Ocean King

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Ocean King (#) (?-1892+), two-masted schooner brought to Santa Barbara in 1882 by Captain Andres Larco. In 1884 she was sold to Barclay Hazard who hired Charles Franklin Libbey as her captain. Ocean King was a prominent Santa Barbara vessel for a decade, her movements of regular interest and published in local papers frequently. In 1893 Ocean King was sold to O. S. Brooks.



In the News~

March 16, 1882 [SBDP]: “Larco arrived in port last night with his new sloop, the Ocean King, to be used for his fishing trade in the channel and among the islands.”


June 4, 1882 [LAT]: “Sailed. The sloop Ocean King, Larco, Santa Barbara; cargo of coal oil.”


July 12, 1882 [LAT]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, returned on Saturday evening from San Miguel Island with a cargo of eleven barrels of seal oil, two and a half tons of seal skins, and fifteen other skins.”


June 22, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Larco has returned with his sloop Ocean King from a pleasure tour to the Islands and San Pedro. He was gone about two weeks, having a party of Ventura excursionists with him… Captain Larco brought about four tons of grain from Hueneme to Santa Barbara for the brewery here.”


July 3, 1883 [SBDP]: “Messrs. Doulton and Larco, whose return from a cruise among the islands in Santa Barbara channel was mentioned yesterday, related their experiences while running from a frolicsome old California gray which had taken quite a fancy to the little sloop, Ocean King. Last Tuesday morning while beating up before the wind between Gaviota and San Miguel Island, the boat received a sudden shock from below which made her tremble, and a moment afterwards the back and then the flukes of a large whale appeared alongside the boat and then disappeared. A moment afterwards the monster appeared upon the other side of the sloop as it rose to the surface, struck the surface of the waves with its flukes, and then went down. Messrs. Larco and Doulton were in hopes that the sea monster had gone its way and left them, but a minute afterwards it reappeared running alongside the little sloop, its back out of the water...”


July 7, 1883 [LAT]: “Island curiosities. The Santa Barbara Press says that the sloop Ocean King, Captain A. Larco, returned to that port last Sunday after a week’s trip to the northern islands. The vessel had on a cargo of twenty-one barrels of seal oil and two tons of seal skins consigned to the Rogers Brothers by the fishers on the islands. Mr. Josiah Doulton, the court reporter, and his son, Les, accompanied Captain Larco on this trip. While at the islands they gathered a large assortment of curiosities. One of them is a petrification of a small tree which is very perfect. Some queer relics of wrecks and the old aboriginal residents were picked up. The scene on Flea Island off the island of San Miguel, as described by Mr. Doulton, must be peculiar. The acres of eggs reported some weeks ago, are now about hatched out. The guano on the island appears all alive with young marine birds. So thick are they that it is difficult to walk without treading in the nests. The voyage was pleasant as well as profitable. A large supply of fine rock cod was brought home.”


July 9, 1883 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, returned on Saturday evening from San Miguel Island with a cargo of eleven barrels of seal oil, two and a half tons of seal skins, and fifteen otter skins.”


July 12, 1883 [LAT]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, returned on Saturday evening from San Miguel Island with a cargo of eleven barrels of seal oil, two and a half tons of seal skins, and fifteen other skins.” [Santa Barbara Press]


July 13, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Larco has again returned from the islands with his sloop Ocean King.”


July 14, 1883 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, sailed for Ventura today chartered for a load of freight.”


July 18, 1883 [SBDP]: “Last Friday evening Captain Larco of the sloop Ocean King received a telegram from Ventura summoning him to that port to take on a cargo. On arriving there he found that the cargo was a party of merry pleasure seekers dead bent on having a good time on the water...”


July 21, 1883 [SBWP]: “Last Friday evening Captain Larco of the sloop Ocean King received a telegram from Ventura summoning him to that port to take on a cargo. On arriving there on Sunday, he found that the cargo was a party of merry pleasure seekers dead bent on having a good time on the water...”


July 26, 1883 [SBDP]: “A gay festive party of the elite of Spanish society went out trolling on the Ocean King this afternoon.”


July 31, 1883 [SBDP]: “The staunch little sloop, Ocean King, Captain A. Larco, sailed from Santa Barbara last Saturday afternoon about half past two o’clock with a select party intent upon viewing the many attractions of the islands which divide the Santa Barbara channel from the main ocean. This party included district attorney Boyce, Mr. Josiah Doulton, the Court stenographer, F. P. Kelley, of the Arlington, Mr. Fred Lateward, of the U.S.Coast Survey, Mr. Hosterman, editor of the Independent, C. Whitehead, editor of the Press, F. H. Seely of Goleta, three little boys and the Doctor, the last mentioned maintaining a strict incognito from the beginning to the close of the trip. There was a fine fresh breeze blowing when the Ocean King started and as it was in our favor the run was made across the channel...”


July 31, 1883 [SBDI]: “Last Saturday afternoon the Ocean King, Captain Larco in command, cast off from Stearn’s Wharf with perhaps the jolliest party that ever occupied her comfortable quarters on board. Everything had been put in the best of condition for a cruise among the islands by the most accommodating captain and his crew… In about three hours after setting sail, the vessel anchored within Scorpion Harbor on Santa Cruz Island…”


August 1, 1883 [SBDP]: “Further adventures of the Santa Barbara exploring party... There is the rock upon which the Panama and San Francisco passenger steamer, Winfield Scott, struck and went to pieces in 1853 said Captain Larco as he pointed towards the worst looking rock and reef to be seen near the island. The Ocean King was brought-to and made fast to a bunch of kelp and Larco kindly rowed a skiff containing the news-hunter and a friend to look at the wreck...”


August 1, 1883 [SBDI]: “On the first of September Larco expects to make a five days cruising excursion for the islands, with a party not to exceed ten. The Ocean King will be well provisioned for the trip. Larco’s rates for taking out a party of this kind are $10 per day. All the islands will be visited on this excursion and anchor cast at all the various points of interest…”


August 8, 1883 [SBDI]: “Messrs. W. N. Cowles, Dr. Chas. Anderson, Col. J. R. Anderson, H. H. Force and M. M. Small of the Arlington make up a jolly crew who are today trolling for barracuda off the Ocean King, Captain Larco commanding…”


August 8, 1883 [SBDP]: “A distinguished party of fishers, including Col. J. R. Anderson, Doctor Charles Anderson, M. M. Small, H. H. Force and Manager Cowles started out with Captain Larco on the Ocean King this morning for the islands. They will have a joyful time.”


August 9, 1883 [SBDP]: “The pleasure party from the Arlington which went forth with Captain Larco yesterday on the Ocean King for a day’s fishing have not returned this afternoon. It is surmised that they have gone to Anacapa to see the old wreck.”


August 11, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King sailed this morning for the islands touching at More’s Landing to take on a party of pleasure seekers from Goleta.”


August 13, 1883 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King returned this morning after two days' cruise. Captain Larco landed the slickest cargo of pleasure seekers at More's Landing that ever went forth on the briny. Ten stalwart Grangers of Goleta, and all sick. No fun in the party.”


August 29, 1883 [SBDP]: “Captain Larco’s sloop, the Ocean King, left this morning at 10 o’clock with a pleasure party, for Santa Cruz Island where they will remain a few days.”


September 3, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King arrived with the pleasure party from Santa Cruz Island, last Saturday evening.”


September 3, 1883 [SBDP]: “An excursion to Lady Harbor. A newly discovered haven on Santa Cruz Island. ...Our party consisted of six including Captain Larco. After a delightful sail of about four hours in the Ocean King sloop, we reached Santa Cruz Island, anchoring in a small inlet about ten miles from the west end...‘Captain why do you call this Lady Harbor?’ such was the question put by your correspondent to Captain Larco on arriving at one of the most beautiful little harbors in the world. ‘Because,’ said the genial light-hearted Italian fisherman in his quaint and expressive way, ‘so nice, quiet, pretty, wind N.E., S.E., N.W., S.W., no move, like floor in your house, on board Ocean King here, sleep all the time you want, perfectly still’...And if I may be allowed to advertise Captain Larco and his trim sloop the Ocean King, I would say, if any of your readers want a change of the healthful kind, engage Captain Larco to take you to Lady Harbor in his sloop.”


September 3, 1883 [SBDI]: “Lady Harbor. Last Wednesday evening the sloop Ocean King sailed from Santa Barbara with a select party of excursionists bound for the Island of Santa Cruz. Captain Larco had spoken enthusiastically of the beauties of a snug little cove upon the north west side of the island and to which he had given the name of Lady Harbor…”


September 6, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Larco sailed this morning in the Ocean King for Ventura to take an excursion party to the islands.”


September 15, 1883 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, came in from San Miguel Island today.”


September 29, 1883 [SBDP]: “Captain Larco’s favorite sloop, the Ocean King, will leave for the islands next Monday.”


October 6, 1883 [SBDI]: “Santa Barbara nearly lost its city attorney the other day during the gale which swept over this region. Mr. Thomas NcNulta went out with Captain Andres Larco to the islands in the staunch little sloop Ocean King. While endeavoring to beat around the west end of Santa Cruz Island a squall struck them and Larco was at the helm and a boy was forward when the sloop was nearly thrown upon its helm ends by the gale. The boy was unable to cast off and let go canvas quick enough and Larco was then obliged to go to his assistance, leaving attorney McNulta at the helm. It was the most exciting moment of his legal gentleman’s life, but he was equal to the emergency. He kept the vessel trimmed until Larco had let go all the canvas and had returned to the helm just in time to save the sloop from going over, for McNulta was obeying orders and was sending the sloop straight ahead into the tough of the sea, which was mountain high. McNulta reports having a splendid time on the cruise and can now talk sailor’s lingo with the best Jack Tar afloat.”


November 9, 1883 [SBDI]: “The beautiful lines of the Ocean King will be missed from the waters of the channel for awhile as Captain Larco has taken it to More’s Landing to be renovated.”


November 16, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Andrea Larco goes to San Miguel today in the Ocean King taking out a cargo of supplies.”


November 20, 1883 [SBDI]: “H. M. Fears, of Santa Clara, returned yesterday from a trip to the islands on Ocean King and is again at the Occidental.”


November 20, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Andreas Larco brought the schooner Ocean King from San Miguel Island yesterday.”


November 21, 1883 [SBDI]: “Captain Larco left on the Ocean King this morning for San Miguel Island to bring over a load of otter skins for Rogers Bros.”


December 14, 1883 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, brought in a load of fresh fish from Santa Cruz Island last night.”


December 24, 1883 [SBDI]: “Capt. Andrea Larco has performed a singular feat. He is well known already as a fisher and skillful handler of the seine, but he has outdone himself in having, during his last voyage in the Ocean King, caught a fine seal in his net. This he dispatched with a club and without even scratching the handsome skin…”


December 28, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Ocean King, Captain Andrea Larco, arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of seal oil and seal skins.”


January 2, 1884 [SBDI]: “A party of gentlemen of Santa Barbara left yesterday with Captain A. L. Larco of the Ocean King, for the islands. They will probably return today.”


January 4, 1884 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King has returned from Santa Cruz Island with a party of excursionists.”


January 4, 1884 [SBDI]: “A life on the ocean waves in the snug little Ocean King… The snug little craft, the Ocean King, lies ready at all times to carry parties safely back and forth, and Captain Andrea Larco, the skillful navigator and typical Italian fisherman, a thorough son of the sea, is a jolly commander…”


January 7, 1884 [SBDI]: “A trip to the islands in the Ocean King is the thing during this fine weather.”


January 17, 1884 [SBDI]: “Larco is arranging for another island trip. His gallant little schooner, Ocean King, grows in favor.”


January 21, 1884 [SBDI]: “Across the channel in the Ocean King…The Ocean King, managed by Captain Larco, an experienced mariner whose exploits would have made a less modest man famous the world over, went splashing through the waters as light as a gull...”


January 21, 1884 [SBDP]: “Mr. W. N. Cowles, the manager of the Arlington, accompanied by Messrs. F. S. Hinkle, E. R. Dimond, W. W. Burton and A. C. Wilson sailed for Santa Cruz Island last Thursday on Captain Larco’s schooner, Ocean King, on a pleasure-seeking expedition. The gentlemen give a glowing account of their trip...”


January 26, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Ocean King, Captain Larco, has been fitted up with eight comfortable berths, four on either side. This will be appreciated by pleasure parties who visit the islands in the vessel.”


January 28, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King went to Santa Cruz Saturday morning for fish.”


February 9, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King sailed for Santa Cruz Island for fish Friday and will be gone a few days.”


February 11, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King has arrived from the islands. During the late storm while Captain Larco had his vessel at Santa Cruz Island, the force of the gale parted his anchor and chain in the bottom of the sea.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, set sail for San Miguel Island yesterday morning, having on board Dr. H. Mills, wife and child, and Captain Ellis of the wrecked Convoy, as passengers. Dr. Mills with his family intends to live on the island, and will set up a comfortable home, having taken with him a quantity of household furniture and paraphernalia...”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and the Star of Freedom, and sloop Ocean King are still at the islands.”


February 21, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Larco, arrived from San Miguel Island about 1:30 this morning with fresh fish. Captain Ellis, who went over on the sloop to look after the wreck of the Convoy, says that they were unable to get anywhere near it, on account of prevailing wind.”


February 21, 1884 [SBDI]: “Captain Ellis, who went in the Ocean King to the scene of the wreck of the Convoy to endeavor to recover property left on the island, has returned. Owing to the waves it was impossible to get within a mile of shore.”


February 25, 1884 [SBDP]: The Ocean King sailed today for Anacapa Island, taking to the mainland the balance of the crew of the wrecked Convoy.”


March 1, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King brought in yesterday a cargo of fresh fish.”


March 3, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King set sail for the islands on Saturday.”


March 7, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King brought in yesterday a cargo of fresh fish.”


March 10, 1884 [SBDI]: “Semi-occasionally the Islands across the channel are called upon to supply sea lions for some of the many menageries about the country. The last order comes from Woodward’s Gardens, San Francisco, to Rogers Brothers, for several live sea lions, and this morning the Ocean King started out to bring over strange islanders. This business of supplying live animals for menageries is in keeping with the other queer industries for which Santa Barbara is famous. As the seals will be on the wharf in cages, awaiting transfer by steamer, visitors will have a chance to see the awkward, yet musical amphibian monsters and listen to their plaintiff wail.”


March 12, 1884 [SBDI]: “Owing to the roughness of the water at the islands, Captain Larco could not secure the sea lions for which he started out in the Ocean King a day or two ago. He returned to Santa Barbara yesterday afternoon and left for another attempt today.”


March 14, 1884 [SBDI]: “The report that the Ocean King has foundered among the breakers is entirely without foundation. Captain Larco is not that kind of a mariner.”


April 6, 1884 [SBI]: “A review of Santa Barbara shipping...The Ocean King is the little schooner best known to all residents and visitors alike. The jolly commander, Captain Larco, has made it a favorite pleasure boat and its duties are multifarious. Captain Larco is a fisherman and the Ocean King has first duty as a fishing smack, but nothing comes amiss, a pleasure party to the islands, taking over a party of otter hunters and their traps, taking Chinese abalone fishers or any kind of passengers, carrying provisions to, or abalones, shells, skins, dried fish, fresh fish. In fact anything from the islands, such is the work of the Ocean King…”


April 7, 1884 [SBDI]: “The undersigned, being compelled to leave for Italy to see his mother, who is quite sick, takes this opportunity to express his respect and appreciation of the kind people of this city and thanks for the liberal patronage bestowed upon him. I offer for sale my well-known sloop, the Ocean King, at a fair price. I leave my family in Santa Barbara, and hope to return to this mild and lovely climate as soon as circumstances will permit. Andrea Larco.”


April 9, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived in port from the islands at 9 o’clock last night.”


April 12, 1884 [SBWI]: “The Ocean King is the little schooner best known to visitors. The jolly commander, Captain Larco, has made it a favorite pleasure boat, and its duties are multifarious... The Ocean King has a first duty as a fishing smack, but nothing comes amiss, a pleasure party to the islands, taking over a party of otter hunters and their traps, taking Chinese abalone fishers or any kind of passengers, carrying provisions to, or abalones, shells, skins, dried fish, fresh fish, in fact anything from the islands.”


April 15, 1884 [SBDI]: “It is reported that that popular schooner, the Ocean King, has been sold by Captain Larco to Mr. Hazard of this city, who will use it for a passenger vessel.”


April 21, 1884 [SBBP]: “The staunch, sea-worthy and fast-sailing sloop, Ocean King, is now prepared to accommodate excursions, fishing and sailing parties, to carry freight to and from any of the islands, and to undertake any other business that may offer. For terms and other particulars apply at the house of Captain A. Larco, or on board the sloop, to Charles F. Libbey, Master. Santa Barbara, April 21st, 1884.”


April 22, 1884 [SBDP]: “Having disposed of the Ocean King I hereby bespeak for Mr. Charles F. Libbey, who has taken command, a continuance of the patronage hitherto bestowed upon me; and I further desire to recommend him to my friends, and to the public in general, as a careful and competent seaman, well-acquainted with the navigation of the Santa Barbara channel and islands, and as a courteous and obliging man. (Signed) A. Larco. The staunch, seaworthy, and fast-sailing Ocean King is now prepared to accommodate excursions, fishing and sailing parties, to carry freight to and from any of the islands, and to undertake any other business that may offer. For terms and other particulars apply at the house of Captain A. Larco, or on board the sloop, to Charles F. Libbey, Master.”


April 22, 1884 [SBDP]: “Excursion parties to the islands will be the fashion this year even more than last. The staunch little vessel Ocean King bids fair to be in constant requisition, and under the new and efficient management of Mr. Libbey, will prove even more conducive to the pleasure of merry parties than ever before…”


April 23, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King sails for San Nicolas Island this afternoon or tomorrow for another load of sheep. Her sailing has been delayed on account of an accident to Captain Libbey in which he cut off the end of a little finger while splitting wood. The disabled member is healing nicely, however.”


April 25, 1884 [SBDI]: “Captain Libbey, of the Ocean King, is still suffering from the accidental wounding of his finger. Amputation may be necessary.”


April 25, 1884 [SBDI]: “The staunch, sea-worthy and fast-sailing sloop, Ocean King, is now prepared to accommodate excursions, fishing and sailing parties, to carry freight to and from any of the Islands, and to undertake any other business that may offer. For terms and other particulars, apply at the house of Captain A. Larco, or on board the sloop to Chas. F. Libbey, Master.”


April 26, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Ocean King today take from twenty to thirty sheep shearers to the islands.”


April 28, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King sailed this morning for San Miguel, with a portion of a seal hunting party sent out by Mr. Henry Dally. The balance of the party will be taken over to the island in a couple of weeks, when active warfare will be waged against the seals, for their hides and oil.”


May 5, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Angel Dolly and the schooner Ocean King came in yesterday from San Miguel Island. The Ocean King takes a load of Chinese abalone gatherers to Santa Cruz Island.”


May 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa, and the sloop Ocean King are all lying at the wharf.”


May 22, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Angel Dolly and Ocean King were in port today.”


July 24, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King, Captain Libbey, arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of seal oil and skins.”


July 31, 1884 [SBDI]: “A Chinese junk founders on a reef near San Nicolas. We learn from Captain Libbey, who arrived in the harbor this morning with his sloop, the Ocean King, with several tons of abalone shells, the miraculous escape of the crew of a Chinese junk that left San Diego a few days ago for the purpose of securing a cargo of abalone shells for the San Francisco market. While lying at anchor on the evening of the 25th inst., a westerly gale sprang up, and not withstanding the fact that the vessel had two anchors out she drifted upon a reef that at high tide is not noticeable. On board, all was still up to the time she struck the rocks, and her pounding course woke the occupants. The vessel was a total wreck… Captain Libbey, who had been aroused by the noise of the boat in going over the reef, being lifted and lowered by the action of the swells of the ocean, hove in sight and rescued the men from their perilous position and landed them safely in Santa Barbara. The crew consisted of eight men, and the only thing on board that was saved was a bag of rice and a coil of rope. The boat was of about 35-tons register and uninsured. From the description of the boat it is supposed to be the one that was launched in this city [Santa Barbara] some two years ago by the Chinamen…”


September 3, 1884 [SBDI]: “The party that chartered the Ocean King yesterday for fishing purposes succeeded in catching 250 pounds of fish. If any of our piscatorials from abroad can beat this, let’s hear from them.”


September 19, 1884 [SBDI]: “Col. Whittington chartered the Ocean King yesterday and took a number of his friends out on a fishing tour. The party caught several fine specimens of yellowtail and a good time was generally indulged in.”


October 9, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King left yesterday for the islands on an otter hunt.”


October 13, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King is in port, having arrived yesterday with nine seals.”


October 17, 1884 [SBDI]: “Herbert Rogers is fitting out the Ocean King today with provisions for his men who are engaged on the different islands in the channel in capturing seals.”


October 18, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop, Ocean King, arrived Saturday night from Anacapa Island with twelve sea lions, which will be shipped to San Francisco on the Santa Rosa tomorrow night.”


October 21, 1884 [SBDI]: “The sloop, Ocean King, has returned from the islands, where she has been distributing provisions to seal hunters.”


November 19, 1884 [SBDI]:Ocean King left for the islands yesterday.”


November 28, 1884 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King was alongside the wharf today, taking on fishing paraphernalia and provisions for Larco, who is going to Gaviota to establish a fishing station. The prime object is the catching of crawfish for the San Francisco market, the Santa Barbara channel being the only place where this epicurean luxury is procured. Lompoc will also be supplied with fresh fish from this station.”


November 28, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King chartered by Larco, sailed for Gaviota this morning on a crawfish expedition.”


December 15, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King arrived in port Saturday forenoon from Santa Cruz Island, with shells and skins for H. A. Rogers, gathered by the Field brothers.”


December 15, 1884 [SBDI]: “Combat between a 14-year-old boy and a shark… Larco the fisherman has a 14-year-old son that manages a fishing smack with as much dexterity as an old tar that had followed the seas all the days of his life, and last summer a year ago when his father owned the sloop Ocean King, would always accompany him on sea voyages… Yesterday morning the boy jumped into one of his father’s boats, bent on a fishing tour, and before he got outside the kelp he hooked on to a ten-foot shark that brought his boat to a standstill… The boy’s exertions were finally crowned a success, for when the huge monster was within reach of the lad he struck him a severe blow with a large knife…”


December 16, 1884 [SBDI]:Ocean King is being fitted out with provisions for the fishermen on the islands.”


December 31, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King arrived in the harbor this morning from San Pedro, where she has been undergoing a coat of paint.”


January 14, 1885 [SBDI]:Ocean King has returned from a fishing cruise.”


January 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King went to San Nicolas Island day before yesterday for shells and abalones.”


January 19, 1885 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King has arrived from San Nicolas Island with a cargo of abalone shells.”


January 22, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King is the only vessel in the harbor at present.”


February 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King yesterday took on a lot of freight for Dr. Howard Mills, destined for San Miguel Island. Dr. Mills and his wife will go over to the island when the schooner sails.”


February 12, 1885 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King, that left the wharf a few days ago in search of a party that went out from Ventura some two weeks ago, (not having been heard from there was some fear of their having been drowned,) returned yesterday. The party in question was found anchored near Anacapa Island, all well and having a good time.”


February 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King arrived last night from San Miguel Island, where she went to take Dr. Mills and family. The sloop brought back a few seal skins and abalones.”


February 19, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King went over to the islands yesterday for a number of live seals to fill a contract in San Francisco.”


February 23, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came into port Saturday night from the islands.”


February 23, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King has arrived, but no otter.”


February 24, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King sailed for Anacapa Island this morning to get a cargo of shells and abalones.”


February 27, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came into port this morning from Anacapa Island, bringing a cargo of abalones and shells for Chinese shippers.”


March 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King came in from Anacapa Island Saturday afternoon with a quantity of wool and forty head of sheep from Mr. Elliott’s Anacapa and San Nicolas bands for I. K. Fisher.”


April 1, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came into port yesterday with wool, and a number of sheep, from San Nicolas Island.”


April 20, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King was today loaded with supplies and ready to sail for San Miguel and Flea Island with Henry Dally and a party of seal hunters.”


April 22, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King left this morning for the Islands in search of seals. The sloop endeavored to make the trip yesterday, but owing to the unfavorable winds had to return.”


April 27, 1885 [SBDI]: “A Chinese junk is laying in our harbor, the property of Sing Chung the merchant. She is from San Diego and we are credibly informed that the white fishermen made it very unpleasant for the Mongolian fisherman, and the junk in the future will ply the waters near Santa Cruz Island. The fish they catch is dried and forwarded to China.”


May 1, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King is provisioned, and as soon as a wind springs up will set sail for San Nicolas Island, with a number of Chinese abalone hunters.”


May 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The little schooner Angel Dolly, for so long a time owned in Santa Barbara, has been playing an important role as rescuer of the crew of the Ocean King which was burned at sea on the 8th instant. She took off from the burning vessel 25 men.”


May 22, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King is taking on supplies preparatory to a trip to Flea Island, on the other side of San Miguel Island, with Henry Dally and a party of seal hunters.”


May 22, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King is taking on supplies preparatory to a trip to Flea Island, on the other side of San Miguel Island, with Henry Dally and a party of seal hunters.”


June 11, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King is undergoing repairs.”


July 3, 1885 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King, arrived from San Miguel Island this morning with several tons of abalone shells.”


July 14, 1885 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King left this morning for the islands.”


July 16, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King arrived last evening from the islands with a cargo of oil. The traffic in the oil, fish and shell trade has been larger for the past year that it has ever been known before, and the revenue derived from the above amounts to thousands of dollars.”


July 29, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King sailed for St. Nicholas Island for a load of sheep.”


August 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Charles Libbey, arrived in port Saturday night from the islands with 35 sacks of dried abalone and 35 sacks of shells.”


August 17, 1885 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived yesterday from San Miguel Island with a cargo of abalones.”


September 1, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King returned from Santa Rosa Island yesterday with a cargo of abalones.”


September 2, 1885 [SBDP]: “The gathering and curing of abalones is an important item of business here, the product finding a market chiefly among the Chinese, who ship large quantities of the tough yet nourishing flesh to the Flowery Kingdom. The sloop Ocean King night before last brought a cargo of 120 sacks of abalone to this port from Santa Cruz Island, each bag weighing 75 to 80 pounds, and making a total weight of about five tons. The market price of the shells is so low just now that they are left at the island until there is a demand for them.”


September 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “A rare occurrence, it is noted that every vessel of the Channel fleet was in port this morning: the schooners Santa Rosa, Star of Freedom, Rosita, Angel Dolly, the sloop Ocean King, and numberless fishing smacks and pleasure, sail and row boats. The fleet made a pretty picture, dotting the water in every direction from the wharf.”


September 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King yesterday brought over from San Nicolas Island forty five sacks of abalones.”


October 6, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a party of mining prospectors, who will investigate the reported find of a silver mine on the island recently.”


October 10, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King, which took a party of mining prospectors to Santa Cruz Island a few days ago, is in port.”


October 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “The vessels in port this morning were the Star of Freedom, Ocean King, Rosita, Pirate and a Chinese junk.”


October 27, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came in from San Miguel Island this morning.”


November 4, 1885 [SNDP]: “The Ocean King took a party of Chinese abalone hunters to San Nicolas Island yesterday.”


November 18, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King, Sun Lee and Annie Larsen are the only vessels at anchor in the harbor. The fishing boats have been hauled up on the beach.”


December 1, 1885 [SBDP]: “The sloop Ocean King was to sail for San Miguel Island today with a cargo of grain and provisions for Mr. H. W. Mills.”


March 17, 1886 [SBDP]: “Of the channel fleet, Angel Dolly, a Chinese junk, the Annie, and Ocean King were the only vessels in port today.”


June 7, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King has gone to Flea Island with supplies for the Dally sealing party.”


June 12, 1886 [SBDI]:Ocean King left this morning for the islands.”


June 22, 1886 [SBDI]: “Clark Streator goes to San Miguel Island Saturday [aboard Ocean King] to be gone a month. During his stay he will devote his time to collecting curios as well as rare birds and marine animals. The island is said to be alive with foxes and they roam with perfect security, sure of being unmolested.”


June 25, 1886 [SBDI]: “The bald eagles on San Miguel are very destructive to sheep and lambs. A party leaves tomorrow on the Ocean King to interview them with guns. They will be absent from the city one month.”


July 2, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King arrived day before yesterday from Dally’s camp on Flea Island with fifteen barrels of oil and three hundred seal skins.”


July 2, 1886 [SBDI]: “The sloops Brisk and the Ocean King have arrived from the islands with cargoes of oil and skins.”


July 14, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King is off on an abalone trip down the coast.”


July 20, 1886 [SBDI]:Ocean King discharged yesterday 60 sacks of abalone shells and this morning left for San Miguel Island to bring over some whalers.”


July 24, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King made the round trip to San Miguel Island including stoppage of two hours at the above place, in 36 hours, which we consider good time.”


July 30, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King is off down the coasts after a cargo of abalone.”


August 2, 1886 [SBDI]: “The water birds of San Miguel Island by Clark P. Streator. Situated about sixty miles west of Santa Barbara is the island of San Miguel which lies farthest west of the Santa Barbara group. The island is owned by Mr. W. H. Mills of San Francisco, and through the kindness of the gentleman I was permitted to go there to make a collection of birds that frequent the locality. We left Santa Barbara on the Ocean King and after a fair wind we reached the island in about twenty-four hours…”


August 3, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King returned from below yesterday with a cargo of abalones.”


August 14, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came in yesterday from Anacapa Island with a load of Chinese abalone hunters.”


August 18, 1886 [SBDI]: “W. H. Mills is in the city and tomorrow will leave for San Miguel Island on the sloop Ocean King.”


August 19, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King sailed for San Miguel Island yesterday with Mr. Mills aboard.”


August 19, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King touched at Gaviota yesterday to land a sea-sick man who had contracted to work for Mr. Mills on San Miguel Island. Becoming deathly sick he insisted on being landed and walked all the way from Gaviota to this city.”


August 23, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came in to port last evening with Mr. Mills, from San Miguel Island.”


August 25, 1886 [SBDI]: “Professor Greene, the biologist, and W. H. Mills, left this morning on the sloop Ocean King for San Miguel.”


August 25, 1886 [SBDP]: “The waterfront reporter sends in the following: the Ocean King started this morning for San Miguel... A very heavy wind has been blowing at the islands for several days—so heavy, in fact, that the Ocean King could not reach San Miguel a few days ago, but returned to this port...”


September 3, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King has gone to San Miguel Island for Chinese freight.”


September 3, 1886 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King and the Brisk indulged in a short race a few days ago, the former coming out ahead.”


September 4, 1886 [SBDI]:Ocean King arrived last night about dusk, from the islands.”


September 6, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King arrived in port Friday with Mr. B. Hazard, the owner of the vessel, and a party of pleasure seekers.”


September 8, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King came in this morning from San Miguel Island, with Mr. Mills and party.”


September 8, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King has gone to San Miguel for Chinese freight.”


September 13, 1886 [SBDP]: “Sloop Ocean King arrived in port Saturday evening with a large cargo of abalone.”


October 2, 1886 [SBDP]: “The crafts in port this forenoon were the Angel Dolly, Alice, Ocean King and a Chinese junk.”


October 16, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Ocean King arrived from San Nicolas Island today with a cargo of wool—this season’s clip.”


October 16, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King arrived this morning, two days out from San Nicolas Island with 60 sacks of wool for Mr. Elliott. Clark Streator, who came over on the boat, says the adverse winds delayed them several hours.”


October 22, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King yesterday brought to the mainland another cargo of Anacapa Island wool.”


January 19, 1887 [?]: “The sloop Ocean King, Captain Charles Libbey, arrived in port Saturday night with thirty sacks of dried abalones and thirty-five sacks of shell.”


June 21, 1887 [SBDP]: “The Ocean King made a flying trip from Anacapa Island yesterday, coming over in four hours and a half. While at the island, Otalo Espinosa caught a small seal which he brought back with him, and if it lives will endeavor to tame it.”


July 12, 1887 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King has been newly repainted, and she looms up amazingly well. She was discharging wood this morning that she brought over from one of the islands.”


July 14, 1887 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King left for one of the islands early this morning.”


In 1888, Ocean King was used by Captain Waters and his San Miguel Island ventures to bring mail, supplies, family and guests to the island. In her island diary, Mrs. Waters refers to Ocean King several times:

February 17, 1888: “The schooner [Ocean King] came in to anchor in the harbor today, bringing mail and Mr. Mills and his friend, Mr. Nichols from Siskiyou County. » Waters, Minnie Mrs. Waters’ Diary of her life on San Miguel Island January 1-June 27, 1888 Pp. 4-51 in Santa Cruz Island Foundation Occasional Paper Number 4, Santa Barbara, California, 1990.


February 20, 1888: “The wind blew so that Mr. Nichols did not dare to go out on such a small boat as the Ocean King, so they remained another day [on San Miguel Island].” » Waters, Minnie Mrs. Waters’ Diary of her life on San Miguel Island January 1-June 27, 1888 Pp. 4-51 in Santa Cruz Island Foundation Occasional Paper Number 4, Santa Barbara, California, 1990.


April 3, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King yesterday brought over 31 sacks of wool from San Nicolas Island for Elliott & Son.”


April 14, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived from San Miguel Island this morning with twenty-three bales of wool for Waters & Nichols.”


April 15, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King, arrived night before last from San Miguel Island with 23 bales of wool. She discharged her cargo yesterday and will leave tomorrow with some provisions for the same island and will return with another cargo of wool.”


April 18, 1888 [SBDI]: “The Ocean King brought thirty-three bales of wool from San Miguel Island and has gone back for another cargo.”


April 21, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King, arrived night before last from San Miguel Island with a cargo of wool.”


April 23, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King took a number of Chinamen over to San Miguel Island today. They went after abalones.”


April 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King left yesterday morning for San Nicolas Island.”


April 30, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived from the islands this morning.”


May 2, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King left this morning for Anacapa Island with a camping party on board.”


May 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King left yesterday morning for Anacapa Island.”


May 6, 1888 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the sloop Ocean King, Captain Charles Libbey, arrived from Anacapa Island with E. Elliot, the owner of the island, and F. N. Dancaster, who had been over there on a short pleasure trip...”


May 7, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King came over from the islands on Saturday.”


May 8, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King, left yesterday morning for San Miguel Island.”


May 9, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King, left yesterday morning for San Miguel Island.”


May 11, 1888 [LAT]: “Yesterday morning the sloop Ocean King, Captain Charles Libbey, arrived from Anacapa Island with E. Elliott, the owner of the island, and F. N. Dancaster, who had been over there on a short pleasure trip… The party brought back with them many different varieties of rare flowers and ferns, some abalones, a large number of sea gull eggs, and many other knick-knacks too numerous to mention. Mr. Elliott also brought over a sample of some alfalfa, 40 acres of which is in full bloom on the island… Charles Libbey, the master of the boat, accompanied the gentlemen about the island and greatly assisted them in finding and discovering some of the many hidden beauties and treasures of the island.”


May 18, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived from the islands yesterday with a load of fish.”


June 7, 1888 [SBDI]: “The sloop Ocean King left for Flea Island today with a party of sealers on board.”


June 8, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King is loaded with barrels and kettles and a camping outfit for a party that is going over to Flea Island on a sealing expedition.”


July 28, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King arrived yesterday morning from Anacapa Island with eight barrels of oil and one ton of seal skins,”


August 16, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King has gone to the islands after a number of Chinamen who have been there getting abalones.”


September 26, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King sailed yesterday morning for San Nicolas Island.”


October 1, 1886 [SBDI]: “Monday, Mr. Elliott will leave for San Nicolas and Anacapa Island with some sheep shearers. He is to charter the Ocean King for the occasion.”


October 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The sloop Ocean King sailed for San Miguel Island yesterday morning.”


July 2, 1892 [SBMP]: “The old Ocean King, the wrecked boat on the beach between the wharf and bath house, which has for many seasons been the prey of hundreds of artists, amateur and otherwise, has been moved some little distance in order to clear the way for the boulevard.”


September 10, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The old landmark, Ocean King, a schooner that has lain for years on the beach, is being refitted and painted and will be used for a fishing boat.”


September 24, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Mr. Brooks has fixed up the ancient Ocean King, which has furnished a subject for the artists for several years, and will take it from the present dry dock on the beach and use it as a fishing boat.”


December 25, 1893 [SBDI]: “The mysterious absence of the sloop Ocean King as published in Saturday’s paper, is not yet cleared up. Some express hopes that the boat will be heard from at San Diego, but it is reported on quite good authority that she is not in that harbor. It is possible that the sloop is at Catalina or some little place this side of San Diego.”


December 27, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Over a month ago the sloop Ocean King sailed from this port for San Nicolas Island, where it was expected that she would touch and get an anchor which had been left there. Up to this date, nothing has been heard of her, and fears are expressed for her safety. The Ocean King was the old craft which lay on the beach here for years, and furnished a subject for artists and camera fiends during all that time. O. S. Brooks recently purchased her and remodeled the boat. She was launched, but old sailors expressed their doubts about her seaworthiness. Mr. Brooks and his son started out on board her, and it is thought possible they encountered a storm and were wrecked. The boat, however, may be in some southern port. A dispatch from San Diego says she is not there.”


December 30, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “A telegram from San Pedro announces that the Ocean King is at that port, and has not been lost, as feared. Captain Brooks and his son are on board. A constable left for there Wednesday afternoon with papers in a civil suit attaching the boat. Several creditors are after the Ocean King, and this may account for its somewhat mysterious movements.”


September 29, 1901 [SBMP]: “The old Ocean King, formerly Mr. Hazard's yacht here, came in yesterday from San Pedro. She is now in command of Captain James Wright, and is on her way to the crawfish camps of the islands. The Ocean King is well known here.”


In June of 1892, the Ocean King wrecked on the beach at Santa Barbara [?]. Seventy-five years later [1967] she had to be moved from the ocean bottom, as she was in the path of Santa Barbara's new sewage outfall. [Wheeler + Kallman p. 40]