Peor Es Nada

From WikiName
Jump to: navigation, search

Peor Es Nada (#) (1834-1835), Mexican schooner of twenty tons built at Monterey by José Joaquin, and launched August 30, 1834. Under the command of Charles Hubbard, she sailed for the south in October, under charter to Isaac Sparks of Santa Barbara and others for otter hunting. Peor es Nada was used in removing from San Nicolas Island the last Indians of the Channel Islands. She was wrecked the following year off Golden Gate, California. [Nidever: 107; Janssens: 43].


  • Peor es Nada owned by a Mr. Gomez ("A Spainard at Monterey") and Isaac Sparks
  • Captain Hubbard
  • Captain Isaac Williams ("who now owns the ranch called ‘Del Chino’ in Los Angeles" (1853); ["late Collector of the Port of San Pedro" (Sept. 19, 1799-Sept. 13, 1856)
  • Isaac Sparks
  • Louis T. Burton

"The Peor es Nada left Santa Barbara about the latter part of April, 1835. About three months after, she returned to San Pedro, and from there went directly to the Island of San Nicolas for the purpose of taking off the Indians then living there. Sparks, who hunted with me for several years afterwards, told me about removing the Indians, but I cannot now recollect who authorized or caused their removal. I remember distinctly, however, that a man named Williams, a former acquaintance of mine in the Rocky Mountains, was an interested party, as he assisted in their removal." [Nidever in Thompson & West, History of Santa Barbara County, California, 1883]



In the News~

[1835]: “I arrived on the coast in the year 1834, in the month of November. In the early part of the following year (1835), I came to Santa Barbara and engaged in otter hunting, which I have followed almost uninterruptedly until within a few years. At the beginning of 1835, Isaac J. Sparks and Luis T. Burton, Americans, also otter hunters, settled here, and chartered the schooner Peor es Nada (worse than nothing) for a trip to the lower coast. The schooner was commanded by Charles Hubbard, who was hired by the owner of the schooner, a Spaniard at Monterey. The crew placed in her by Sparks and Burton was, with to or three exceptions, composed of Kanakas. The Peor es Nada left Santa Barbara about the latter part of April, 1835. About three months after, she returned to San Pedro, and from there went directly to the Island of San Nicolas for the purpose of taking off the Indians then living there. Sparks, who hunted with me for several years afterwards, told about removing the Indians, but I cannot now recollect who authorized or caused their removal. I remember distinctly, however, that a man by the name of Williams, a former acquaintance of mine in the Rocky Mountains, was an interested party, as he assisted in their removal. I am under the impression that another man in Los Angeles took an active part in the affair…” Originally published in Thompson & West The History of Santa Barbara County, California (1883); [Statement of John Nidever (p. 162) in Heizer, R. F. & A. B. Elasser. Original Accounts of the Lone Woman of San Nicolas Island (121- ) in Aboriginal California: Three Studies in Culture, 1966.


October 28, 1853 [NYT]: “Santa Barbara, Thursday, September 15, 1853. Messrs Editors: … About the year 1824 or 1825, this island [San Nicolas] was visited by a Russian ship, and some dispute having arisen between the sailors and the Indians, about the women, the Russians killed all the men except two, and carried off the woman. About ten years afterwards, Mr. Williams (who now owns the ranch called ‘Del Chino’ in Los Angeles), with other Americans, had been in the habit of visiting the island, while hunting otters, which abound in those waters. At one of these visits he brought away with him a young Indian squaw. At this time there were about seventeen Indians living on the island. Shortly afterwards, Mr. Williams prevailed upon Mr. Hubbard, who was captain of a small schooner, owned co-jointly by Mr. Sparks, (now of Santa Barbara), and Mr. Gomez, of Monterey, to bring over all the Indians who remained. This was easily accomplished, as the Indians were desirous to remove…”


February 1857 [HCM]: “From this period little is known of the Indians remaining on these islands till the year 1836 when Captain Isaac Williams, late Collector of the Port of San Pedro, visited this island [San Nicolas Island] in a small vessel, and took on board all the Indians remaining but one woman, who was left in the manner stated by Captain Russell, in the California Magazine.”