MORE, John Finley

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John Finley More (1839-1919)
Santa Barbara Cemetery


MORE, John Finley (1839-1919), ninth of twelve children and youngest son born to Peter and Martha More. More moved to Santa Barbara from Ohio in 1874, and was a Santa Barbara County resident for 45 years. He began with a 400-acre ranch on More Mesa in Goleta, and eventually owned 3000 acres. In later years he planted the first walnut trees for commercial purposes. John Finley More was for a brief time a partner with his brothers Alexander P. and Henry H. in the cattle and sheep business on Santa Rosa Island. For awhile, he acted as island superintendent.

On February 11, 1864 he married Miriam C. Hickox of Ohio. They had five children:

  • Julia Isabel “Belle” More (1864-1941)
  • Mary A. More (1866-1886)
  • Miriam Ellen More (1871-1943)
  • Alex Hickox More (1873-1890)
  • John Faxon More (1879-1933)

More served as administrator of his brother, A. P. More’s estate, until he was removed for incompetence and fraud. John Finley More died on April 27, 1919 and is buried in the large More family plot at the Santa Barbara Cemetery. His wife Miriam died on May 3, 1935 and is also in the Santa Barbara Cemetery.

[photo Gidney 1917]



In the News~

August 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “Mr. John More will take some forty sheepherders to Santa Rosa Island on Sunday by the steamer Santa Cruz.”


April 4, 1881 [SBDP]: “A. P. More and his niece, Miss Nellie, are in town.”


May 21, 1881 [SBDP]: “Miss Nellie K. More, daughter of A. B. More, the eldest of the More brothers, has been visiting the family of her uncle, Mr. John F. More, on Santa Rosa Island, for a couple of months. She returns to her home in San Francisco on the steamer Senator tomorrow.”


January 7, 1882 [SBDP]: “John F. More and wife leave for the city today. They will return in a few days.”


April 15, 1888 [SBMP]: “The steamer Coos Bay returned last Friday to Goleta from Santa Rosa Island with A. P. More and John F. More and family.”


May 11, 1889 [SBMP]: “A. P. More’s accident. The owner of Santa Rosa beaten by his shearers. Dr. R. F. Winchester returned yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island and brought the first authentic news in regard to the trouble at that place, about which so many rumors have been floating about. The doctor stated that he had been informed on the island that Alex P. More fell from a rock while driving sheep Tuesday night and had three ribs broken and his arm fractured in two places. Captain Thompson, who arrived at the island the same night, was unable to land, owing to the bad condition of the wharf and the rough weather, and the few words he heard shouted from the shore, started the stories about a desperate fight on the island. Mr. More’s wounds were carefully dressed by Dr. Winchester, but the sea was too rough to permit his removal and he was left on the island. There is no danger whatever of a fatal result of his injuries, in the doctor’s opinion. John More will probably start for the island this morning, and will bring his brother back as soon as he is able to be removed…”


May 12, 1889 [SBMP]: “John More started for Santa Rosa Island in the sloop Santa Rosa yesterday morning to bring his brother, Alex P. More, to this city.”


May 14, 1889 [SBMP]: “Captain Thompson of the schooner Santa Rosa returned from the islands yesterday, having left John and Lawrence More with their brother. A. P. More is still very ill from the results of his beating at the hands of the shearers and could not be moved.”


May 21, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday, bringing John More, the brother of the injured ranch owner. When the schooner left, A. P. More was doing well and able to move about on the island. Dr. Winchester returned yesterday to his patient to set the broken arm, which was too badly swollen on his previous visit to admit of being touched.”


June 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning, bringing over A. P. More, John More and family. Miss Alice Colt and Samuel Colt, who have been spending a couple of weeks on the island. Nothing was known on the island of the loss of a sailor from the sloop Liberty on June 15th, and he had not been washed ashore there. This disposed of the last chance of his safety and Ybarra was undoubtedly drowned.”


November 19, 1891 [SBMP]: “The steamer Farallon from San Diego, stopped in port yesterday morning to take aboard John More. The steamer left for Santa Rosa Island to get a cargo of wool for San Francisco.”


February 19, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “John F. More has gone to Santa Rosa Island for a week.”


1892: “Santa Rosa Island has an extent of about 55,000 acres and is a very valuable island for stock growing purposes, there are said to be on the island more than 50,000 sheep and a number of thousand of horses, mules and cattle. On the west end of the island are shifting sands. To a small extent the greater portion of the island however seems to be covered with plain and stretches of level country where there grow abundances of wild oats and other grasses. Numerous canyons run from the coast to the interior. In some of these are a considerable number of live oaks and shrubs. A considerable amount of low brush also grown on some of the steep hillsides. My collections were made from the northeast side of the island from one of the best wetland and timbered cañons on the island, so Mr. John More, manager of the island, informs me. I am indebted for kindness in allowing me to accompany him on his visit to the island and also for valuable information regarding the island.” [Streator, Clark P. Santa Rosa Island, California July 1 to 3, 1892, Unpublished Field Notes. Smithsonian Institution Archives. Record Unit 7176, Box 42, Folder 2.].


September 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday with J. F. More.”


October 19, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island with a crew of Chinamen who have been engaged in securing a cargo of abalone shells. Mr. John T. Moore [sic] will return on the boat.”


June 19, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Saturday night from Santa Rosa Island. Mr. J. F. More was passenger.”


July 6, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “John More of Santa Rosa Island is stopping in the city for a few days.”


September 12, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The funeral of Lawrence More took place Saturday afternoon from John F. More’s residence. A. P. More came down from San Francisco to attend the funeral.”


November 8, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “John F. More of this city has applied in San Francisco in Judge Coffey’s department of the Superior Court for the letters of administration on the estate of his brother, Alexander More, who died recently in Chicago.”


December 28, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The San Francisco Chronicle devotes several columns of space to a write-up of the content over the appointment of an administrator on the Alex More estate, and states that Alex More was worth at least $5,000,000. Mr. More lived for many years in this county, but had few friends, and almost no intimates, so that it is a difficult matter to find out just what his estate is worth. John F. More, his brother, has a lease of Santa Rosa Island, which contains 60,000 acres of land, the stock which is pastured on it bringing A. P. More a yearly income of $40,000. The share of Wallace More in the estate has been transferred to his brother T. R. [?] More, and deeds are on record here to that effect. Before the estate is settled up and divided, there promises to be a merry time. The statement that A. P. more left two illegitimate children here is denied by the heirs.”


February 26, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “John F. More has filed his report with the Probate Court as special administrator of the estate of his brother, A. P. More. From different banks the sum of $93,878 has been secured, possession of the Mescalitan Island, 660 acres, Santa Rosa Island, 62,000 acres, 35,000 head of sheep, 1500 cattle, 1300 goats. Estimated value of personal property other than money $130,000. Real estate not appraised. He holds also, a lease to a Santa Barbara ranch for three years, commencing October 1, 1891, with an annual rental of $10,000.”


February 19, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “John F. More filed on Wednesday with the County Clerk his bond as administrator of the estate of his late brother, Alexander P. More. The bond is in the amount of $500,000 and bears the names of a number of well-known capitalists as sureties in sums from $10,000 to $50,000 each. This is the heaviest bond ever filed in the Probate Court and was rendered compulsory by Alexander More having left no will naming executor or administrator to serve without bonds.”


March 9, 1894 [LAT]: “San Francisco. When John F. More applied recently to Judge Coffee to be appointed the executor of the estate of his deceased brother, Alexander P. More, owner of Santa Rosa Island, objection was made that he held advance claims, and, therefore, should not be permitted to act. This contention however, failed, as it was shown that the executor could not pass upon his own claims, as they came solely under the purview of the Probate Court. John F. More was appointed executor… John F. More paid $10,00 a year rent to his brother, and, in consequence, was entitled to the product of the ranch. It was in this way that he became a creditor of the estate, selling wood in large amounts to Alexander P. More, disposing of livestock on which the latter made collections, and in other ways.”


March 11, 1894 [SBMP]: “When John F. More applied recently to Judge Coffee to be appointed executor of the estate of deceased brother, Alexander P. More, owner of Santa Rosa Island, objection was made that he held advance claims, and therefore should not be permitted to act. This contention, however, failed, as it was shown that the executor could not pass upon his own claims, as they came solely under the purview of the Probate Court. John F. More was appointed executor, and submitted his claims, which were promptly denied by the court. By this act the Judge placed himself in the attitude of defendant when the executor might elect to bring suit. This occurred today, when Judge Coffee was served with a complaint and summons in the suit brought by John F. More against the estate of Alexander P. More. The amount claimed by the plaintiff is $32,467.09, with interest from October 21, 1893. As has been stated, A. P. More owned Santa Rosa Island, which was leased from him by John F. More. The full amount of the claim is $101,067.21, but credits are shown reducing it to the sum named in the action. John F. More paid $1000 a year to rent to his brother, and, in consequence, was entitled to the product of the ranch. It was in this way that he became a creditor of the estate, selling wood in large amounts to Alexander P. More, disposing of livestock, on which the latter made collections, and in other ways.”


July 27, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The case of ‘the Monte Cristo of Santa Rosa Island.’ Alexander P. More, which has been in the court ever since his death, is up again in another phase. More died intestate, and now his nephews, Albert W. More of Idaho and John C. More of San Francisco, want the estate distributed under the provisions of section 1386 of the Civil Code. They claim that under that they are justly entitled, and they now ask Executor John F. More to pay them a one twenty-seventh of the estate, which the last inventory appraises at $880,062. It is expected that other heirs will soon begin similar action against the estate. More, the executor, and one of the heirs, has already sued to get $33,287, aside from his share as one of the legal heirs.”


August 2, 1894 [SBDI]: “Mr. John More returned from the island yesterday afternoon on the schooner Santa Rosa.”


August 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “Concerning the estate of A. P. More for the past six months ending July 31st, John F. More, executor, states the income to be $94,689.24, expenditure $5,885.50. The estate is valued at $874,915.”


September 13, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The heirs of the late Alexander P. More are not satisfied with the appointment of John F. More, brother of the deceased, as administrator of the estate… On October 1, 1891 Alexander P. More leased to his brother, John F. More, Santa Rosa Island in the Santa Barbara Channel, together with certain provisions, supplies, implements and stock. The lease was for three years at a rental of $10,000 a year. At the expiration of the lease, John F. More is to turn over supplies equal in quantity and quality to those left on the island. The cattle were to be increased and kept up to 1500 head, and the sheep to 40,000 head, all of which are to be turned over on October 1. The heirs say in their petitions: ‘As the interests of John F. More are antagonistic to the interests of the estate, and he is obliged to account in a representative capacity and also individually, it is possible and probable that some serious questions of fact may subsequently arise as to the faithful performance of the covenants of the lease.’”


October 11, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The $1,000,000 estate of A. P. More, once ‘king of Santa Rosa Island,’ will now have to be sliced up. Judge Coffey today granted the petition of Mrs. C. A. Baldwin and Mrs. E. M. Miller for a partial distribution of the estate. Under the order they will now get $5377.50 in cash, and an undivided one-ninth interest in a large amount of mining and water stock. Executor John H. More objected to the distribution, but the court overruled his protests.”


December 12, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “Superior Judge Hebbard was engaged today in hearing the suit brought by John F. More against the estate of his brother, the late A. P. More, the Santa Rosa Island millionaire. John F. More is executor of the More estate and is in the peculiar position of suing himself for $33,000 for services rendered. As this sort of thing involves several intricate law-points, the attorneys are making a vigorous fight.”


June 8, 1895 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara, June 7. C. E. Sherman of this place, appointed by the Superior Court to examine the condition of cattle and sheep on Santa Rosa Island, being one vast holding of the estate of the late A. P. More, today rendered his report. Sherman states that Administrator John F. More, a brother of the deceased, and a lessee of the island, threw every possible obstacle in the way of his examination, and not until May of this year did he succeed in visiting the island and making an investigation. He found 25,000 sheep, one-fifth scabby, poor, and showing great neglect. There were only 1200 of this year’s lambs, whereas with proper care, there should have been fully 10,000. Three hundred and twenty-five sacks of this year’s clip of wool, and the clip of last fall was so commingled with the property of John F. More as to render impossible a separate account. The fences about the wharf were in good condition, but the fence across the island, which should have been built according to contract, has not been constructed. Sherman said that it was impossible to make a proper examination of the great island, as all horses there are under the direct control of John F. More, who refused to let him use them. More, according to the report, forced Sherman to sleep with Chinese and sheepherders on a mattress made of jute sacks with old wool sacks for bedding. The 1523 cattle on the island were the roughest band Sherman ever saw in thirty years’ experience as a cattleman. There were 155 horses, mules and colts, the greater part useless and valueless through careless breeding and handling. The report indicates great degeneracy in the condition of affairs in the short time since A. P. More’s death.”


June 23, 1895 [LAT]: “C. E. Sherman has made his report to Judge Coffey of the condition of affairs on Santa Rosa Island in the Santa Barbara channel. The island belongs to the estate of A. P. More, and is in charge of administrator John F. More, who is also one of the heirs. Sherman was appointed by the court to inspect the island and the personal property thereon. He reports that he was treated shamefully by the administrator. The administrator tried to prevent him from getting on the island, but after he reached it he was badly treated. He was given a dirty bed in the Chinese quarter, but preferred to sleep in the open air. He was refused a horse to ride over the island and was compelled to travel around on foot. Other petty annoyances were inflicted so as to make his stay unpleasant. He informs the court that the island is in a state of neglect and that there are about 100,000 sheep missing; also, that the cattle have not been properly cared for.”


August 7, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “Henry Miller and Henry Meacham, two of the bondsmen of John F. More, administrator of the estate of A. P. More, have served notice of withdrawal from the bond of the administrator. They were on the bond for $75,000.”


March 2, 1896 [SFCall]: “John F. More, a Santa Barbara rancher and brother of the late Alexander More, the millionaire owner of Santa Rosa Island, is registered at the Palace with his wife.”


March 27, 1896 [SFCall]: “The celebrated Santa Rosa Island case has assumed a new and sensational phase. It is charged that gross fraud was perpetrated by parties connected with the A. P. More estate. For several days past Messrs. Gunnison, Booth and Barnett and J. B. Mhoon have been taking depositions in the $50,000 suit brought against the estate of A. P. More by M. Watson, and many startling revelations have been made. In those depositions it is admitted by Watson and John P. More, brother of A. P. More, deceased, who owned Santa Rosa Island, that they went to his apartment in the Palace Hotel and took certain papers. Among those papers the attorneys say they have reason to believe is the last will of the island's owner. Said Mr. Mhoon: 'They admit abstracting certain papers, and it is more than probable a will was among them. When it is understood that A. P. More was supposed to have died intestate, and that his brother, J. F. More, secured letters of administration in the face of great opposition from fifteen of the heirs, this suspicion is given much color. The island includes 62,000 acres, several thousand head of sheep and extensive improvements. Its value is nearly $1,000,000. After A. P. More, the owner, was acquitted of the charge of murder for shooting a Chinaman in 1888, he went to Chicago and left the island in the hands of his brother, John F. More. The latter continued in the management and control of the property up to the time of his brother's death, when as administrator his executive authority was more exclusive. 'After securing letters of administration', continued Mr. Mhoon, 'John presented a claim for $100,000. He was granted about $60,000. While prosecuting his claim, Watson was his most important witness. And in turn More became Watson's chief reliance in his first suit for $30,000. The principal item in Watson's $30,000 claim was a charge of $18,000 for advice. He advised Mr. More not to sell a certain load of wool.' In the deposition taken by Messrs. Gunnison, Booth and Barnett yesterday, John F. More corroborated the statement of Watson concerning the taking of papers from A. P. More's rooms at the palace. 'It is a rank case of fraud,' said Mr. Barnett last night, 'and the evidence obtained in the depositions gives promise of great sensational developments in the near future. You see, there is $900,000 and a little Pacific principality at stake.”


May 12, 1896 [SFCall]: “The hearing of exceptions to the accounting of John F. More, the administrator of the Santa Rosa Island estate, began in Judge Coffey’s court yesterday morning. The heirs claim gross fraud and want his removal.”

May 12, 1896 [SFCall]: “A Petty Island King. John F. More is so called by his dead brother's heirs. Trying hard to depose him. The joint heirs demand an accounting for $85,000 and odd dollars. Sensational happenings are looked for in the estate of the late Alexander P. More. Mr. More was a sovereign in his own right and reigned supreme over the isle known as Santa Rosa. He had a brother named John F. More, who enjoyed his confidence to an almost unlimited degree. When Alexander More wanted to take a trip of two or three years for his health John F. ruled the little principality, and after Alexander's death John F. continued in authority by virtue of his appointment as administrator. That his administration of affairs has not been satisfactory to the other heirs of the deceased Alexander P. More is attested by the repeated efforts made to secure from him a complete accounting. But all attempts were apparently uncrowned by success, and the heirs finally determined to bring John up with a rapid legal turn. He filed what purported to be an accounting, and in Judge Coffey's court yesterday began the hearing of numerous exceptions on the part of the several heirs to the ingenious bookkeeping of the administrator. What may follow can only be hinted at, though it was openly stated by those interested that unless John F. makes a showing for $80,000 or $100,000 which the heirs think he has handled to their financial undoing, the court will be asked to remove him from his island sovereignty instanter. Attorney Mboon [?], representing two of the heirs, will file exceptions today governing the same points brought out by Messrs. Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett in behalf of their clients, also heirs of the deceased island king. The interests of the heirs are identical. They allege that John F. has rendered a false accounting and that he has appropriated $85,000 to his own use. In some of the papers to be filed this sum will be enlarged by the addition of moneys paid out for personal taxation from the funds of the estate. The heirs say More disposed of $30,000 worth of sheep, $1000 in cattle, $28,000 in products of the little principality, besides being in collusion with a man named Watson, to whom he is paying $125 a month to keep him company on the island and look wise when they both come to San Francisco to meet the heirs in the legal arena. Watson has a suit now pending against the estate for $30,000 for services rendered the deceased Alexander P. More. Among other modest charges is one of $18,000 for advice as to the state of the wool market. The heirs think postal cards were as cheap at that time as ever, and they would willingly have performed the same service for 2 cents and no commission. On the resumption of the case today additional exceptions to the strange accounting will come up for argument, and it may be three or four days before the hearing is brought to a close. After that, other measures will be adopted to dispose of and dispossess the island ruler.”


May 13, 1896 [SFCall]: “The hearing of exceptions to the administrator’s account in the Santa Rosa Island estate continues, and the heirs denounce John F. More in strong language.”


May 13, 1896 [SFCall]: “The hearing of the amended exceptions in the Santa Rosa Island case was continued before Judge Coffey yesterday. The additional exceptions filed by the heirs represented by Major Mhoon, as well as those presented by Messrs. Gunnison, Booth and Bartnett, show up in John F. More's administration of the island's affairs in detail. The heirs of Alexander P. More, who left his little principality in the hands of his brother, as administrator, are determined to get the facts and something like $85,000 or $100,000. The heirs say he received $14,000 from the Western Meat Company and failed to render an accounting thereof; next on the list is $500 received from the California Iron and Wrecking Company, for supplies furnished from the island, including shoes, tobacco, meat, etc., and following this sale of goods not belonging to him, are others of a similar character, wherein certain laborers, occasionally visiting the island, left $750 with Mr. More. He also, it is alleged, failed to account for $800 in rents, and did not turn over to the estate $10,000 due as rent from himself under the lease entered into with his deceased brother. Next on the list is an item of $1056 for freight on his own wool, claimed to have been paid out of the funds of the estate. It is also recounted in the newly filed papers that John F. More failed to turn over to the estate the 40,000 sheep entrusted to him, and that the number was 15,000 short, and further that he shipped 6000 head of sheep from the island at a time when he knew the total number on the island, including those shipped, did not exceed 32,000. The heirs think it is highly improbable that John F. More will be able to account for the discrepancies enumerated and they are determined to rid the island of themselves of his official domination as administrator.”


May 30, 1896 [SFCall]: “Judge Coffey rendered a decision last night holding John F. More, administrator of the estate of the late A. P. More, owner of Santa Rosa Island, accountable for $60,000.”


June 1, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “A telegram to C. E. Sherman from C. A. Storke, now in San Francisco, reads: ‘Court charges $60,000 to John F. More. Sustains your charges fully.’ Over a year ago Sherman made an accounting of property, including cattle and sheep on Santa Rosa Island, in the interests of the estate of the late A. P. More, and his report was very unfavorable to John F. More, the administrator of the estate. The case has been before Superior Judge Coffee of San Francisco for some time, with the above result.”


June 2, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “John More, superintendent of Santa Rosa Island, was suspended today. His successor will be appointed Thursday.”


June 12, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “City Attorney Thomas McNulta has returned from San Francisco where he was retained the past month as an attorney for the defense in the now famous A. P. More estate case. His side of the case naturally differs somewhat from the prosecution, and up to the present time his client, John F. More seems to have the worst of the legal squabble…”


June 27, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “Mrs. Miller, administratrix of the A. P. More estate, has notified John F. More’s attorneys that they are willing for the special committee to proceed with the investigation and accounting for property on Santa Rosa Island. The members of that committee have not said when they will go to the island, but it is supposed they will go in a day or two. It is said that at present there are no accommodations for them on the island, there being nearly one hundred men over there engaged in sheep-shearing and other work. Nothing authentic has been received by John F. More’s attorneys from the Superior Court of San Francisco, but it is inferred from the above statement that their request for an accounting has been granted and that an adjustment of differences may be reached without further litigation.”


July 11, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “On her last trip to the islands the schooner Restless had a distressing experience. The gaff broke and the mainsail gave way. The crew had a hard time making their destination. Mrs. Miller says there was something more than pleasure in her trip as administratrix of the A. P. More estate. Two suits have been brought against J. F. More individually for wages by Vicente Valenzuela and Frank Ybarra for work during the time he was acting as administrator. Papers were filed this morning.”


August 5, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The case of the removal of J. F. more as administrator of the estate of the late A. P. More, is set for August 12 at San Francisco. Mrs. Miller, the newly appointed administratrix, and her attorney, C. A. Storke, are already there.”


September 24, 1896 [SFCall]: “Judge Coffey yesterday removed John F. More from his position as administrator of the estate of A. P. More, and incidentally remarked that the ex-administrator has been guilty, among other misdeeds, of embezzling $12,000 belonging to the estate. A. P. More was a wealthy owner of livestock, and died October 23, 1893, leaving no will. On February 24, 1894, John F. More was appointed administrator of his estate, part of which consisted of 1500 head of cattle and 40,000 sheep at pasture on Santa Rosa Island. John F. More continued in complete charge of the affairs of the immense property until a few months ago, when Mrs. Eliza Miller, one of the heirs at law of the deceased, became convinced that all was not as it should be, and made application to have More ousted. He was temporarily suspended by Judge Coffey and Mrs. Miller granted special letters of administration. As a result of the investigation which followed, Judge Coffey made the order filed yesterday. His Honor says, in part: ‘I find that between October 1, 1895 and January 1, 1896, John F. More embezzled from the funds trusted to him $12,000. During the period named he sold a number of cattle to the Western Meat Company, from which concern he received over $14,000, $12,000 of which he has failed to account for.’ When the estate was turned over to Mr. More, there were on Santa Rosa Island 40,000 sheep and 1500 head of cattle. A commissioner sent to investigate has reported that there are now on the island 25,389 sheep. Mr. More reported to this court that the full number was there, when he knew there were less than 31,000 on hand. ‘A lot of abalone shells, etc., have also been sold and the proceeds appropriated by the administrator. The land has also been depastured by stock belonging to John F. More personally.’ Judge Coffey further recites how Mr. More has time and again failed to be present in court when cited to appear and how other judicial orders have been disregarded, and concludes by ordering his removal from the administrationship. Mrs. Eliza Miller is appointed in More’s stead, and proceedings to recover the missing funds will probably be at once instituted.”


October 20, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “C. A. Storke has returned from San Francisco where he spent the past few weeks on business relating to the More estate. It is learned that the motion made by the former executive, John F. More, for a new accounting of the stock on Santa Rosa Island was denied by the court and the citation against Mr. More for contempt was continued until the property shall be delivered.”


February 13, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “Witnesses in the case of Fred Forbush vs. John F. More told in the Superior Court this morning how they had worked for over a year without any wages when in the employ of John F. More, the subsequently disposed administrator of the A. P. More estate, and manager of Santa Rosa Island. Two island ranch hands testified this morning, and the case was then continued until March. Felipe Santiago Quintero and his grandson, Frank Edwards, assigned their claims to the plaintiff in this action. Edwards claims to have worked on the island from April, 1895 until June 1, 1896, when Mr. More was succeeded by Mrs. Miller as special administratrix without receiving a cent of payment. Thought the amount involved in the suit is not large, there is considerable interest shown, and several attorneys are engaged. What Mr. More’s defense will be is not learned, as he was not present today, and it was on this account that further hearing was postponed.”


November 13, 1897 [SBMP]: “When John F. More was administrator of the estate of A. P. More, deceased, he engaged several laborers on Santa Rosa Island; the men were unable to collect their wages and assigned their claim to Fred Forbush who brought suit against John F. More and recovered judgment for the full amount in the Santa Barbara courts.”


December 20, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “John F. More, Jr… arrived on the steamer yesterday afternoon. They all have been attending the University of California, and are home for their vacation.”


December 2, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “An agreement has at last been reached between John F. More and the other heirs to the estate of A. P. More, most of which is in this county, for a compromise of all subjects in controversy. In the agreement John F. More conveys all his interest in the estate to the heirs in full satisfaction of all claims of the estate against him. If the compromises be approved by Judge Coffee of San Francisco, the litigation in the estate, which has been pending for five years, will soon come to an end.”

1888 The New Directory of the City of Santa Barbara lists John F. More as a capitalist living at 131 East Arrellaga Street. The City Directory of Santa Barbara, 1895-6, lists John F. More as a farmer with his residence at 131 Arrellaga Street. This was his retirement house in town at the corner of State and Arrellaga streets.


May 14, 1889 [SBMP]: “Captain Thompson of the schooner Santa Rosa returned from the islands yesterday, having left John and Lawrence More with their brother. A. P. More is still very ill from the results of his beating at the hands of the shearers and could not be moved.”


June 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning, bringing over A. P. More, John More and family. Miss Alice Colt and Samuel Colt, who have been spending a couple of weeks on the island. Nothing was known on the island of the loss of a sailor from the sloop Liberty on June 15th, and he had not been washed ashore there. This disposed of the last chance of his safety and Ybarra was undoubtedly drowned.”


October 18, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island with a crew of Chinamen who have been engaged in securing a cargo of abalone shells. Mr. John More will return on the boat.”


September 3, 1892 [SBMP]: “The steamer Bonita stopped at the wharf yesterday and took J. F. More and Dave Culver, the wharfinger of Goleta, aboard. The passengers were taken to Santa Rosa Island.”


September 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday with J. F. More.”


April 8, 1910 [SBMP]: “John F. More returned Wednesday from a visit to Santa Rosa Island, which formerly belonged to the More estate. He made the trip in the Santa Rosa Island schooner.”


April 19, 1919 [SBMP]: “John F. More of Goleta passed away at 12:20 o’clock this morning at Cottage Hospital following an operation. Because of his advanced age, he would have been 80 years old in August...”


April 20, 1919 [SBMP]: “Funeral services for the late John F. More, pioneer of Santa Barbara County, will be held this afternoon at 3 o’clock from his late residence, 131 E. Arrellaga Street. Dr. Charles E. Deuel, rector of Trinity Episcopal church, will officiate.”


April 28, 1919 [SBDNI]: “The funeral of John F. More, pioneer of Santa Barbara County, will take place Tuesday afternoon from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Austin, 131 East Arrellaga Street... Mr. More was born in Medina County, Ohio August 19, 1839, and was one of 12 children his father, Peter Alexander More, being a member of a family that for many generations been distinguished in the annals of Scotland. Among them being Sir Thomas More… [John F.] and his three brothers acquired land in Northern California and later in this area. The beautiful More ranch in Goleta is the old homestead which he brought to a high state of development. It is noted as one of the most beautifully located properties in the county, and is rated as the finest walnut and bean ranch in that section in point of production. Since Mr. More took great pride in his property, each year saw additional improvements... Mr. More was married to Miss Miriam Hickox of Ohio, before coming to California, and she, with their three children, survive him, they being Mrs. Charles P. Austin, John F. More, Jr., and Miss Miriam More, the latter arriving from Boston…”