PISULA, Gail Lynn

From WikiName
Jump to: navigation, search


PISULA, Gail Lynn (1955-1989) [SS#530-34-4510],



In the News~

April 21, 1989 [LAT]: “Residents in quiet Avalon said they were stunned Thursday by the news that one of their neighbors had been arrested on suspicion of killing his former girlfriend, in the city's first alleged murder in at least 40 years. Bruce Edward Kingman, 41, was flown from Avalon to Long Beach on Thursday afternoon and then driven to the Lakewood Sheriff's Station, where he was being held without bail for allegedly killing Gail Lynn Pissula [sic], 34. Some of Kingman's friends and co-workers said she was a former girlfriend of his who had recently returned to Avalon in search of work. 'Town Is Stunned' "Everybody is shook up about it," said Lolo Saldana, owner of the local barber shop. "The town is stunned." Paramedics received a call from Kingman about 4 a.m. Thursday and arrived at his trailer on Pebbly Road to find Pissula lying on the ground nearby, sheriff's deputies said. Kingman said Pissula came to his trailer and the two argued before she slipped and fell on a wooden patio, said Deputy Dan Cox. Kingman reportedly told deputies that he attempted to revive her but failed. Sheriff's officials declined to release other details or to say what led them to suspect Kingman of murder. Kingman and Pissula had known each other at least since 1986, when both worked in Two Harbors, at the opposite end of the island, friends said. For the past year, Kingman has managed Pebbly Beach Building Supply Co., a lumberyard just outside the center of Avalon, said Jack Fennie Jr., the owner of the business. Fennie described Kingman as an excellent employee who reorganized the lumberyard and made it more profitable. He lived alternately in a trailer behind the business and in a sailboat anchored not far offshore, Fennie said. Kingman and the dead woman had lived together until they broke up last summer and she moved to the mainland, Fennie said. But Pissula had returned recently to look for a summer job in Avalon, he said. Rare Crime. Don Haney, editor of the Catalina Islander newspaper, said the alleged killing had shocked the community. "But I don't think there is a concern that the island has changed," he said. "Not many things like this happen." John Windle, who served as constable on the island for 22 years, said there has not been a killing that led to a murder conviction on Catalina in at least 40 years. One woman shot an intruder in her home in the early 1960s and was convicted of involuntary manslaughter, said Fern Whelan, clerk of the Catalina Justice Court.”


July, 1989 [LAT]: “The manager of an Avalon lumberyard has been ordered to stand trial in the murder of his former girlfriend, the first murder on Santa Catalina Island in more than 40 years. Bruce Edward Kingman, 41, will be arraigned July 14 in Long Beach Superior Court in the beating death of Gail Lynn Pissula, 34, on April 20. Catalina Justice Court Judge Peter Mirich ordered the trial Friday after hearing testimony from three sheriff's investigators and from a friend of the dead woman. The investigators told Mirich that Kingman gave them varying accounts of his alleged conflict with Pissula, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Glenn Sommers. Kingman allegedly admitted that he had argued with Pissula on the night she died. But after first telling investigators that on the night she was killed he did not let Pissula into the trailer where the couple lived, he later said that he let her in and only pushed her, Sommers said. Paramedics called to the trailer at about 4 a.m. said they found the woman's body on the ground outside. Detectives said they found blood inside the trailer. The Los Angeles County coroner's office later ruled that Pissula was killed by a blow to the back of the head. At Friday's preliminary hearing, a friend testified that she had previously seen Pissula with bumps and bruises after Pissula had been with Kingman, according to Sommers. The woman's death shocked the close-knit town of Avalon. Officials at Catalina Justice Court and the Avalon sheriff's station said they can't remember the last murder on the island. John Windle, who served for 22 years as the island's constable, said there has not been a murder on Catalina for at least 40 years. In the early 1960s, a local woman was convicted of involuntary manslaughter after shooting an intruder in her home, said Fern Whelan, clerk of the court. Kingman and Pissula had known each other since 1986, when both worked in Two Harbors near the west end of the island, friends said. Kingman later took a job as manager of Pebbly Beach Building Supply Co., a lumberyard just outside the center of Avalon, said Jack Fennie Jr., the owner of the business. Kingman helped reorganize the lumber business and made it more profitable, while living alternately in a trailer behind the lumberyard and aboard a sailboat anchored just offshore, Fennie said. Kingman and Pissula had lived together until they broke up a year ago and she moved to the mainland, acquaintances said. They said that she returned this spring to live with Kingman and to look for a job in Avalon.”


October 13, 1989 [LAT]: “A lumberyard manager from Avalon was convicted Thursday of murdering his girlfriend in Santa Catalina Island's first murder in more than 40 years. A Long Beach Superior Court jury deliberated for a day and a half before finding Bruce Kingman, 42, guilty of second-degree murder in the death of Gail Lynn Pisula, 34. Kingman, who had been free on $250,000 bail, was taken into custody immediately after the verdict. He faces 15 years to life in prison, when he returns to Judge Robert Parkin's court Oct. 26 for sentencing. "We are very elated," said Pisula's father, Tony, who sat through the two-week trial with his wife, Millie. "This doesn't bring my daughter back, but at least we feel that justice was done."”