Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island

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Prisoners' Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, 1869



Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island is the main port of entry located on the island’s north shore. It is the site of a former large Chumash village mapped as Nimilala by Alfred Kroeber. The name Prisoners’ Harbor is derived from an episode in February of 1830 when the ship Maria Ester, under the command of Captain Andrew Christian Holmes, was sent to offload prisoners in San Diego from Acapulco, Mexico. Not allowed to land in San Diego, the ship came to Santa Barbara in March 1830. A sergeant and twelve soldiers were in charge of the convicts, today thought to have numbered between 77 and 83. Some were left in Santa Barbara as servants, but most were left on Santa Cruz Island with a small supply of food and livestock to fend for themselves. According to several accounts, the men constructed rafts and returned to the mainland. Angustias de la Guerra Ord recounted in her memoirs, Occurrences in Hispanic California:

“Don Romauldo Pacheco thought of sending them [convicts] to one of the islands and did so with the greater part of them... He first provided seed for sowing and some animals such as cattle and a few horses... Those on the island, after being there some time, lost what they had by fire. We saw the flames from here [Santa Barbara]. A long time passed before succor could be sent to them because the schooner which was used to carry supplies to the island had not arrived. The convicts made some rafts and came here on them. Some landed at Carpinteria or the Rincon and were taken and confined in the guardhouse. Corporal punishment was ordered inflicted by rods or lashes — two or three were very badly treated. Later the Comandante was obliged to send for the rest. They all came to Santa Barbara and complaint was never made of them. Some were sent to Monterey.”

As a harbor, Prisoners’ affords shelter from all but northeast to northwest winds. This place name appears on the Santa Cruz Island Sheet C topographic map. Vessels wrecked at Prisoners’ Harbor include: Santa Cruz (schooner) (1960).


Photograph of Prisoners' Harbor, Santa Cruz Island in 1896



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In the News~

1852: A. D. Bache’s Report of the Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Survey for 1852 states:

“Prisoners’ Harbor is on the north side of the island, and near the middle of it; at this point there was some years ago a penal settlement, from which the name of the anchorage is derived. Wood and water can be procured here in abundance and with little trouble; the course and distance from this harbor to Santa Barbara is north by west by compass, and twenty-five miles.”


November 12, 1852 Deed Book A, page 72 of the Official Records of Santa Barbara County: Thomas Jefferys Quit Claim of a frame house at Prisoners’ Harbor to Charles Fernald:

“Thomas Jefferys to Charles Fernald: Known all men by those present, that I, Thomas Jeffries, of Santa Barbara in the State of California, in consideration of the sum of ten dollars, to one paid by Charles Fernald, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do hereby sell, remise, release and forever quit claim unto the said Charles Fernald, and unto his heirs and assigns, a certain frame house situated on the Island of Santa Cruz in the County of Santa Barbara, near the beach known as Prisoners’ Harbor, to have and to hold ...”


1853: James Box raised pigs on Santa Cruz Island as early as 1853.


December 25, 1852 [DAC]: “Charts of the Coast Survey. Mr. W. B. McMurtrie, the able draftsman of the Board of Coast Survey, and attached to the surveying steamer Active, at present in our waters, has furnished us with the recently finished charts of the surveying party on our shores. They are drawn by him and are engraved in the east in beautiful style on fine drawing paper. The sketches and charts before us are of Prisoners' Harbor, San Clemente Harbor and Cuyler’s Harbor…”


January 1, 1853 [TAC]: “Charts of the Coast Survey. Mr. W. B. McMurtrie, the able draftsman of the Board of Coast Survey, and attached to the surveying steamer Active, at present in our waters, has furnished us with the recently finished charts of the Surveying party on our shores. They are drawn by him and are engraved in the east in beautiful style on fine drawing paper. The sketches and charts before us are of Prisoners' Harbor, San Clemente Harbor and Cuyler’s Harbor, points on the coast situated in latitude and longitude as follows…”


January 22, 1859 [SDU]: “The body of Miguel Cota, the person drowned some three months since, in company with Peter Hammond, in the Santa Barbara Channel, has been found at Prisoners' Harbor, Santa Cruz Island; and Vicenti Panateri, the only one who escaped the sad catastrophe, has since died from the effects of exposure and over exertion at the time of the accident.”


May 1862 J. G. Cooper: “I learned from Dr. J. B. Shaw, that on Santa Cruz Island there are metamorphic, volcanic, and fossiliferous rocks, but could not learn whether the fossils were recent or not… In May 1862 I landed for some hours at Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, where I saw only metamorphosed sandstones…” [Cooper. Report of Explorations of the Islands off the Southern Coast of California, 1863, unpub. manuscript].


Wednesday, May 5, 1869 [SBP]: “Arrived. The schooner J. D. Sanborn, Captain Chase, arrived in port on Thursday last from San Francisco with a load of piles for the wharf at Santa Cruz Island. The schooner is owned by the new company that recently purchased the island. We hope the Sanborn may have a long and prosperous career.”


July 24, 1869 [SBPW]: “Twenty-five miles right opposite Santa Barbara, is to be, after this, an occasional stopping place of the steamers passing up and down. Since it has come into the possession of its present owners, T. Lemmen-Meyer & Co. of San Francisco, a wharf has been constructed on the northern or leeward side of the island, in a cove which makes in from a stream, and gives fine shelter from all winds but northers, to vessels to anchor. The wharf is 200 feet long, and at low tide there is 18 feet of water at the pier. The wharf is so constructed that on one side the cars take the bales of wool to the vessel, and on the other, cattle and sheep are driven to the steamer’s deck with perfect ease and safety. The island itself is some 25 miles long, and from 3 to 12 miles wide. It is used at present for nothing else but a sheep range, of which there are some 30,000 or more. Fine stock has been taken and will be kept there in addition. The products of the island are increasing so fast under the present management, that it has been found necessary to furnish steam transportation to market. Wild hogs are so numerous that they have become a great nuisance, and the owners of the island are willing that Lux & Miller or any other man should shoot them, butcher them, corral them, clean them out any way they please, free of charge. As there are many steep places thereabouts, what fun it would be for the Gaderene demons to hunt there a week.”


December 1, 1869 [SFDEB]: “Mackerel on the California Coast — opening for a new industry. Few persons are aware of the fact that mackerel of a good quality can be caught, in very large quantities, in the waters surrounding the islands of the Santa Barbara channel. There are four of these islands. They are San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz and Anacapa. Of these, Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa are the largest, containing about 5000 [sic] acres of land each. They are covered by Spanish grants. Anacapa and San Miguel are owned by the government. They have never been surveyed, and are open to settlement. Each of these four islands is about 20 miles from the mainland… The mackerel can be caught and are good at all seasons, but they are most abundant in the months of June, July, August and September. In 1868 Captain Matthew Furlong caught 100 barrels while lying at Prisoners’ Harbor, in the island of Santa Cruz…”


November 4, 1871 [SBT]: “Departures. October 29. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, Santa Cruz Island.”


November 4, 1871 [SBT]: “Arrivals. October 31. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island.”


January 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. January 2. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Prisoners’ Harbor.”


February 5, 1874 [LAH]: “...the Santa Cruz Island Company. The officers of this company are all naturalized citizens, including two Germans, two Spaniards, and one Frenchman. The buildings and improvements of all sorts located on five different points of the island, are valued at from $20,000 to $40,000, exclusive of steam tallow works erected two years ago at the expense of about $6,000. The wharf at Prisoners' Harbor, recently restored, has cost the company no less than $10,000...


August 6, 1874 [SBIW]: “Mackerel are now plenty near Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. This choice fish has been scarce for the past five years. Formerly it was very plentiful here, and caught by the schooner load. Those now caught are large and fat, and the most delicious eating.”


November 1, 1875-June 30, 1875 [Stehman Forney, Annual Report]: “At Prisoners' Harbor, there is a well of fresh water, but it is not so good as that in the pond, when not impregnated with salt. The improvements at Prisoners Harbor consist of a substantial wharf 515 feet in length, one dwelling house, extensive tanks for extracting tallow from the carcasses of sheep, this method is resorted to when there is no market for them, in order to dispose of the increase on the island, they generally kill from fifteen to twenty thousand sheep in one season’s operation.”


March 11, 1876 [SBDP]: “Shell-hunting on Santa Cruz Island. Placing ourselves in charge of Captain Thomas, on board the Star of Freedom, at 9 A.M. we sailed for the famed island of Santa Cruz… A commodious adobe house, though damp, cold and dusty from long vacancy, afforded us a sufficient shelter. The darkness of the hour compelled us to destroy some of the Chinese furniture in the house, such as soap boxes, barrels, etc., to provide ourselves with fuel… Our three day’s excursion was unavoidably extended to eight, and had it not been for the kindness of the captain of the Reliance, who put into the little harbor during a storm, and for the generous hospitality of the superintendent of the island, who kindly furnished us with supplies, our subsistence must have been procured from the abundance of sea gulls, frogs, and prickly-pears with which the island abounds… L. M. Cornell.”


August 5, 1876 [Santa Cruz Weekly Sentinel]: “The wharf at Prisoners Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, is sadly in need of repair. A number of piles have been cut in Blackburn Gulch for the intended repair.”


February 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “Captain Thomas of the Star of Freedom reports a terrific rain storm at Santa Cruz Island night before last. The creek running through the canyon became so flooded that it rose nearly ten feet higher than its usual depth, and went roaring down to the sea in a restless torrent. Huge rocks, weighing from two to three tons, were carried down from the canyon, and emptied into the ocean; fences and all other frail structures in its path were swept away; and an old Indian burial ground on the beach, said to be three hundred years old, was completely washed out so that not a vestige remains. The house in which the men lived was fortunately on sufficiently high ground to save it from destruction, but it was flooded with water and made untenable, forcing the occupants to seek another shelter. No material damage was done, however, and upon the water subsiding the men returned to their house. As the rainfall here was not unusually great, it is probable that Santa Cruz was visited by a friendly waterspout, that strove to make itself at home, if it had to turn everybody else out of doors to do it.”


April 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “Santa Cruz Island. Researches of a French savant in the island. Lecture of Mons. L. de Cessac, yesterday, before the Santa Barbara Society of Natural History. Mons. de Cessac excused himself from addressing the society in English, he having been only a few months in America… The mission intrusted to him by the French government had principally for its aim the study of the volcanic phenomena and the anthropology of the western coast of North America. The island of Santa Cruz and the neighboring islands of the California archipelago were the first course in his field of investigation… His present purpose was simply to entertain the society with his researched in Santa Cruz Island. The savant opened with a rough sketch of the island, indicating the geological formations… the Tertiary period in which are found numerous beds of silex (flint) and veins of chalcedony, etc., going towards the west, on the northern coast, as far as the neighborhood of Prisoners’ Harbor, and on the southern coast to within three miles of Los Coches Prietos…”


September 30, 1878 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the bay Saturday afternoon from Prisoners Harbor. Capt. Thomas reports a very heavy sea from five miles out, which swept his decks clean at every break. He will return tomorrow morning.”


October, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor this afternoon, two days and one night on the way. Captain Thomas reports no wind at all, and weather as hot as he ever saw it in the channel. The schooner brought over three passengers but no freight.”


October 5, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the bay yesterday afternoon about 4 o’clock from Prisoners’ Harbor bringing the shearers from Santa Cruz Island. She was 33 hours making the passage. No wind.”


October 8, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived at her anchorage from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon.”


October 10, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


October 12, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from Prisoners’ Harbor with Superintendent Joyaux in the cabin and six passengers in the steerage. She brought thirty bales of wool.”


October 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


January 11, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Prisoners’ Harbor with a load of dried fish.”


December 8, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom made the trip from Prisoners’ Harbor to this port on Saturday in 2 hours and 20 minutes. She sailed again for the island this morning.”


December 23, 1880 [SBDP]: “From Captain Burtis of the schooner Star of Freedom, who arrived in port last night from Santa Cruz Island, we learn that a large schooner, name not reported, loaded with wharf lumber bound to Wilmington from Puget Sound, has been laying in Prisoners’ Harbor for protection during the late storm...”


December 23, 1880 [SBDP]: “From Captain Burtis of the schooner Star of Freedom, who arrived in port last night from Santa Cruz Island, we learn that a large schooner, name not reported, loaded with wharf lumber bound to Wilmington from Puget Sound, has been laying in Prisoners’ Harbor for protection during the late storm...”


January 28, 1884 [SBDP]: “…All shipping in the harbor at the approach of the storm hastily left for Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island for greater safety, although the water is not so rough but that large craft can ride up to the wharf with perfect immunity from danger.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “On account of the prevailing sou’easter yesterday afternoon, the Santa Rosa made a run over to Prisoners’ Harbor. The Star of Freedom left this port for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island yesterday, with several Italian laborers and their families, who came down from San Francisco to go into service for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


Map #8, 1885 of the Santa Cruz Island Company shows a fisherman’s house and a gate with the notation: “to pass to and from the fishery park and depot.” The harbor was developed as the site of a large ranch complex. In 1887 a brick warehouse called the magazine was constructed at Prisoners’ Harbor for the storage of wine puncheons and wool bales awaiting shipment to the mainland. A small narrow gauge rail system with hand carts ran from the magazine to the end of the wharf.


January 5, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Clara Light of San Francisco, Captain Call, put into Prisoners’ Harbor, wind bound on December 30, sailed south on the 1st inst, on a whaling expedition.”


November 20, 1885 [SBDP]: “The steamer Santa Cruz came into port this morning from Prisoners’ Harbor where she has been for the last three days for safety from the last storm.”


July 21, 1886 [SBDP]: “Schooner Golden Gate, Captain Smunsun, started from Prisoners’ Harbor for Redwood last Wednesday. She left a load of lumber at the islands.”


August 28, 1886 [SBDP]: “The yacht Annie, having on board Messrs. Balch, Palfray and Flint, about whose continued absence at the islands some uneasiness has been felt, arrived safely in port at 6:30 this morning. The yacht left Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, day before yesterday, but was becalmed in the voyage across for nearly forty-eight hours, during which time they drifted down the coast to about off Rincon Point. They beat up from there this morning. The voyagers report having a splendid time, and are anxious to go again. They experienced some wind at the islands for three or four days, but not enough to give them any trouble. They caught plenty of fish and brought back as mementos of the trip a splendid starfish and the backbone of a shark, measuring twelve feet from head to tail, caught by themselves. Their friends in this city had become alarmed for their safety, and were going to dispatch a boat today to search for them.”


November 27, 1887 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


December 21, 1887 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left Sunday evening for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


April 18, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, left yesterday morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


April 26, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning.”


October 25, 1888 [SBMP]: “Having a standing invitation from Captain Larco to accompany him to the islands in his staunch little craft, the Genova, and after months of restless longing to avail myself of his kindness, the writer a few days since cast aside all business cases, donned his sea apparel, and stepped on board the gallant little craft, determined to have a good time with his genial old friend… We reached Santa Cruz Island about 11 A.M., and anchored in Prisoners’ Harbor, and after delivering the mail to the proper authorities left…”


July 7, 1890 [SBDI]: “The Santa Barbara Society of Natural History met at their rooms Saturday, June 28th, 1890. Mrs. A. A. Boyce in the chair… Among them, the new genus of Nudibranchiates discovered and named by Dr. Fewkes …Dr. Fewkes named the genus Cabrilla from Cabrillo, the famous Portuguese navigator who discovered our islands, and was buried upon one of them. The species was discovered attached to the anchor of a buoy in Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, and is named Cabrilla occidentalis. It is a soft slug-like animal somewhat resembling the sea hares (Aplysia)…”


June 29, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, yesterday.”


November 23, 1894 [SBMP]: “The steamer Coos Bay disabled at Santa Cruz Island. The steamer Santa Cruz arrived in port yesterday with six sailors and the 2nd mate of the steamer Coos Bay on board. They had been picked up in the channel while on their way to this city to report the breaking of the shaft on their steamer while making the wharf at Santa Cruz Island Wednesday night. On orders from the Pacific Steamship Company the Santa Cruz sailed for the island to take off the passengers which were later brought to this port. The disabled steamer will be towed to San Francisco by the Pomona tonight.”


March 20, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz from Prisoners’ Harbor is in port.”


July 20, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Genova returned today from the island, reporting the sloop Restless safe in Prisoners’ Harbor. The party was landed safely on the afternoon of Wednesday, and Captain Burtis started back for the mainland. About a mile and a half out from Cueva Valdez the mast gave way under the heavy wind that was blowing, and with the sail fell over the side... The Restless worked her way to Prisoners’ Harbor about 15 miles distant, and Captain Burtis was busy making repairs.”


September 4, 1895 [LAH]: “Santa Barbara, September 3. Much interest is manifested over the announcement of Mr. Justinian Caire’s intention to build a large hotel and a number of cottages on Santa Cruz Island. The proposed improvements will be made at Prisoners’ Harbor, and it is quite probable that the buildings will be of stone. Messrs. Raymond and Whitcomb, lessees of the San Marcos, and Mr. Caire have reached an agreement by which both hotels will be conducted on similar lines, providing for interchange of guests.”


November 9, 1895 [SBMP]: “The steam yacht Eleanor sailed yesterday for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, but was expected to return last evening.”


June 14, 1898 [SBMP]: “A party in the Olita took a sixty-five-mile cruise Sunday in the channel, going first to Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, and returning home in the evening. George W. Gourley was in command of the yacht.”


July 19, 1900 [SBMP]: “The yacht Tramontana returned yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island, the party reporting a very delightful cruise. They visited Prisoners’ Harbor, and every courtesy was shown them by the manager of the island. They made excursions on horseback to various parts of the ranch, and in every way had a most enjoyable time.”


July 3, 1902 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday.”


July 18, 1903 [SBMP]: “Island excursion on steamer Ramona. Beautiful new vessel leaves Stearn’s Wharf at 9 o'clock. Returns at 6. A most happy ending of the first week's program provided by the mid-summer tournament committee will be the excursion to Santa Cruz Island on the steamship Ramona, one of the staunchest and best equipped of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company's fleet... Arrangements have been made to land at Prisoners’ Harbor, one of the safest and most beautiful on the island. The passengers will land there... It is expected that the limit of 500 passengers will have been reached... Tickets $1.50.”


'December 8, 1903 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz' sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor this morning with the mail and a stock of supplies for the people on Santa Cruz Island.”


August 25, 1904 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner sailed yesterday afternoon for the islands after a stay of several days in this port. She took over passengers and supplies and was destined for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


September 8, 1904 [NYT]: “The island of Santa Cruz, next to Anacapa on the west, has an extinct crater showing a lava flow into Prisoners’ Harbor. But there has been no volcanic activity there in recent times.”


May 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “Sheep shearers return. The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain James Prescott, came in from Prisoners’ Harbor at 1 o’clock yesterday afternoon and discharged a crew of 20 sheep shearers, who have been employed on the island for several weeks. The boat also brought over 120 sheep for Sherman’s meat markets, and unloaded several barrels of wine for the local trade.”


June 20, 1905 [SBMP]: “Gem of island is Santa Cruz... Mr. Lowe was piloted to the various points of interest on the island of Santa Cruz by Captain Merry of the Vishnu, the trip across the channel being made last Saturday and the entire day of Sunday being given to the examination of the various points of greater interest... The mountains back of Pelican Bay and Prisoners’ Harbor are densely covered by the forests, some of the trees being immense...”


July 9, 1905 [SBMP]: “The lumber steamer Pasadena recently loaded a cargo of sheep at Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island for Eureka, Humboldt County. The lumber vessels bringing the product of the northern mills to the southern ports usually return under ballast, and the shipment of sheep in such large quantities from the Santa Barbara island is quite out of the ordinary.”


August 22, 1905 [SBMP]: “Captain Merry took a party of 21 people to the islands on Sunday in his yacht Vishnu. They visited Chinese Harbor, Prisoners’ Harbor and Friar’s Harbor and had a very pleasant trip.”


October 7, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steamer Pasadena put into port late yesterday afternoon and took on a cargo of stock, mostly horses, consigned to Santa Cruz Island. The Pasadena came south a few days ago from Eureka with a cargo of lumber for San Pedro, and is now on her return trip to the northern port. She has carried other cargoes for the Santa Cruz Island Company. After unloading the stock at Prisoners’ Harbor, she will sail on north without returning to this port.”


October 26, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz in charge of Captain Prescott, sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor on that island yesterday morning with a cargo of supplies, mail and expresses for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


November 14, 1905 [SBMP]: “Manager Arthur Caire of the Santa Cruz Island Company has returned from his island ranch with a party of friends, having been brought across the channel in the Santa Cruz Island steam schooner, which was in charge of Captain James Prescott. The schooner returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday.”


November 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning after unloading a string of cattle at this port for Sherman & Ealand. The cattle were thrown overboard and forced to swim ashore.”


December 7, 1905 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of supplies and horses for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


December 31, 1905 [SBMP]: “Thacher School party has novel vacation. Christmas week spent at the picturesque island resort... Captain Merry returned yesterday in his power launch Vishnu from Santa Cruz Island with a party of professors and students from the Thacher School of Nordhoff, who had been camping on the islands for a week. Members of the party report some very thrilling experiences on water and on land, but say that the holiday was one of the most interesting and enjoyable they had ever spent... Messrs.W. L. Thacher, Lawrence Sperry, Dana and Starr left Ventura on Saturday and had a very pleasant voyage in the Vishnu to Prisoners’ Harbor. Through courtesies extended to them by Mr. Caire, manager of the island, they occupied the fine store house at Prisoners’ Harbor. The party killed nine wild boat, the tusks of which were taken to Nordhoff as trophies of the hunt...”


January 25, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz is in port with another cargo of native wine which is grown and pressed on Santa Cruz Island. The schooner will soon return to Prisoners’ Harbor with supplies.”


February 13, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in port yesterday and after a short stay, during which mail and supplies were secured for the island ranch, she sailed back to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


April 12, 1906 [SBMP]: “Pleasure craft of large size may ply between this city and the Channel Islands. Two prominent business men at the Potter hotel yesterday were discussing the need of better transportation between this city and Santa Cruz Island, and their conference may lead to a first-class passenger steamer being built and put on runs across the channel during the summer... It was mutually agreed, between this port and Prisoners’ Harbor, was much needed and would be a paying proposition for anyone who was willing to put money into the scheme...”


April 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday after supplies for the men now employed on this island by the Caire Company. She will return today or Monday.”


May 13, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz has sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor after being in this port for several days. She carried a large amount of supplies for the Santa Cruz Island ranch men.”


May 16, 1906 [SBI]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz, which has been in port from Santa Cruz Island for the past three days, securing supplies, sailed today for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


May 17, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which has been in port for the past few days, left this afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, with supplies. She will return on Saturday of this week with between 200 and 300 head of sheep for the State Street market. Charles Ealand left on the boat for the purpose of selecting the sheep.”


June 7, 1906 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a gang of men for the island ranches. A number of the employees of the island company recently quit to go to San Francisco, attracted by stories of high wages.”


June 10, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came into port yesterday afternoon from Prisoners’ Harbor in charge of Captain James Prescott. She carried 140 sheep for William Sherman’s market, and a cargo of wine for the local trade.”


June 20, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner brought over 179 head of sheep from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman's meat market. The boat will return to Prisoners’ Harbor tomorrow.”


June 24, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with over 100 head of sheep. Large numbers of sheep have been brought from Santa Cruz Island this month for Sherman’s meat market. The pasturage on the island this year has been very good and the sheep are in fine condition.”


June 28, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon with 250 head of sheep for William Ealand of this city...”


June 28, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, Captain Prescott in charge, with 250 head of sheep for William Ealand of this city, will sail for Prisoners’ Harbor tomorrow morning, and will take on another cargo of sheep for the local market and for shipment to Los Angeles. Captain Prescott stated today that it was expected that the schooner would be back to the mainland again early Friday morning. The boat will continue to make trips across the channel until all of the sheep that Mr. Ealand recently purchased from the island company shall have been delivered.”


July 1, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday with a cargo of sheep.”


July 9, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island last Saturday afternoon with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand of this city, is still in the harbor. She will probably sail for Prisoners’ Harbor later this afternoon.”


July 11, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor a few days ago with a cargo of sheep for William Ealand of this city, will sail for the island late this afternoon, in charge of Captain Prescott, and will return with another load of sheep within a few days. Today the schooner was taking on a quantity of supplies for the various camps on the island.”


July 12, 1906 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners Harbor yesterday. The Santa Cruz has been in port several days.”


July 21, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner is expected in port this morning with a cargo of native wine and live sheep. Wine and sheep are being brought over as fast as they can be loaded at Prisoners’ Harbor. The wine is sent north to San Francisco...”


July 28, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning and was in port by 4 o'clock with a cargo of wine and sheep.”


August 25, 1906 [SBI]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island today with a cargo of sheep for the Ealand Packing Company of this city. It is expected that she will return to Prisoners’ Harbor tomorrow, after taking on supplies for the island camps.”


August 29, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a cargo of sheep for the Ealand Packing Company, was preparing to return to Prisoners’ Harbor this afternoon. Today she took on fifty puncheons of 175 gallons capacity each, which had been returned from San Francisco, to which point they had been shipped filled with wine.”


September 4, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz is expected to arrive from Santa Cruz Island late this afternoon or tomorrow morning with another cargo of sheep. She will also bring several puncheons of wine from the island warehouse. Supplies for the island camps will be taken to Prisoners’ Harbor on the return trip.”


September 5, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, which was expected to have arrived at this port from Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, a couple of days ago with a cargo of sheep, has not yet put in an appearance. By those who are particularly interested in the arrival of the boat it is believed that the failure of the schooner to arrive here on stated time has been due to difficulties in loading the boat on the other side of the channel.”


September 13, 1906 [SBI]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz, which arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor several days ago, is still at anchor in the channel near the commercial wharf. It is expected that she will set sail for the island tomorrow, carrying supplies for the island tomorrow, carrying supplies for the island camps.”


September 27, 1906 [SBI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last evening from Santa Cruz Island, bringing a number of head of cattle from Prisoners’ Harbor. She will remain in port for a couple of days, taking on supplies for the island camps.”


September 28, 1906 [SBI]: “The Santa Cruz, which arrived yesterday with cattle from Santa Cruz Island, is still in port. She is taking on supplies for the island camps and will probably be able to take her departure for Prisoners’ Harbor at some time tomorrow.”


December 15, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island at an early hour yesterday morning, bringing with her a quantity of wine. As soon as she can take on supplies, the schooner will return to Prisoners’ Harbor. It was the intention of Captain Prescott to return to the mainland early in the week, but the storm rendered it unsafe to attempt the trip across the channel.”


January 15, 1907 [SBMP]: “Channel Island of Santa Cruz a place of rare beauty… Prisoners’ Harbor is the principal anchorage on the north coast… A spacious building of adobe, sparingly whitened, stands securely in the very heart of its gardens, the windows surrounded by balconies and with green iron balustrades, and its red flowers closed in with the same bars against a straggling sheep. Quaint fireplaces and cabinets were one time here, and long silk curtains asway in the windows today are sighing with rich memories of other years. Brass candlesticks and an old telescope and a leaden chest on the tiled floor have the tales…”


January 17, 1907 [SBMP]: “Crawfish Camps Get Relief. Yacht Vishnu successfully lands supplies. Reports from islands indicate much damage… The three mile road from the wharf at Prisoners’ Harbor to the winery and the ranch houses was washed out. This road had been made at considerable expense in an apparently substantial way. However, stone culverts and heavy bridges were carried away in short order by the miniature cloudburst that the islanders were treated to…”


January 22, 1907 [SBMP]: “The power yacht Vishnu returned from Santa Cruz Island where a party of prominent eastern people were entertained for a day or two... Quava [Cueva] Valdez was inspected and various of the pretty harbors were visited. At Prisoners’ Harbor, the party occupied the ranch house, on the invitation of Mr. Caire. They were also invited by the company to visit the winery.”


February 19, 1907 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Irene reached Santa Barbara yesterday morning from Prisoners’ Harbor with a load of crawfish. Captain Nidever reports the crustaceans very plentiful. The Vishnu, Captain Merry, was also in from Santa Cruz, bringing mail from Forney’s Cove.”


April 13, 1907 [SBMP]: “The auxiliary schooner Santa Cruz reached this port from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday, with Captain James B. Prescott aboard. This is the vessel's first visit since she was damaged in the southeast gale in January last. On that occasion it will be remembered she was towed to port by the torpedo destroyer, Paul Jones, and it was found she had sustained some $800 in damage. She went down to San Pedro to be repaired, and has now returned to resume regular trips to the island.”


May 1, 1907 [SBMP]: “The launch Peerless, Captain Vasquez, arrived yesterday from Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, bringing over Joe Ruiz, whose ankle was broken by a horse falling with him while chasing wild sheep.”


November 1, 1907 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, with Captain George Nidever in command, started yesterday morning on her second trip of the season, to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


August 28, 1908 [SBI]: “Fourteen priests of the Catholic church, attached to the diocese of Los Angeles, returned this morning from Santa Cruz Island in the power schooner belonging to the Santa Cruz Island Company. For one week the clergymen have been guests of the company at Prisoners’ Harbor, where they have camped out and roughed it.”


January 9, 1909 [SBMP]: “Crawfishermen use rifles in defense of their traps. Wounded man brought here says ‘accident.’ According to Captain Gilbert of the power schooner Baltic which arrived here from Santa Cruz Island, there has been considerable trouble among the crawfishermen of the islands for some days, and shooting scrapes have been reported. He brought over two wounded men, one with a bullet that entered his cheek and passed out the back of his neck, and the other, Julius Valdez, slipped on a rock, it was stated, and so hurt himself. The man with the bullet wound was attended by a local physician. ‘Valdez slipped and fell on a rock,’ said Captain Gilbert last night, ‘and when we arrived at his camp where he was in company with Frank Nidever and Ira Eaton, we had to take him aboard and bring him here for medical treatment.’ He is at his home. There has been a good deal of stealing from the traps of the crawfishermen, and the latter are guarding their traps with weapons. It is dangerous for any one to approach these camps from the water, for fear of being shot. ‘We went into the camp of Clarence Levy [Libbey] and Charles Hansen on Tuesday, and Levy [Libbey] fired at us with a rifle as we sailed in. He said it was merely a salute, but the bullets flew mighty close. When we got to Prisoners’ Harbor, we found a man with a bullet wound in his cheek, the bullet having come out of the back of his neck. He said he shot himself, but I don’t know whether this was right or not. He was a fellow named Bill, and I think his last name was Johnson.’ He was attended by a doctor here. He was a partner of Joe Warnell, and after he was shot, Warnell went over to the camp of Joe Morales and the two got into a skiff and went to Prisoners’ Harbor. As they approached the shore, they say, they were fired at by some Italian fishermen on shore, who used rifles. The bullets struck the boat. They continued on to the shore, however, and made arrangements for bringing over the wounded man. We got there on Wednesday, took the wounded man on board, and started for home. The weather there was pretty bad and the sea ran high, but we had to come over with those two fellows, and so we ran for it. There are about forty camps on the island of from one to three men each, and they are all armed.”


January 9, 1909 [SBI]: “Wounded fisherman vanishes. Shooting accident, say friends. Man with bullet in neck disappears when he comes ashore. While cleaning a .38 caliber revolver in his fishing shack on Santa Cruz Island Thursday night, Claude Petersen, a crawfisherman, was accidentally shot through the upper right cheek, the bullet ploughing through his jaw and coming out at the back of his neck. Peterson, who was a partner of Joe Morales, walked over to the camp of Joe Warnell, where he was cared for, and Warnell and Morales, in a skiff, rowed 15 miles to Prisoners’ Harbor in hope of securing medical aid for the injured man. As the two men in the skiff approached the shore, Jack Carmenie, an Italian crawfisherman who lives at that point on the island, fired two or three shots at the skiff, thinking they were crawfish robbers in the act of stealing his traps. None of the bullets came anywhere near the boat…”


February 14, 1909 [SBMP]: “Charles Tetzen of San Francisco, the largest wholesale dealer in shells and abalone meat on the coast, made a trip out in one of the vessels to Prisoners’ Harbor for the purpose of doing business with different camps on the north and west side of the islands...”


May 16, 1909 [SBMP]: “R. H. Morris, a photographer of this city, left on the Santa Cruz Island boat yesterday to spend a week at the island taking pictures of the Company. Mr. Morris will make his headquarters at the ranch house near Prisoners’ Harbor and from there he will tramp over the hill and up and down the coast taking pictures as his fancy directs. The Santa Cruz Island Company for whom he is going is desirous of having views of the ranch house, the vineyard, and the sheep-shearing scenes and the herds of cattle. He will also get pictures of Lady’s Harbor, the Painted Cave, the Arch Rock, and many other beauty spots on the island.”


1909 (summer): One day Mr. Rogers went down to Prisoners’ Harbor [from Dick’s] in the morning and ordered five gallons of Riesling, for which the island was famous. [Diary of a Sea Captain’s Wife, p. 128]


August 14, 1909 [SBI]: “Fred F. Caire, of San Francisco, who with other members of the Caire family hold the title to Santa Cruz, largest of the Santa Barbara group of islands, announced today that it may be necessary to establish a patrol along the shores of the island and eject all campers who do not hold permits from the family of the management… Mr. Caire expressed satisfaction with the action of the legislature in prohibiting the catching of crawfish or abalone for two years. There will be no fishing parties on the islands this year, in consequence. ‘I can remember when we could see large numbers of crawfish along near the shore at Prisoners’ Harbor,’ said he. ‘They are one of the choicest seafoods, and the supply should be protected. Fishermen have been careless in observing the legal limit as to size and no one knows how many undersize fish have been shipped to San Pedro and other markets.’ Mr. Caire said the Chinese who gather abalone and sea weed have caused less trouble on the island than Americans. They pay a small rent for the use of the land and this has served to regulate their actions…”


April 19, 1910 [SBI]: “With the distinction of being the first camping party to visit the islands this season, a jolly party of young society people returned last night after camping out in the open for two days at Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island. In the party were Miss Helen Campbell, Miss Beatrice Wetmore, Mr. And Mrs. J. Uarrn, James M. Warren and Sherman B. Stow… They left Santa Barbara Sunday morning in Captain George Gourley’s launch, the Vamoose, and returned last evening. While on the island the party slept in the open at Prisoners’ Harbor, without even the protection afforded by tents. A feature in the outing was was a visit to the immense wine cellar on the ‘middle’ ranch.”


August 14, 1910 [SBMP]: “A party including Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ruiz and their daughter, Mrs. B. P. Ruiz, and children, Arthur Greenwell and son and others have established a camp near Prisoners’ Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, and will remain for a month, relatives and friends joining them at different times. The trip across was made in the island company’s schooner.”


April 25, 1911 [SBMP]: “The Charm, Captain Short, returned Sunday morning with a merry party of Thacher school boys who spent a week on Santa Cruz Island, with the permission of the Caire company to roam at will. They camped at Prisoners’ Harbor, and made overland excursions that reached every important point on the island. Sunday afternoon, Captain Short crossed the island with D. C. Howe, a Pasadena scientist, who is commissioned by the University of California to secure certain data.”


March 4, 1912 [Frank Nidever to Santa Cruz Island Company]: “I would like to get a permit to camp at Prisoners’ Harbor in that little house for about 6 or 8 weeks. I will pay you two dollars a month for every man that I keep with me which will be two besides me. Three in all. Hoping to hear from you soon. I remain yours respectfully, Frank Nidever”


May 31, 1912 [SBMP]: “Santa Cruz Island may become property of church. Interesting rumor offers explanation for sale of livestock.. Wine to the value of $100,000 shipped this week by Caire estate... The steamer Curacao called to Prisoners’ Harbor this week and took off a consignment of wine valued at $100,000, and this is but a portion of the vintage that the wine cellars of the island contain...”


July 30, 1912 [SBMP]: “A school of anchovies so numerous and densely packed that they crowded each other out of the water was the rather unusual sight witnessed by a party of Santa Barbarans who spent Sunday fishing in the waters about Santa Cruz Island. A five-gallon can full of the little fished was dipped out of the water with a landing net. The phenomenon was witnessed in Prisoners’ Harbor.”


December 11, 1912 [SBMP]: “The freight steamer Coos Bay was reported yesterday northbound, having stopped at Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island on the return voyage from Ventura for a large consignment of wine.”


March 2, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz sailed yesterday afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island.”


April 6, 1913 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, yesterday with a quantity of empty puncheons for island wine.”


July 25, 1913 [OC]: “In Prisoners’ Harbor Sunday, there were three yachts of private parties. One of them carried fifteen millionaires. All others in the harbor were rich men. The parties were chiefly from Montecito and Miramar. There has been talk of Santa Cruz Island being made into a resort that will excel the Catalines and this seems probable.”


March 24, 1914 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Otter, Captain Vasquez, went to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a cargo of lumber for the Caire estate, to be used in various repairs.”


March 26, 1914 [SBMP]: “Captain Vasquez takes a party of ten men, laborers, to the Caire ranch to Prisoners’ Harbor today on the Otter. He will return to the mainland this evening.”


April 25, 1914 [SBMP]: “Twenty-two boys from Dean School in Montecito, boarded the powerboat Otter yesterday afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor, where they will camp until tomorrow afternoon, when they will return to the mainland. They were accompanied by two of the maters of the school, Messrs. Alaben and St. John.”


April 28, 1914 [SBMP]: “Dean School of boys marooned. Otherwise they are having a fine time at Prisoners’ Harbor. A score or more of the boys from the Dean School at Montecito, who went to Prisoners’ Harbor in the Otter last Friday afternoon, to stay until Sunday afternoon, are still at that charming spot. The high wind that has prevailed for the past three days has roughened the surface of the channel… Captain Vasquez came over from the island yesterday and reported the boys well, comfortable and happy…”


December 10, 1914 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


December 26, 1914 [LAT/LB]: “Two launches join search. Two persons remain aboard helpless boat… The steamer Bear, proceeding from San Pedro to Santa Barbara, today sent a wireless message to the Wilmington Transportation Company in San Pedro that the launch Rambler had been sighted riding out the storm about two miles southeast of Prisoners’ Harbor…”


January 2, 1915 [SBMP]: “The steamer Santa Clara left San Pedro at the regular time last Thursday, but sailed directly to Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, for a shipment of wine for San Francisco, after taking which aboard she came in to this port and left for San Francisco.”


January 4, 1907 [SBMP]: “The island schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Santa Cruz Island at an early hour yesterday morning. She brought a quantity of wine for Santa Barbara dealers. She will probably remain here for a couple of days before taking supplies and returning to her home port at Prisoners’ Harbor.”


January 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday for mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 14, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a party of laborers for the Caire ranch.”


January 15, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday for mail and supplies for the Caire ranch.”


January 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “The powerboat Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with supplies and empty wine casks for the Caire ranch.”


January 23, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


February 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


February 19, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of wine. She will probably return to the islands today.”


February 25, 1915 [SBMP]: “Scorpion Harbor scene of drowning. Belisario Valencia is swept from boat in heavy sea. Yesterday afternoon Coroner Ruiz received word from Santa Cruz Island to the effect that Belisario Valencia, one of the Caire employees, had been drowned on the afternoon of the preceding day, at Scorpion Harbor on the south side of the island. The message came from Captain Andreas [Giovanni Battista] Olivari of the power schooner Santa Cruz, who had sent a man over in a launch for the purpose of bringing the information to the coroner. It seems that Valencia was assisting in landing a lot of piles that had been taken from Prisoners’ Harbor to Scorpion. The piles were taken from the schooner onto a small boat to a lighter to the landing. There was a high sea running, and while Valencia and a son of Captain Olivari [Pete] were on the lighter, a huge wave swamped the craft and washed the men overboard. Young Olivari managed to swim ashore, but his unfortunate companion was seen no more. Coroner Ruiz sent word back to the island for the men there to keep a watch for the body of the drowned man and send the body to this city when it should be recovered, for inquest and burial. The deceased was about 40 years of age and a widower. Several relatives live in Santa Barbara.”


March 9, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


March 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday, arriving about noon after supplies for the Caire ranch.”


March 14, 1915 [SBMP]: “The powerboat schooner Santa Cruz started off for Prisoners’ Harbor at an early hour yesterday morning, but when she got about three miles off shore her engine broke down, and after a wait of several hours, she proceeded on her voyage under sail.”


March 24, 1915 [SBMP]: “Herman Norden of Paris, France and a half dozen other guests of the Potter Hotel went to Santa Cruz Island last Monday on Captain Ira K. Eaton's power schooner, the Sea Wolf. The party landed at Prisoners’ Harbor and explored the many beautiful spots of that region so little visited by excursionists in general, and also visited the Caire Ranch, inland…”


March 27, 1915 [SBMP]: “Shearers to island. Unless deterred by unfavorable weather, the power schooner Santa Cruz will take a force over to Prisoners’ Harbor today or tomorrow to get things ready for sheep shearing on the Caire ranch, this work to begin within a week or ten days.”


March 30, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


April 2, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning to get a load of freight brought from San Francisco by steamer for the Caire ranch.”


April 6, 1915 [SBMP]: “Herman Norden of Paris... went on the Sea Wolf... The party was disappointed at not being able to enter Painted Cave on account of rough water, but the excursionists found much to enjoy at Valdez Cave, Pelican Bay and Prisoners’ Harbor...”


April 10, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz went to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon with a load of supplies for the Caire Ranch.”


April 20, 1915 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with Superintendent Revello and twenty-five sheep shearers that he had collected for the annual sheep shearing on the Caire ranch. There are between 30,000 and 40,000 sheep to handle, and the job is expected to take about 60 days.”


April 20, 1915 [SBDNI]: “Sheep shearing is on full blast at Santa Cruz Island. A gang of 25 shearers are at work on the Caire ranch at Prisoners’ Harbor, where nearly 40,000 sheep have to be sheared. The task is expected to require 60 days to accomplish.”


April 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday one of Flying A companies boarded the Sea Wolf for Prisoners’ Harbor to secure pictorial material at that point and in the interior for the great production, The Diamond from the Sky.”


May 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor for supplies for the Caire ranch.”


May 6, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a load of fat sheep for the Gehl Packing Company. Several attempts to land were made, but the water was too rough, and Captain Olivari concluded to wait for smoother water to discharge his cargo.”


May 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “Island boat leaves. The power schooner Santa Cruz, which brought a load of sheep over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Wednesday, and was unable to land on account of rough water, discharged her cargo yesterday and returned to the island with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


May 11, 1915 [SBMP]: “Arthur Caire went to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon on the Caire power schooner Santa Cruz.”


May 19, 1915 [SBDNI]: “So delighted are the Normal School students who went on the excursion to Santa Cruz Island over Saturday and Sunday, with the beauty of the wondrous isle, that they are planning another trip for early July. A total of 37 students, both men and women, enjoyed the outing, returning late Sunday. Various points of interest, including Prisoners’ Harbor, Pelican Bay, Seal Rocks, Painted Cave and Cueva Valdez were visited and explored. The party made the trip in the motorboat Otter, the craft’s business agent, B. Hilbing, personally conducting the students, and seeing that everyone had a good time.”


May 25, 1915 [SBMP]: “Fat sheep received. The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday, after delivering 122 head of fat sheep to the F. N. Gehl Packing Company.”


May 28, 1915 [SBMP]: “A. J. Avery, the contractor, came over from Prisoners’ Harbor on the power schooner Santa Cruz yesterday morning for more materials and more men to use in his improvement work on the island. He was accompanied by a number of men who took advantage of the opportunity to pay a short visit to their families on the mainland. Mr. Avery has had fifteen men at work across the channel during the past two weeks. They have built three large barns and two cottages, and have a lot of work to do yet in construction, remodeling and repairing buildings in different parts of the island.”


June 1, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A party consisting of a dozen Hotel Potter guests, will leave tomorrow in the powerboat Otter, to visit Painted Cave, Fry’s Harbor, and Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. Captain R. Vasquez, master of the boat, will be in charge.”


June 2, 1915 [SBMP]: The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a load of lumber for the building operations now underway on the island and supplies for various camps there.”


June 18, 1915 [SBMP]: “Sheep from the island. The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon with a load of fat sheep for the California Market.”


June 22, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz, after a stay of several days at anchor in this harbor, returned to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


June 29, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which came over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Sunday, sailed for the same port yesterday afternoon with supplies for the Caire ranches.”


July 7, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning, after having taken a very creditable part in the beautiful marine pageant that was so fine a feature of the Fourth of July celebration in Santa Barbara the preceding evening.”


July 16, 1915 [SBMP]: “A. J. Avery and a crew of his workmen went to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday with a load of lumber for the extensive building and repair operations going on in different parts of Santa Cruz Island.”


July 16, 1915 [SBDNI]: “A. J. Avery has returned to Santa Cruz Island to erect more buildings at Prisoners’ Harbor. Yesterday the contractor took over a large amount of lumber and other building material. The steamer Helen P. Drew is due here shortly with 60,000 feet of pine lumber for the island.”


August 5, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz arrived from Prisoners' Harbor about 1 o'clock with 25 cattle for local butchers, and four of the steers jumped overboard from the boat as it lay at the dock, and started in a bee-line to swim back to the island...”


September 12, 1915 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz went to Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, with supplies for the Caire ranch.”


November 21, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz returned yesterday morning from San Pedro, where she had been given her annual overhauling and repainting. She ‘looked like new,’ and made a very neat appearance as she sailed out in the afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor with a load of supplies for the Caire ranch.”


December 1, 1915 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Clara will arrive from Prisoners’ Harbor today with a load of wool to add to a load brought over last Monday for shipment to San Francisco by the steamer George W. Elder. There are 140 bags in the lot, all told, weighing on the average 200 pounds to the bag.”


January 1, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning. The captain and crew will spend New Year's day here and return to the island tomorrow with a load of supplies.”


January 7, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday for a load of supplies for the Caire ranch. The vessel will return to her home port today.”


March 2, 1916 [SBMP]: “A. J. Caire of San Francisco, head of the Caire Estate Company, owner of Santa Cruz Island, came over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Tuesday night and left for Los Angeles yesterday, expecting to go from there direct to San Francisco...”


March 3, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which came from Prisoners' Harbor last Tuesday to bring A. J. Caire to the mainland, returned to her home port yesterday, laden with freight recently brought by steamer from San Francisco for the Caire ranch and a large quantity of supplies.”


April 1, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz is on this side of the channel, and today she will sail for Prisoners’ Harbor with a force of men to get ready for the shearing on the Caire ranch...”


April 4, 1916 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz left for Prisoners’ Harbor Sunday with 25 sheep shearers for the spring shearing on the Caire Ranch. There was a large crowd of the friends of the shearers at the wharf to see the boys start.”


April 18, 1916 [SBMP]: “Captain Charles Hanson came over from Prisoners’ Harbor in his powerboat, the Flyer, last Sunday, and will return to the island today to resume his fishing operations.”


May 14, 1916 [SBMP]: “Good island mutton. Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor with 200 fat sheep for local butchers.”


July 29, 1916 [SBMP]: “Island yields big wine grape crop. Captain Olivari of the power schooner Santa Cruz, who came over from Prisoners’ Harbor last Thursday with 40 tons of wool frofm the Caire ranges, will return this morning with a load of supplies for the various departments of the great island ranch...”


October 21, 1916 [SCICo]: “We are ordering sugar and rice ahead of time as we are somewhat afraid of the creek between the Main Ranch and Prisoners' Harbor.”


November 21, 1916 [SCICo]: “We are now plowing the Avuelo and Pero at Prisoners’ Harbor so as to have them in good shape for alfalfa in the Spring. We will then start plowing at the Sur. We are badly in need of a clod crusher as the ground is as dry as it was in the Summer. In this connection would say that we are losing our pasture at an alarming rate as the grass is drying everywhere.”


November 29, 1916 [SCICo]: “The Avuelo at Prisoners’ Harbor is plowed and soon as the Pico and Pato are finished we will move the men to the Sur with a fence gang and cook.”


December 19, 1916 [SCICo]: “At Prisoners’ Harbor we have rebuilt the outer corral fence. Repaired the creek well N.E. of the house and are now doing creek work west of the gum tree grove as a protection to the road.”


December 31, 1916 [SCICo]: “So far only the east line of the corral fence at Prisoners’ Harbor has been repaired. We used the 4 x 4 posts and made the fence 6 ft. high, the spacing of the boards being practically the same as the sketch in the office. We are entirely out of 1 x 6 fence boards and will have to get more before we can rebuild the balance.”


January 10, 1917 [SCICo]: “The Schooner left for Santa Barbara on January 9th at 3:00 P.M. and returned to the Island on January 10th at 3:00 P.M. with Mr. Troup. We have sold him 19 head of steers at 6-1/2 cents per # on full feed - that is to say we anticipated his arrival and had the cattle at Prisoners’ Harbor and they had been watered and fed before his arrival and were then driven on the scales and weighed without shrinkage. The weight for the 19 head is 18,780 # - $1220.70... Relative to the young pigs by the Yorkshire Boar would say that the last litter born at Prisoners’ Harbor - Mr. A.J. Caire will remember these last pigs he saw there - have made a fine growth and will weigh in the neighborhood of 80 # each and growing every day. They have had an abundance to eat...”


March 21, 1917 [SBMP]: “Yesterday morning the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor with a cargo of wine. She will take back mail and supplies for the island ranches.”


April 27, 1917 [SCICo]: “...at Prisoners’ Harbor hay is being cut and raked. Campo Pero and Avuelo have been planted to corn. The work at the Wharf is being finished.”


June 30, 1917 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of fat steers for the F. N. Gehl Packing Company.”


July 24, 1917 [SBMP]: “Wine from island — Yesterday the power schooner Santa Cruz came over from Prisoners’ Harbor with a cargo of wine for the local market.”


November 17, 1917 [SBMP]: “Captain Ira Eaton came over from Prisoners’ Harbor in the Sea Wolf yesterday morning and returned to the same island port in the afternoon with mail and supplies for the Caire ranch. The Sea Wolf is handling the transportation matters from the ranch named during the absence of Caire’s power schooner, Santa Cruz, while the latter craft is undergoing an overhauling at San Pedro…”


December 20, 1917 [SBMP]: “The power schooner Santa Cruz, which brought a load of fat sheep to the mainland last Tuesday evening for Gehl markets, returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning with a load of supplies for the Caire ranch.”


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