Difference between revisions of "QUAIL"

From WikiName
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 72: Line 72:
  
  
'''1931 SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND'''. A. B. Howell (Pacific Coast Avifauna No. 12, 1917, p. 52) states, in dealing with the Valley Quail, that Mr. Howland of San Clemente Island told him that "there were two or three dozen birds liberated there in 1913." One cannot help wondering whether this may not have been the same liberation reported by Mr. Howland in his letter of January 29, 1926, to Mr. Abbott. Inasmuch as he mentions Banning and Coachella as sources of supply it would seem that both Valley and Gambel quail were introduced on the Island about 1912-1913. Recent attempts to get into touch with Mr. Howland for specific information have been unsuccessful. The writer can say with certainty that the flock from which the two specimens were taken on December 13, 1925, was entirely made up of ''L. g. gambeli''. <br>
+
'''1931 San Clemente Island'''. A. B. Howell (Pacific Coast Avifauna No. 12, 1917, p. 52) states, in dealing with the Valley Quail, that Mr. Howland of San Clemente Island told him that "there were two or three dozen birds liberated there in 1913." One cannot help wondering whether this may not have been the same liberation reported by Mr. Howland in his letter of January 29, 1926, to Mr. Abbott. Inasmuch as he mentions Banning and Coachella as sources of supply it would seem that both Valley and Gambel quail were introduced on the Island about 1912-1913. Recent attempts to get into touch with Mr. Howland for specific information have been unsuccessful. The writer can say with certainty that the flock from which the two specimens were taken on December 13, 1925, was entirely made up of ''L. g. gambeli''. <br>
 
Huey, Lawrence M.    San Diego Society of Natural History, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, October 19, 1931.
 
Huey, Lawrence M.    San Diego Society of Natural History, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, October 19, 1931.
  
Line 78: Line 78:
 
* 1932  [[HUEY, Laurence Markham| Laurence M. Huey]]  [https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v034n01/p0046-p0046.pdf ''Some Light on the Introduction of Gambel Quail on Santa Clemente Island, California'']  34(1):46
 
* 1932  [[HUEY, Laurence Markham| Laurence M. Huey]]  [https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v034n01/p0046-p0046.pdf ''Some Light on the Introduction of Gambel Quail on Santa Clemente Island, California'']  34(1):46
  
 +
 +
'''1984 San Clemente Island:'''  “Gambel's quail (''Lophortyx gambelii'') and the exotic chukar (''Alectoris chukar'') have been introduced and are thriving.”  ''Recovery Plan for the endangered and threatened species of the California Channel Islands'' published by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon 1984.
  
  

Latest revision as of 08:12, 7 November 2019

Quail (Callipepla californica) [Lophortyx]


Quail (Callipepla californica) [Lophortyx] are common introduced residents on both Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands. California quail became the official state bird in 1931.

The Catalina California quail (Callipepla californica catalinensis) is a subspecies that is endemic to Catalina Island and is listed by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as a Bird Species of Special Concern.

The Santa Catalina Island variety of California quail was released on Santa Rosa Island in the early 1930s, and on Santa Cruz Island in 1948 at the Christy Ranch airstrip by the Janss brothers. Carey Stanton wrote:

“I am familiar with the story that there were once quail on the island [Santa Cruz Island] and that they disappeared. Near Laguna Cañon there is a Quail Cañon. In 1948 the Catalina Island variety of California Valley Quail were introduced to Santa Cruz Island and they have done extremely well.” [McElrath, 1967]

The introduced California quail population on Santa Rosa Island also continues doing well. » Janss; Grinnell, J. The Catalina Island Quail in Auk 23: (262-265) 1906.


CLICK HERE FOR MORE ABOUT CALIFORNIA QUAIL


———————


ANACAPA ISLAND

June 24, 1907 [VDFP]: “Bay Webster intends stocking Anacapa Island with quail, and to that end has applied to the State Board of Fish Commissioners for a permit to trap and keep in captivity sufficient birds to make a beginning. They will be liberated on the west end of the island near the highest peak, 930 feet above the sea. This portion of the island has cactus patches hundreds of acres in extent on the southern slope, while the northern slope is mostly grass covered and is furrowed by deep gorges fringed with brush and scrub timber. There are no wild cats, foxes, coyotes or other natural enemies of quail on the island, and there seems to be no reason why the birds once given a start should not thrive and multiply there.”


June 27, 1907 [SBMP]: “Anacapa may be stocked with game birds. Captain Bay Webster, lessee of Anacapa Island, will stock that little rock off in the Pacific with coast quail, if the authorities will give him permission. He has made application to the State game commissioners. If permission is granted, which is expected, Captain Webster will immediately proceed to trap a number of pairs of the little birds and take them to his preserve, twenty miles off shore. Anacapa would be a prime place for the raising of quail. There are no wild animals whatever on the island, such as foxes, wild cats, skunks, weasels or the like, nor are there any snakes or other living things, outside of rats, and it is not thought these latter would bother the birds, preferring to live in the fish leavings and about the houses of the island fishermen. The rats were left on the island by the wreck of the old steamer Winfield Scott in 1849 [1853]. At one time there were hordes of them, but they are getting scarce now. The quails put on the island would have a free run and would, it is thought, increase rapidly.”


June 28, 1932 [SBMP]: “Efforts are being made by a group of southern California sportsmen to establish a private game refuge on Anacapa Island, and the project will be vigorously fought by conservationists and others, County Forester Frank Dunne revealed yesterday. The promoters intend to raise and sell game birds such as quail, grouse and pheasants on the island, and to transport hunters ‘that care to contribute financially’ to the island hunting ground… Bruce G. SeBelle of Riverside, an attorney for the Anacapa Game Bird Company sponsoring the hunting ground, said in his letter to Forester Dunne, that ‘subscriptions will not be accepted, as the project is fully financed’…A lease concession was granted some time ago by the government, to a Ventura firm which takes fishing parties to the island…”


July 5, 1932 [LAT]: “Anacapa hunting planned. Company is formed to stock island with game birds for public preserve. The reclaiming of Anacapa Island, lying off the Ventura County coast, and the propagating of game birds such as quail, pheasants, grouse, etc. as a public hunting preserve, are the purpose of the Anacapa Game Bird Company, which has been formed by a group of Southern California sportsmen. J. Mack Johnson of Redlands, manager of the company, says that the latter is fully financed and that as soon as certain legal problems can be worked out, active development will begin. This will consist of stocking the island with game birds, the erection of a clubhouse or lodge and other buildings, and the establishment of a fast motor-boat service between Ventura and Anacapa. Mr. Johnson says that the company now has on hand a stock of game birds which will be transported to the island at once. Supplemental breeding stock is to be obtained and sufficient birds will be raised domestically as rapidly as possible to stock the island. It is the purpose of the company to conduct at once an extensive reforestation program, planting trees and shrubs that grew there before their partial destruction by grazing sheep. ..”


August 22, 1968 [LAT]: “Hunting Dates. Officials of hunting facilities at Catalina and Santa Cruz islands have set their dates for the 1968-69 seasons. Bill Huffman of the Santa Cruz Island Club said that island will have a split season for boar and sheep, Nov. 2-Dec. 15 and Jan. 4-March 30. Huffman said hunters will be allowed to hunt quail during the first half of the season at no extra charge. He said reservations for the first part of the season are already full and weekends in the second half are almost filled. Doug Bombard announced the following dates for seasons at Catalina: Archery (goat and boar)—Oct. 5-6 and 12-13; Dec. 7-29; March 8-May 25. Rifle (goat and boar)—Jan. 4-Feb. 23. Shotgun (quail)—Nov. 2-Dec. 1.”



SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND

1897 San Clemente Island:Callipepla californica vallicola—Valley Partridge. I found a small number of these birds in a broad canon which reaches the coast a half-mile southeast of China Point. The canon bed was lined with an unusually heavy growth of wild cherry bushes which afforded the only good ground cover on that part of the island. On May 31 I saw two broods of young scarcely a week old. In all, only about twenty adults were noted. I was told by one of the sheep-herders that twelve dozen "quail" had been introduced on the island about ten years ago by an old resident named Gallagher; but on account of the poor cover, and the abundance of foxes which killed the sitting birds in the spring, they had scarcely been able to hold their own. The six specimens taken agree in being slightly lighter than vallicola from Pasadena. The colony may have been obtained from the mainland further south, possibly San Diego, or this slight bleaching may be due to the effects of new food and environments. If the latter is the explanation, it will be interesting to watch developments, in case the change is rapid enough to be perceptible...The party consisted of Joseph Grinnell, who had immediate charge of the expedition, and gave special attention to the ornithology and entomology of the islands; Horace Gaylord, who collected mammals; and Harry Gaylord and James Brittan [Britton] who devoted their time to archaeology. The party left San Pedro harbor May 11 in a large fishing schooner... [returning June 9, 1897]”
Grinnell, Joseph Report on the Birds recorded during a visit to the Islands of Santa Barbara, San Nicolas and San Clemente, in the Spring of 1897 Pasadena Academy of Sciences Publication No. 1, August, 1897 (26 pages).


1912 San Clemente Island: “The quail on San Clemente Island were released by us about 1912. We secured, through the Game Commission, twenty dozen, about one-half of which died before being released. They were caught in the Banning-Coachella district and shipped to Los Angeles. It took about two weeks to get them to the points of distribution and although they were fed and watered there was a heavy loss because of their wildness. The first year or so after being released there was no apparent increase, but I understand that later the showing was quite ‘fair’.”
Laurence M. Huey Some Light on the Introduction of Gambel Quail on Santa Clemente Island, California The Condor 34(1):46 January-February 1932


1920 San Clemente Island: April 16, 1920 Joseph Dixon writes in his field notes on file at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, Berkeley: “I observed with the binoculars this morning at a distance of about 60 yards a pair of Gambel quail. The red of their side and flanks of both sexes was the character that first attracted my attention… I later saw another pair of Gambel quail and enquiry developed the fact that that 50 of these birds had been planted on the island about 1914 by Robert Howland. The desert quail were chosen as best adapted to the desert-like conditions of the southwest end of the island.”


Prior to 1926, it seems that the only quail captured on San Clemente to be recorded in ornithological literature were six specimens taken there by J. Grinnell in May, 1897 (Grinnell, Pasadena Acad. Sci. Publ., 1, 1897, p. 12), all of which were Valley Quail. In the same article Grinnell makes reference to the introduction of quail on the Island, twelve dozen birds having been reported liberated about ten years previously. G. Willett also mentions the Valley Quail as "Occasionally seen on San Clemente" (Pacific Coast Avifauna No. 7, 1912, p. 43).


1931 San Clemente Island: In his article, "New Records for the Channel Islands of Southern California" J. R. Pemberton states that a Gambel Quail (Lophortyx gainbell gambeli) was taken on San Clemente Island by A. J. van Ressero on October 25, 1930, but that details of the introduction of this species on the island are lacking. It may be well to record that on December 13, 1925, the writer took a pair of Gambel Quail, now preserved in the collection of the. San Diego Society of Natural History, from a flock of about seventy-five birds on the south end of San Clemente Island. Upon returning to San Diego the question of the introduction of these quail on the island was discussed with Clinton G. Abbott, Director of the Natural History Museum, who wrote for information to E.G. Blair, President of the San Clemente Sheep Company, which was at that time operating a concession on San Clemente Island. Mr. Blair referred Mr. Abbott to Charles T. Howland, who had earlier been interested in the live stock on the island. Mr. Howland's reply was essentially as follows:

"The quail on San Clemente Island were released by us about 1912. We secured, through the Game Commission, twenty dozen, about one-half of which died before being released. They were caught in the Banning-Coachella district and shipped to Los Angeles. It took about two weeks to get them to the points of distribution and although they were fed and watered there was a heavy loss because of their wildness. The first year or so after being released there was no apparent increase but I understand that later the showing was quite fair."

Pemberton, J. R. New Records from the Channel Islands The Condor 33(5):218-219, 1931


1931 San Clemente Island. A. B. Howell (Pacific Coast Avifauna No. 12, 1917, p. 52) states, in dealing with the Valley Quail, that Mr. Howland of San Clemente Island told him that "there were two or three dozen birds liberated there in 1913." One cannot help wondering whether this may not have been the same liberation reported by Mr. Howland in his letter of January 29, 1926, to Mr. Abbott. Inasmuch as he mentions Banning and Coachella as sources of supply it would seem that both Valley and Gambel quail were introduced on the Island about 1912-1913. Recent attempts to get into touch with Mr. Howland for specific information have been unsuccessful. The writer can say with certainty that the flock from which the two specimens were taken on December 13, 1925, was entirely made up of L. g. gambeli.
Huey, Lawrence M. San Diego Society of Natural History, Balboa Park, San Diego, California, October 19, 1931.



1984 San Clemente Island: “Gambel's quail (Lophortyx gambelii) and the exotic chukar (Alectoris chukar) have been introduced and are thriving.” Recovery Plan for the endangered and threatened species of the California Channel Islands published by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, Oregon 1984.


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
San Clemente Island Joseph Grinnell LACM May 31, 1897 LACM-5699 Callipepla californica californica Birds
San Clemente Island Joseph Grinnell LACM June 3, 1897 LACM-5708 Callipepla californica californica Birds
San Clemente Island Joseph Grinnell LACM June 3, 1897 LACM-5740 Callipepla californica californica Birds
San Clemente Island Joseph Grinnell LACM June 3, 1897 LACM-5741 Callipepla californica californica Birds
San Clemente Island M. M. Peet (?) UMMZ June 21, 1938 UMMZ-122700 Lophortyx gambelii gambelii Birds


In the News~

September 26, 1897 [LAH]: “...Lying off the coast of Southern California are two islands — Santa Catalina and San Clemente... The latter is owned by the Government, and is twenty miles farther out to sea; its sole resident is old Tom Gallagher, who has lived there ever since the war — nearly forty years... Eagles build their nests on the beetling cliffs, wild goats infest the mountains, and timid quail dart through the sage brush...”


September 14, 1899 [SFCall]: “Pasadena, September 13. San Clemente, a desert island so called, which lies in the Pacific in the Santa Barbara channel group, is to be colonized, if the plans of Mr. Bolton and forty odd families of this neighborhood he has interested do not fall through. These families have pooled their belongings and propose to squat on 160 acres each… San Clemente is frostless. There is water standing in pools in the canyons. Wild goats and quail are there in abundance...”



SAN NICOLAS ISLAND

June 1962 William C. Townsend reports: Lophortyx californicus. California Quail. Sixty-four birds of this species were introduced in June 1962. Twenty were observed on 21 December 1962. Several were reported but not observed on 3 October 1963. Four were seen on 2 February 1964. » Townsend, William C. Birds Observed on San Nicolas Island, California in Condor 70:3 (266-268) May-June.


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
San Nicolas Island Walter Wehjte WFVZ June 6, 1994 WFVZ-165221 Lophortyx californica Eggs


SANTA CATALINA ISLAND

Endemic Santa Catalina Island Quail, Santa Catalina Island
Photo by Carlos de la Rosa

The Catalina California quail (Callipepla californica catalinensis) is a subspecies that is endemic to Catalina Island and is listed by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as a Bird Species of Special Concern. It is abundant on Catalina and has also been introduced to Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands.

  • 1905-1906 Santa Catalina Island:Lophortyx catalinensis. Catalina Island Quail. Abundant both seasons. A half-completed nest was found on a narrow ridge that overlooked the ocean. It resembled the nests of the mainland species, being built of dried grass in a hollow flush with the surface. [“These notes are the result of two brief sojourns on Santa Catalina Island in the month of April, eight days being spent in 1905, and five in 1906. Fortunately both trips were made after wet seasons; the hills were carpeted with grass, flowers and insects were abundant.”]
    Richardson, Charles H., Jr. Spring Notes from Santa Catalina Island The Condor 10(2):65-68, March 1908



ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN  
Santa Catalina Island Frank Stephens SDNHM August 26, 1886 SDNHM-254 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 19, 1892 USNM-140911 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Frank Stephens SDNHM March 25, 1893 SDNHM-255 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Frank Stephens SDNHM March 26, 1893 SDNHM-256 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Frank Stephens SDNHM March 27, 1893 SDNHM-257 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ November 25, 1904 MVZ-32040 Callipepla californica catalinensis holotype Birds
Santa Catalina Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ November 25, 1904 MVZ-32041 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ November 25, 1904 MVZ-32042 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn WFVZ July, 1907 WFVZ-12768 Lophortyx californicus Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn AMNH August 20, 1907 AMNH-807982 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn AMNH August 20, 1907 AMNH-807983 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright MVZ September 1, 1907 MVZ-32042 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright AMNH February 1, 1908 AMNH-807984 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright AMNH February 1, 1908 AMNH-807985 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright MVZ February 2, 1908 MVZ-17204 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright MVZ February 2, 1908 MVZ-17205 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright AMNH February 3, 1908 AMNH-807986 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright AMNH February 4, 1908 AMNH-807987 Lophortyx californicus catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island H. W. Wright MVZ February 4, 1908 MVZ-17206 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn MVZ February 1, 1910 MVZ-106787 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn MVZ February 4, 1910 MVZ-17206 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island P. I. Osburn MVZ February 21, 1912 MVZ-106788 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-3421 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-3422 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-3423 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-3424 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-7473 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 21, 1920 UCLA-7475 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 27, 1920 UCLA-3471 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 30, 1920 UCLA-3490 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 30, 1920 UCLA-3491 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 30, 1920 UCLA-3492 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 30, 1920 UCLA-3493 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Kenneth E. Stager UMMZ December 21, 1938 UMMZ-122690 Lophortyx californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Kenneth E. Stager UMMZ December 21, 1938 UMMZ-122691 Lophortyx californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Kenneth E. Stager UMMZ December 22, 1938 UMMZ-122692 Lophortyx californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island Kenneth E. Stager UMMZ December 22, 1938 UMMZ-122693 Lophortyx californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 16, 1939 WFVZ-13268 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 16, 1938 WFVZ-13269 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island E. N. Harrison WFVZ November 25, 1962 WFVZ-10387 Callipepla californica catalinensis Eggs
Santa Catalina Island E. N. Harrison WFVZ November 25, 1962 WFVZ-10388 Callipepla californica catalinensis Eggs
Santa Catalina Island Mark Holmgren CCBER September 19, 1990 CCBER-25574 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Catalina Island Mark Holmgren CCBER September 20, 1990 CCBER-25575 Callipepla californica Birds


» Dickey, Donald R. and A. J. van Rossem The Validity of the Catalina Island Quail in Condor 24:1 (34) January-February 1922.


August 30, 1879 [SDU]: “On the Island of Santa Catalina, in the hills, hundreds of wild goats and quail innumerable are to be found.”


July 16, 1882 [LAT]: “Col. Banbury, Mr. Woodbury, Mr. Washburn and Mr. Giddings, of Pasadena, and Mr. G. A. Brandis of Los Angeles, returned yesterday from a very enjoyable trip to Catalina Island. They caught 1225 barracudas, three jewfish and a large number of yellowtails in about three days. About two hundred campers are now on the island. There are an abundance of sheep and some wild goats. A few years ago about 150 quail were let loose on the island which have multiplied to such an extent that they are wonderfully abundant everywhere…”


September 5, 1883 [LAT]: “To the Editor. Sir. We find the following brilliant essay in the Herald of yesterday: ‘Quail cannot be killed until the first of October. Thirty days more during which people will violate this needless law and thousands of quail be killed for food. What is the use of this law anyway? …The use of that law is to put a stop to ground-sluicing young quail in July and August as they approach in flocks to the little springs of Catalina Island—a process that in all probability the Herald man is conversant with…’”


August 19, 1886 [LAT/SCat]: “Santa Catalina Island, An enthusiastic Angeleños account of the resort… A German who seems to have taken up his retreat there, replied: ‘vell dere ish seven or eight thousand vild goats und about twenty wild cows, und ofer fifty vild jackasses’… in addition can be mentioned twenty thousand sheep, the property of Howland, Whittley & Co., who rent the island from the Lick estate… Mr. Whittley, who has immediate care of the island, does not object to the shooting of the goats, not the many quail…”


August 28, 1889 [LAH]: “C. A. Sumner, the popular manager of the Metropole, got up an expedition to the famous Black Jack Peak yesterday. Black Jack is about 2,600 feet high, and in the center of the wildest part of the island, surrounded by a wild jumble of peaks and canyons. The party consisted of Miss Chambers, the Misses Gilbert, Mrs. Dr. Kannon, Miss Agnes Wilson, Robert Vandervoort, John W. Vandervoort, Mr. McGuire, C. F. Holder, Frank Whittley, C. A. Sumner, Dick Sumner, Cecil Sumner and three guides. The Wanda took the party to Gallagher's Landing, where Mt. Whittley met them with horses and accompanied the party throughout the entire trip, adding much to their pleasure by his extreme courtesy and kindness. Mr. Whittley owns all the sheep on the islands. He has lived there for thirty-four years, and has the largest sheep corral in the world. The party rode to Black Jack, made the ascent and returned by Middle Ranch, a most delightful horseback ride of fifteen miles, and one that all who come here should take. The quail shooting was simply the finest I have ever seen...”


November 12, 1889 [LAT]: “A party of 25 or 30 is talked of to go to Catalina for three days; a winter fish, a wild-goat hunt, an outing with the quail, a ball at the Metropole, and home.”


March 7, 1897 [NYT]: “Rare winter sport on a beautiful California island… A charming resort where valley quail and wild goats are ready for the hunter who can ride well and shoot quickly... The island abounds in quail — the beautiful valley variety — jaunty little fellows with plumed heads…”


December 18, 1898 [LAT/SCat]: “Avalon. One of the best wing shots on the island is Miss Lundblom. Yesterday she bagged quite a number of quail, and as the day was warm, she sat down on a rock to rest for a moment, when she was startled by some animal jumping out of the brush nearby. As the fleeing animal reached an open spot, she fired and brought it down. It proved to be a fox, which Manager Biddle is having mounted to further decorate the Hotel Metropole office.”


December 20, 1898 [LAT/SCat]: “Avalon. George T. Foresman went out on the trail Friday and killed five goats and a dozen and a half quail.”


January 3, 1901 [LAT/SCat]: “Avalon. Alfred Reed, Norwood Howard and Mr. Bradley wound up the quail shooting of the season by bringing in a few dozen birds on Monday.”


October 17, 1901 [LAT/SCat]: “Manager Orr and A. M. Brown of San Francisco, who with his wife are spending some time at Hotel Metropole, went up to White’s Landing yesterday afternoon and in an hour and a half bagged twenty-three quail. W. P. Dunham and son, who have been camping up the island since Sunday, returned today. They got all the goats and quail they could shoot.”


October 8, 1903 [LAH]: “Within five minutes walk from Avalon there are big coveys of quail, and the same condition is said to exist all over the island. They are especially plentiful near Middle Ranch, where they are so tame that they hardly more than leave the road to escape passing teams.”


September 29, 1914 [TI/Avalon]: “A. J. Coxe and Col. J. E. Stearns are trying to propagate, and have given liberty to several pairs of pheasants at different parts of the island. Hunters are earnestly requested to refrain from shooting these game birds. It is believed that in a few years they will become as numerous as our local quail and doves if they are unmolested, and given a chance to breed.”


October 13, 1914 [TI/Avalon]: “Dove and quail shooting on Catalina Island is prohibited. The game birds are getting scarce.”


October 20, 1914 [TI/Avalon]: “The hunting and shooting of doves and quail on Santa Catalina Island is strictly prohibited. All persons caught violating this rule will be prosecuted. Santa Catalina Island Co.”


November 17, 1914 [TI/Avalon]: “The quail season closed at midnight Sunday.”


October 5, 1915 [TI/Avalon]: “Quail season opens October 15. It is said that the birds are so tame they will allow persons to approach within a few feet before taking flight. The ordinance against hunting or shooting in the city limits is to be rigidly enforced this year.”


October 24, 1916 [TI/Avalon]: “Quail hunters report that the birds are somewhat difficult to locate, owing to the recent rains.”


October 31, 1916 [TI/Avalon]: “Quail hunters… No one this season has reported having taken the limit.”


May 22, 1917 [TI/Avalon]: “Wild quail, everywhere on the hillsides, are a great attraction to visitors. The young birds are almost as tame as chickens.”


November 13, 1917 [TI/Avalon]: “The quail season opens Thursday, November 15th, and will continue through January. The limit for mountain quail is lower than for valley quail…”


November 13, 1917 [TI/Avalon]: “The quail season opens Thursday, November 15th, and will continue through January. The limit for mountain quail is lower than for valley quail…”


December 18, 1917 [TI/Avalon]: “…Middle Ranch is the starting point for the quail hunter. He can go in any direction, finding quail plentiful; taking a daily hike into new territory, up different canyons, and with a full quota of birds in each… It is not the easiest quail hunting in the world, but with a limit of only fifteen birds and the game plentiful, a little hard work is worth while in order to make a day’s outing…”


January 1932: “In a report received from Herbert M. Sangler, volunteer deputy, it is revealed that there are quite a number of quail on Catalina Island, but the birds do not seem to increase from year to year in large numbers. ‘This is due to the fact, I believe, that there are so many stray and homeless cats which roam the island in search of food,’ he said. ‘Since January 1, 1931, more than 110 cats have been trapped. Fish scrap is used for bait. The number of cats shot and killed is not known.’ He also reported that many cattle, goats and horses roam over the island and probably destroy many of the quail nests. The report also noted that dove are not plentiful on the island, due in part, to the same reasons that affect the quail supply.” 1932 [California Fish and Game Bulletin 18:11 (71)]


SANTA CRUZ ISLAND

According to Greene, E.L., in a short article he published in 1886 in West American Scientist, quail were introduced to Santa Cruz Island in the 19th century.

Two California quail, now in the collections of the California Academy of Sciences, were collected on Santa Cruz Island in April 1898. The species apparently disappeared, and there are no records of quail sightings during the first half of the 20th century.

In 1948, with permission from island owner, Edwin Stanton, several dozen Santa Catalina Island variety of California quail (Lophortyx californica catalinensis Grinnell) were released on Santa Cruz Island at the Christy Ranch airstrip by the Janss brothers. Carey Stanton wrote:

“I am familiar with the story that there were once quail on the island [Santa Cruz Island] and that they disappeared. Near Laguna Cañon there is a Quail Cañon. In 1948 the Catalina Island variety of California Valley Quail were introduced to Santa Cruz Island and they have done extremely well.” [McElrath, 1967]


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN  
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CAS April 16, 1898 CAS-44294 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CAS April 16, 1898 CAS-44319 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. H. Miller MVZ March 6, 1950 MVZ-120090 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. H. Miller MVZ March 6, 1950 MVZ-120091 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Richard A. Bradley Columbus, OH (BLB) Recordings May 16, 1987 BLB-39845 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Lyndal Laughrin SBMNH May 27, 1989 SBMNH OS-4334 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Lyndal Laughrin SBMNH 1989 SBMNH OS-4340 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Lyndal Laughrin SBMNH 1989 SBMNH OS-4372 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Mark Holmgren CCBER December 9, 1989 CCBER- 23965 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Mark Holmgren CCBER December 9, 1989 CCBER-23986 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Lyndal Laughrin SBMNH June 1, 1991 SBMNH-5867 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Kevin Colver Columbus, OH (BLB) Recordings September 17, 1998 BLB-30790 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Kevin Colver Columbus, OH (BLB) Recordings September 17, 1998 BLB-30791 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Timothy A. Burr CLO August 23, 2002 CLO ML-111187 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Timothy A. Burr CLO August 24, 2002 CLO ML-111188 Callipepla californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island Timothy A. Burr CLO August 25, 2002 CLO ML-111882 Callipepla californica Birds


1886: “... the eggs of the California quail are fairly increasing, which bird was also introduced, have in some measure escaped, for this species is fairly increasing.”


1898: Joseph Mailliard and his wife, Julia, collected two California quail on Santa Cruz Island on April 16, 1898. They are in the collections of the California Academy of Sciences [CAS-44294; CAS-44319].


October 27, 1914 [SBDNI]: “After passing several days on Santa Cruz Island, rusticating, catching fish, shooting at quail, wild boars, and other ‘varmints’ in season, and generally experiencing a Robinson Crusoe life, ten players and mechanical department employees of the Santa Barbara Motion Picture Company, are back on the job today, having returned last evening from the island, to which they went Sunday.”


July 17, 1995 [Bill Janss interview at Christy Ranch, Santa Cruz Island]: “There weren’t quail here… Mr. Stanton, who had been to Catalina many times… used to come to our cattle ranches a lot, and he made a deal with the people — Mr. Wrigley — on Santa Catalina, to get some quail, and he had a problem of getting them from there to here. My brother and I each had a Navion aircraft built by North America right after the war, so we said we would go down there, fly down, pick up the quail, and bring them up here, because that was a short flight, really. It’s about ten or fifteen minutes out to Catalina. They would load them in the plane. I think we had twenty cartons that would fit into each of the aircraft. We flew back directly to the coast, up the coast, and came out here, landing at Christy strip. It was in great shape. Very smooth. They had built the pens along along this stream they have in this [Christy] valley, and that is where they were going to put the quail and feed them and let them get assimilated for about two weeks. Then they would open the doors to the pens, leaving them open. The water and feed were there so the quail had a home, and then could ultimately get very well acquainted and take off. There were about twenty in each carton, so I guess we had maybe four or five hundred quail… That happened in 1947…”


May 1951 Alden H. Miller reports: “California Quail (Lophortyx californica) have been planted on the island in recent years, but this has not been reported in the literature. They are said to be Catalina Island stock and specimens verify identification with the island race catalinensis as is true also of those planted on Santa Rosa. Quail were seen on Santa Cruz near the Stanton Ranch and also at Willows Anchorage, 3 miles southwest across a high ridge, and they were noted commonly on Santa Rosa.” [Miller, Alden H. A Comparison of the Avifaunas of Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Islands, California in Condor 53(3):117-123 May-June 1951].


April 10, 1967 [Carey Stanton]: “I am familiar with the story that there once were quail on the island and that they disappeared. Near Laguna Canyon there is a Quail Canyon. In 1948 the Catalina Island variety of California Valley Quail were introduced to Santa Cruz Island and they have done extremely well.” [Clifford McElrath On Santa Cruz Island (1967). Introduction by Carey Stanton.]


SANTA ROSA ISLAND

ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN  
Santa Rosa Island K. E. Stager LACM November 14, 1941 LACM-20092 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Rosa Island Q. S. Q. MVZ December 1, 1941 MVZ-84311 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Santa Rosa Island Q. S. Q. MVZ December 1, 1941 MVZ-84312 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Santa Rosa Island W. G. Abbott SBMNH September 25 1975 SBMNH-3332 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Rosa Island W. G. Abbott SBMNH September 25 1975 SBMNH-3333 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Rosa Island W. G. Abbott SBMNH September 25 1975 SBMNH-3334 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds


In the News~

ISLAS CORONADOS

ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN  
Islas Coronados A. J. Van Rossem UWYMV April 4, 1908 UWYMV-208 Callipepla californica californica Birds
~ trip ~
Islas Coronados A. B. Howell UCLA July 7, 1910 UCLA-7443 Callipepla californica californica Birds
~ trip ~
Islas Coronados A. J. Van Rossem UCLA January 29, 1913 UCLA-10234 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Islas Coronados A. B. Howell UCLA June 29, 1913 UCLA-8909 Callipepla californica californica Birds
Islas Coronados A. J. Van Rossem UCLA June 29, 1913 UCLA-8925 Callipepla californica californica Birds


all