mental capacity. Members of the Murphy party who recently cruised around Santa Cruz Island, came upon the big Dane when they camped at Lady’s harbor. When they landed on the beach the fellow was observed at the summit of the mountain that rises abruptly from the shore. Later in the day he came nearer the camp and they were able to converse with him. He was reticent as to his own history and his means of reaching the island and where he came from, but he said he had been there about a month and expected to remain indefinitely, his object being to test the possibility of civilized man adopting the mode of life followed by the aborigines. He has no firearms, no matches, no cutlery, dishes or other facilities that modern man has come to consider indispensable. He makes fire with flint, catches fish with crude bone hooks, kills animals with a slingshot and in all other respects resorts to primitive customs.”


April 16, 1913 [SBMP]: “Frank A. Garbutt and Captain Rosaline Vasquez’ Otter ready for sea. Captain Rosaline Vasquez will bring his new excursion boat, the Otter, to Santa Barbara next Tuesday. The Otter is expected to popularize the island trip among the Santa Barbara people… The new boat is 52 feet long, has a beam 12.9 and 6 feet draught. Her engines are 55 horsepower, and in addition there is a full suit of sails, giving the Otter the equipment of a yacht. She was built by the San Pedro Marine Construction Company, and is said to be the classiest of her type ever seen in the southern harbor. The arrangements for the comfort of passengers is also unusual. There are 14 Pullman berths, and a seating capacity of 60. Vasquez says that the Otter will make the passage from Santa Barbara to Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, in from two hours to two hours and ten minutes. The charge will be $2.50 for the round-trip. At Lady’s Harbor, a tent city will be provided for the entertainment of guests at $3 a day...”


May 23, 1914 the Daily News reported Mrs. H. C. Sexton and friends had spent 8 days camping at Lady’s Harbor, and “they brought back a number of curious Indian relics and quite a few beautiful ferns.” The big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) is also found in the vicinity. This place name appears on the Santa Cruz Island Sheet B topographic map.


June 26, 1914 [OC]: “…Captain H. Bay Webster… and the nine fishermen who left Oxnard a week ago Tuesday night, and remained away 11 days… remaining on San Miguel over night they started back for Santa Cruz on Monday, giving Santa Rosa a wide berth. The landing was made at Lady’s Harbor, which is a very beautiful spot. The camp was pitched near the landing spot, and four days were spent on the island in having all kinds of good times...”


August 16, 1914 [LAT]: “Coast Yacht Club, Friar’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. August 12. With eleven yachts and some sixty-off yachtsmen aboard, anchored at this little harbor, the summer cruise of the South Coast Yacht Club proved a big success… The Royal is at Ladies Harbor…”


April 9, 1915 [SBDNI]: “That the pleasures of the channel waters and the beauties and wonders of the islands should be employed more systematically for the benefit of Santa Barbara is the opinion of those who made the trip to the islands Wednesday… aboard Captain Eaton’s boat Sea Wolf. They skirted the coast of the island, visited the big cave and had lunch at Valdez Harbor. The other beauty spots visited were Painted Cave, the Ruby Rock, La Canada, Cueva Valdez, Arch Rock, Ladies Harbor, Dick’s Harbor, Mussel Rocks, the Orizaba, Twin Harbors and Pelican Bay. The party climbed the mountains back of Pelican Bay and gathered many wild flowers there…”


June 30, 1915 [SBDNI]: “The remainder of this week and the rest of next will keep Captain R. Vasquez and business agent B. Hilbing of the Otter more than busy, so that they will not have much time to observe July 4th. Friday night the Otter will carry a big party of Normal School students, men and women, numbering 40 persons, from this city to Valdez Harbor, leaving here at 12:30 P.M. Friday, and returning here early Tuesday morning in time for them to resume their day. Saturday evening a good-sized party will board the boat for the islands, a portion of the voyagers having Fry’s Harbor as their destination, and the remainder going to Ladies’ Harbor. The Fry’s Harbor party will return Sunday, and the others the following day. Sunday morning the Otter will cross the Channel again, leaving Stearn’s Wharf at 8 o’clock, carrying another sizable party across to the magic isle, and bringing part of them back Sunday evening. The rest will camp out until Monday evening.”


July 3, 1915 [SBMP]: “Carrying a party of 25 excursionists to Santa Cruz Island, the powerboat Otter will leave Stearn’s Wharf at 7 o’clock this evening for a Fourth of July excursion across the channel. The passengers will be taken to three of the island's most picturesque camping sites, Fry's Harbor, Ladies' Harbor and Valdez Cave...”


July 3, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Carrying a party of 25 excursionists to Santa Cruz Island, the powerboat Otter will leave Stearn’s Wharf at 7 o’clock this evening, for a Fourth of July excursion across the channel. The passengers will be taken to three of the island’s most picturesque camping sites, Fry’s Harbor, Ladies Harbor, and Valdez Cave. Some of the campers will return tomorrow night, while the others will remain on the mystic isle until Monday afternoon. The Otter will lead the water pageant Monday night, towing a fleet of handsomely illuminated small water craft.”


August 6, 1917 [SBDNI]: “Gilfred Kimberley, manager of the Hunt Mercantile Company, left this morning with a party for Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, for a two weeks’ camp.”


August 7, 1917 [SBMP]: “Camp at Lady’s Harbor. Last Sunday morning Guilford Kimberly and a party of seven of his men friends left in the Sea Wolf for two weeks’ camping at Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. Mr. Kimberly is a past (and resent) master at island camping, and as he always takes with him to the island shores those who are of congenial tastes, they may be sure of a pleasant time in their outing.”


May 17, 1920 [SCICo]: “It is undoubtedly true that campers have shot wild hogs and possibly sheep in the neighborhood of Cueva Valdez and Fry's Harbor. That these were parties to whom permits had been issued I think is a mistake, as I have issued only two such permits this season and one of those was not used. There have been some parties go in to those harbors to camp without permits however. I heard that Doulton of Miramar [Hotel] had a party in Lady's a week ago and I sent him a letter in regard to same by last trip of the schooner.”


July 26, 1924 [SBMP]: “Peveril Meigs, Jr., his 16-year-old son Stewart, and Walter Bishop reached Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, yesterday afternoon to search for the bodies of Dr. Harold Bishop of Alhambra, and Milton Stewart of Santa Barbara, with Mrs. Walter E. Wilkinson victims of a sailboat accident Tuesday morning off Arch Rock. Dr. Bishop was the brother of Walter Bishop, one of the searching party. The party is provisioned for a stay of ten days or longer. It was transported to the island by Captain Bob Ord of the Roncador. Upon leaving Lady’s Harbor Captain Ord headed toward San Miguel Island for cargo. He will return for the searchers in five days, it was stated. Mr. Meigs stated, before his departure, he had small hopes of recovering the bodies until they are washed ashore. Walter E. Wilkinson, husband of one of the victims, was yesterday reported to be steadily recovering from the effects of his battle with the waves. Mr. Wilkinson was the only member of the sailboat party to escape with his life.”