Restless

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Sloop Restless

Restless (#) (1893-1907), operated by Captain Samuel Burtis, was a commonly chartered sloop around the turn of the century for island camping parties. Restless was apparently lost on a trip to San Nicolas Island in 1907.


1893. Eunice Felton diary: We saw in the local newspaper that the sloop Restless was prepared to take parties [to Santa Cruz Island] and that the Captain had a permit to land with his passengers. As soon as everything was landed [at Cueva Valdez], the Captain and his boy said farewell and betook themselves to their sloop, Restless, which showed the appropriateness of its name by the way it jumped about on the rough sea.”

» Felton, Eunice Camping on Santa Cruz Island (circa 1890) in A Step Back in Time: Unpublished Channel Islands Diaries. Santa Cruz Island Foundation Occasional Paper #4, 1990 pp. 60-73.


1893. Peveril Meigs Jr. diary: “It was a jolly party that assembled at the wharf on the appointed morning, and embarked on the sloop Restless for a trip to Santa Cruz Island. The little sloop was pretty well crowded. [Weeks later] we saw the Restless lying at anchor ready to take us home.

» Meigs, Peveril A Trip to Santa Cruz Island, 1893 in A Step Back in Time: Unpublished Channel Islands Diaries. Santa Cruz Island Foundation Occasional Paper #4, 1990 pp. 74-79.



In the News~

April 29, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The pretty new boat Restless, Captain Burtis, made her second appearance with a party of some twenty-five passengers. The Restless is a pretty little craft, the hull painted a bright pea green, and decks and rails and sails snow white. She has a full cabin and has a 33-foot keel, 37-foot deck and 10-foot-beam.”


May 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “There is another new boat on the bay, smaller than the Restless, La Paloma by name...”


May 13, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless has returned from Flea Island where she has been on a hunting expedition...”


May 16, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless leaves this morning for the islands on a fishing trip.”


May 17, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Maurice C. Kittridge, accompanied by Captain Burtis on the Restless, bound for Flea Island, with supplies for the sealers there.”


May 27, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop yacht Restless with Captain Burtis in charge, has left for the islands with the first island camping party of the season. Those in the party are: Mr. And Mrs. Sidebotham, Miss Fernald, Reginald Fernald, Mr. Edwards Roberts of Boston, Mr. Rogers of Chicago and Mr. Felton and family. They will be absent about ten days, during which time they will visit several of the islands.”


June 2, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless, Captain Burtis, will take a trip in the channel Sunday. Anyone wishing to enjoy the sail can obtain tickets at Pratt & McKean’s drug store or on the boat Sunday. The start will be made about 9:30 or 10 o’clock.”


June 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless will go to the islands tomorrow.”


June 6, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left for the islands last night.”


June 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless came in last night and expected to return this afternoon.”


June 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “Captain Burtis, who has just returned with the Restless from San Miguel Island, reports that the wind has been blowing a gale for fourteen days. He attempted to get around the end of the island but the wind was too strong.”


June 19, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless arrived Saturday from the islands with eleven live seals, recently ordered by Thomas Shooter of Los Angeles. The seals are fine specimens and are in good condition. They will be loaded on the car tonight for shipment to Los Angeles.”


June 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “A party of pleasure seekers were out sailing in the yacht Restless yesterday.”


June 30, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless has received a letter from the Secretary of the Hueneme District Agricultural Association stating that the date of their Fair had been changed to the next week, following the Santa Barbara Fair, which would be beginning August 29th.”


July 3, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless will not go to Ventura tonight as expected. A picnic party has engaged the boat tomorrow for a trip up this coast.”


July 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning.”


July 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooners Santa Rosa, San Mateo, and the sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning. The Santa Cruz returned to the island yesterday.”


July 5, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless went north with a party of excursionists Tuesday.”


July 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless leaves tomorrow for Santa Cruz and San Miguel islands after a party of sealers.”


July 11, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sailed at 3 o'clock this morning for San Miguel Island.”


July 18, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless arrived last night from San Miguel Island with a party of sealers and some oil and hides, the result of several week’s hunt.”


July 20, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless leaves Sunday for the islands with a party of pleasure seekers. Another party goes over Tuesday.”


July 22, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless leaves tomorrow with a party of campers. Another party will be taken over Tuesday.”


July 24, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless sailed for the islands Sunday morning between eight and nine o’clock with quite a party. The Restless is expected back today. Several of the party will return with the boat, but most of them will remain on the island. The Restless takes another large party tomorrow, including Mr. Reed, Mrs. Kitteredge and about twenty-five others.”


July 25, 1893 [SBDI]: “A large party of campers left this morning for the islands on the sloop Restless, expecting to be gone a week or ten days. The party consisted of the following persons: Mrs. Kittredge, Miss Maude Kittredge, Miss L[orena] Stewart, Masters Robert and Milton Stewart, Mr. Reed, Miss Fannie Reed, Masters Lewis and Winfield Reed, Miss Dayton, Mrs. Boyce, Miss Sarah Boyce, Mr. E, S, Barrows, Miss A. E. Jennings, Miss J. Weldon, Miss Mattie Snell, Miss Ord, Messrs. Peveril Meigs, Charles Cronise, Harry Cooper, Robert Owens, Duncan McDuffey, Lewis and Robert McDuffey, Arthur Crookall, Albert Palmer. The party took a cook with them — a very desirable part of the outfit—and expect to have a grand good time.”


July 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “When the Restless left yesterday morning for the islands with a party of pleasure seekers on board, two young men accompanied them a mile or two up the channel and then rowed back…”


July 29, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop-yacht Restless arrived from the islands last evening with several members of the party that has been camping on Santa Cruz Island. The party included: Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and sister, Mrs. Burtis, Mrs. Preston, Miss Rundell, Miss Hammond, Mr. Pierce… This morning the Restless left with the following party: F. M. Whitney… The Restless will return Monday with some campers now at the island.”


July 31, 1893 [SBDI]: “Miss Walbridge, E. B. Pratt and A. A. Boyce arrived from Santa Cruz Island on the Restless yesterday.”


July 31, 1893 [SBDI]: “The yacht Restless returned from Santa Cruz Island Sunday afternoon. The Restless made the trip from Cueva Valdez, Santa Cruz Island, to Santa Barbara in three hours and a half yesterday.”


August 3, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless was expected today from Santa Cruz Island with a party of pleasure seekers who have been there for two weeks. Mr. Reed, Mrs. and Miss Kitteridge and others compose the party. La Paloma, one of Larco’s sailboats, took a party out to meet the Restless this afternoon.”


August 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Restless came in last evening with Mr. Reed and party from the islands.”


August 7, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless came in Thursday evening, bringing in the large party of campers who have spent the past ten days on Santa Cruz Island.”


August 8, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless came into port yesterday afternoon with a party of campers among which were F. M. Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. McKey and the Misses Nixon.”


August 11, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Quite a large party went over to the islands in the Restless Sunday, returning on Monday in the short time of six hours.”


August 12, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “F. M. Whitney, Mr. McKey and wife and the Misses Nixon have just returned on the sloop Restless from the islands.”


August 31, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “There is trouble on the island kingdom of President Justinian Caire of the Santa Cruz Island Company. It appears that Mr. Caire has had his son on the island as superintendent, and that there is considerable pains being taken to discourage people from landing thereon. Two young men from this city, R. Vasquez and Manuel Alves, have been on the island since July 15 gathering abalone shells and abalones from the rocks and cliffs on the north side. They had collected fifteen sacks of abalone meat and twelve sacks of shells, and on the 24th began taking them to Surprise Harbor, where the schooner Restless was to come and take the boys and their load to this port. It proved to be a surprise harbor for them, for when they were bringing their last load in the skiff from Lady Harbor, they saw the gasoline launch Santa Cruz leaving in a hurried manner, and on following her in a skiff, found that she had taken their stuff on board. They went to the superintendent, but he would give them no satisfaction and ordered them away. Saturday they swore to a complaint charging young Mr. Caire and the steam schooner’s captain with theft, and Constable Dan Dover left for Santa Cruz Island on the Restless Sunday with the intention of arresting the two men.”


September 1, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The constable, Dan Dover, came back from the islands Wednesday night, and announced that Mr. Caire and the captain of the gasoline schooner at Santa Cruz, whom he went over to arrest, had steamed out of the harbor on the gasoline boat, and beat the Restless over, defying his attempts to arrest them. They were arrested here and released on their own recognizance. They returned to the island Thursday.”


September 6, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless left Tuesday for Santa Cruz Island to bring back a camping party.”


September 12, 1893 [SBDI]: “Sloop Restless will leave this city in a day or two with Mr. E. Elliot and a party of sheep-shearers. They go to San Nicolas Island to leave the shearers and the Restless will return with a load of sheep. She will then return for the men and go to Anacapa where the sheep on that island will be sheared.”


September 29, 1893 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless is in from Anacapa Island with a cargo of wool. Mr. Elliott was a passenger.”


October 21, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, is back from San Pedro, where she has been undergoing a thorough cleaning. E. B. Pratt returned with the boat.”


December 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left today for the islands. Bob Ord and party engaged the boat for an otter hunt.”


January 5, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless with Captain Burtis on board, left yesterday for San Pedro where she will be laid up for the next couple months. The sloop has been on an otter hunt at the islands for the past month, but reported an unsuccessful trip.”


April 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, is expected from San Pedro.”


April 18, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from Santa Cruz Island after taking over a party on a craw fishing expedition.”


May 1, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, made the run from Santa Barbara to San Clemente Island, a distance of 145 miles, in 19 hours the other day; the Restless took a cargo of Chinamen to the island to hunt abalones. The sloop is expected back tonight.”


May 2, 1894 [SBDI]: “Captain Burtis arrived from the south last evening with the sloop Restless.”


May 3, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, will go to San Nicolas Island with a party of sheep shearers.”


May 5, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless sailed for San Nicolas Island.”


May 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless left for San Nicolas Island yesterday.”


May 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from a trip to San Nicolas Island, to which a party of sheep shearers was taken.”


May 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless yesterday brought 110 sheep and 20 bales of wool from San Nicolas Island for E. Elliott.”


May 12, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless is in the harbor from San Nicolas Island.”


May 17, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, left for San Nicolas Island yesterday for a weeks trip. She will bring back a cargo of wool.”


May 25, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left for Dos Pueblos this morning.”


May 30, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless has been provided with a new mainsail. The Restless leaves the latter part of the week for San Nicolas Island, for Mr. Elliott. On the 14th the sloop will take a party to the islands.”


June 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless is at the islands engaged in transferring sheep from San Nicolas Island to Anacapa Island. The sloop will bring a cargo to Santa Barbara on the return trip.”


June 14, 1894 [SBMP]: “Mr. E. Elliott returned at an early hour yesterday morning on the Restless from a trip to San Nicolas and Anacapa islands...”


June 14, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop yacht Restless, Captain Burtis, came in at 1 o’clock this morning from the islands. Captain Burtis said that on Friday night, he anchored at the east end of San Nicolas Island, and that there was such a gale blowing that landing was out of the question. A short time after he had anchored, a five-ton sloop belonging to Frank Fazzio of Ventura, came in and dropped anchor about two hundred fathoms astern. In the morning she was gone. Captain Burtis said that she had probably dragged her anchor and drifted out to sea, and, in his opinion, it was impossible for her to weather the storm, as, in his twenty years’ experience in the channel, he had never seen such a sea. Inquiries by telephone to Ventura, however, resulted in the assurance that the sloop had arrived there all right, but only after a very narrow escape.”


June 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left this morning for Santa Cruz Island with a pleasure party, on a short camping trip. They will be gone a week.”


June 21, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop yacht Restless left this morning with a party of pleasure-seekers for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 22, 1894 [SBMP]: “A camping party of twelve left on the Restless for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning.”


June 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “A party of campers has engaged the Restless to take them to Santa Cruz Island next Sunday.”


June 28, 1894 [SBMP]: “Captain Burtis left on the Restless yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 28, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop yacht Restless sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island. She is engaged to take another party of campers to the same place next Sunday.”


July 5, 1894 [SBMP]: “A party of 20 young people left on the sloop Restless yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island on a camping trip. Mr. Peveril Meigs had charge of the party and all were looking forward to a pleasant time.”


July 6, 1894 [SBMP]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless this morning started for Santa Cruz Island with a party of pleasure seekers. On arriving at the island, she will return with a party already there.”


July 11, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “A large party of campers left this morning in the sloop Restless for a camping expedition at the islands.”


July 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless returned from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


July 13, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless goes to Santa Cruz Island today with supplies and will return with a party of campers.”


July 14, 1894 [SBMP]: “The Restless came in yesterday afternoon with a camping party aboard from the islands.”


July 18, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless came in last night, bringing a party of campers from the islands.”


July 19, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless, left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning to bring back a party of campers who have been spending the past week there.”


July 21, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sails for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow with Dr. Hall and party on a camping trip.”


July 23, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


August 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island, bringing over Dr. Hall and party, who have been camping there.”


August 8, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop yacht Restless last night brought Dr. Hall and party over from Santa Cruz Island, where they have been camping for some time past.”


August 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left yesterday for San Miguel Island to bring over a party of Chinese abalone fishermen.”


August 13, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless arrived from San Nicolas Island Saturday night with a load of shells and abalones, being the property of a party of Chinamen who have been camping there.”


August 30, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless arrived from San Clemente Island last night with a cargo of abalones and shells, being the catch of a party of Chinamen who have been at work there for some time past.”


September 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island with a party of campers.”


September 5, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless left this morning with a party of campers for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless returned last night from the islands.”


September 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning for a couple of days, with the following jolly party of Santa Barbara boys: Peveril Meigs, Martin Meigs, Duncan McDuffie, Robbie McDuffie, Robert Stewart, Francis Lord, Harold Spencer, Lawrence Redington, and J. T. Crane.”


September 15, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless took a party out in the channel today on a fishing expedition.”


September 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless had a sailing party out in the channel yesterday.”


October 6, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sailed today for Santa Catalina Island where she will be given a coat of fresh paint.”


October 17, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless returned yesterday from Santa Catalina Island where she has been undergoing some repairs.”


October 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless sailed yesterday for Santa Rosa Island.”


1895. Peveril Meigs Jr. reported: “I had received our camping permit from Caire, and had chartered the Restless. The Restless is far from being a yacht, either in appearance or in sailing qualities. Originally she was built for Alaskan otter hunting, with the mast stepped well forward in plunger style. Afterwards it was set six or seven feet further aft, a jib boom was added so as to admit of a sloop rig, and she carried grain upon the muddy waters of the Sacramento until her trade was spoiled by the shallow draught river steamers. Burtis, who is a old sailor and quite a character in his way, had found her in the flats lying near the River, and seeing that her timbers were sound, bought her for a mere song and after refitting, sailed her down the coast to Santa Barbara where he managed to pick up a good living. The sloop herself was about 36 feet overall, was a stiff sea boat, and possessed great carrying capacity, but although her sails and spars were in good condition, her standing and running rigging was in poor shape.”  » Meigs. Memories of Santa Cruz Island, 1895 in A Step Back in Time: Unpublished Channel Islands Diaries. Santa Cruz Island Foundation Occasional Paper #4, 1990 pp. 80-139.


April 9, 1895 [SBDI]: “Last night Captain Burtis and L. B. Pratt arrived in the harbor with the favorite pleasure boat, Restless, from San Nicolas Island. Last December Mr. Pratt went to the island with Captain Burtis and four otter hunters and leaving them there took the sloop to San Pedro, put her in winter quarters and returned here. A short time ago he left here for the island and has been spending some time cruising around, having visited Santa Catalina, San Clemente and the other islands, finally bringing up at San Nicolas. Here he found the otter hunters glad to see him and glad to leave the island. Their trip was not very successful, for although they killed five otter, none of them were secured, the strong undercurrent carrying them out to sea, and the sea being so rough that to launch a boat was impossible. Soon after arriving at the island the men found a box of butter and some wreckage, presumably from the steamer Los Angeles, as no other American vessel has been wrecked on this coast which would be apt to have just such freight. This is a wonderful find, as the island is about 200 miles from the place of the wreck. Mr. Pratt says he was at sea on March 29th, the night the Liberty was wrecked and that the wind was blowing strong from the nor’west, but that there was certainly no tidal wave as he would have felt it if there had been. He said, however, that the first question asked by the otter hunters on San Nicolas was if there had been an earthquake on the mainland. They said that on March 9th they were shaken up severely. It will be remembered that this was the day of the Mexican earthquake and also San Miguel upheaval, which gives some color of truth to the report of the disturbances, although there is no doubt that the reports were exaggerated.”


April 10, 1895 [SCF]: “Santa Barbara, April 9. The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, arrived in port last night from San Nicolas Island where she stopped to take on board a party of otter hunters who had been on the island since December 1. The first questions asked by these hunters, who have been entirely cut off from communication with the word since they went on the island, was whether there had been a shock of earthquake on the mainland the night of March 9, as San Nicolas was surely shaken up by a subterranean agitation on that date. As this coincides with the date of the San Miguel upheaval it confirms the theory that the disturbances at San Miguel Island that date were due to severe and wide extending seismic convulsions. There is considerable discussion as to the truth of the old Spanish sea captain’s assertion that there was a submarine explosion in the Santa Barbara channel on the night of March 29, but so far the captain stands alone in his assertion, backed only by the fact that the sloop Liberty went ashore at Cuyler’s Harbor on that date.”


April 26, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless returned this morning from San Nicolas Island.”


April 30, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, left yesterday afternoon for San Miguel Island.”


May 6, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed today for Catalina Island.”


May 14, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop yacht Restless returned last evening from Santa Catalina Island with a cargo of gravel.”


May 16, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless left this morning for San Miguel Island and Point Conception.”


May 20, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless returned last night from San Miguel Island. She came down the south side of Santa Rosa Island and passed in full sight of the wreck of the Crown of England. Captain Burtis says that no work was being done there, that the sea was very heavy and was washing entirely over the wreck which he thought had swung around from her original position on the shelf rock.”


May 21, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless is in from San Miguel Island and the captain reports that he came down the south side of Santa Rosa Island, passing in full view of the wreck of the Crown of England, and that no work was being done there. The sea was heavy and was washing entirely over the wreck.”


May 28, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless with Captain Burtis, E. B. Pratt, C. A. Storke and Maurice Kittredge returned last evening from Santa Cruz Island. The party had considerable experience with the weather on this trip. They came back with double-reefed mainsail and small jib, and the water rolling entirely over the little ship, which rode the storm in fine style.”


June 10, 1895 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara, June 9. The sloop Restless yesterday returned from Anacapa Island bringing back several Santa Barbara gentlemen who for a week or so past have been prospecting for precious metals upon that rocky point of the channel archipelago. They were led to examine into the mineral resources of Anacapa by the tradition that an old Spanish mine of fabulous richness existed there, the secret of whose location was lost.”


June 12, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, left for San Miguel Island this morning.”


June 29, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from Catalina. She has been given a new coat of paint, and overhauled generally.”


July 3, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless leaves tomorrow with Peveril Meigs and party for the islands. They are going prepared for an extended camping trip.”


July 8, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, leaves tomorrow for Quava Val Dez, Santa Cruz Island, with several young people who will join the Meigs party camped at that point. A week from today another large party will go to the island on the Restless.”


July 9, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless will leave in a day or two for Anacapa Island with Messrs.. Pratt, Storke, and others, who will further investigate the gold discovery.”


July 11, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “A mining party left today (Wednesday) by the schooner Restless for Anacapa Island. The gentlemen comprising the expedition were Messrs. Lansley, Pratt, Storke, Dodge, and T. Storke.”


July 12, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless came in from Anacapa Island this morning with a party of gold prospectors. The reason for the quick return is that the sloop has an engagement for Monday to take a camping party to Santa Cruz Island. Mr. Storke said that they were not at the island long enough to ascertain anything further, and there was nothing new to report. With the use of dynamite the men went down eight feet below the former excavation; they found that the rock was not so far decomposed as that nearer the surface, but was full of metal. They brought over about half a ton and will send samples to San Francisco.”


July 13, 1895 [SBDI]: “A party of about 25 will go to Cueva Valdez, Santa Cruz Island, in a few days to spend two or three weeks in camp. The Restless will take the advance party Monday, and the others will follow Wednesday...”


July 14, 1895 [SBMP]: “The following party leaves tomorrow for Cueva Val Des [Valdez], Santa Cruz Island, on the Restless, Captain Burtis: Mr. M. B. McDuffie, Duncan McDuffie, Miss Kittridge, Maude Kittridge, Miss Metcalf…”


July 15, 1895 [SBMP]: “The Restless started for the island this morning with the party of campers; at three o’clock the sloop was still in sight from the land, being becalmed in the middle of the channel.”


July 15, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless started for the island this morning with the party of campers; at three o’clock the sloop was till in sight from land, being becalmed in the middle of the channel.”


July 16, 1895 [SBMP]: “The Restless returned from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a party of thirteen campers. They have been at Quava [Cueva] Valdez for the past ten days. Included were Miss Rosamond, Peveril and Martin Meigs, Fred Poett, Misses Lorena and Mary Stewart, Mrs. Stewart, Robert and Milton Stewart, Walter Wilkinson, Mr. Devenes, Miss Dayton and Russell Brown. Duncan McDuffie, who went over Monday with seventeen campers, came back on the Restless, will return to the island tomorrow with twelve more of the same party. The Restless was becalmed about five miles out on her way over Monday, but she caught a stiff breeze at 3 o’clock and reached the island shortly after 6 o’clock.”


July 16, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Restless returned from the islands this afternoon with Peveril Meigs, Mr. Wilkinson and party; the sloop will leave in the morning with about fifteen young people who will join Mr. McDuffie’s party.”


July 16, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “An exodus of some of the prominent society people of this city took place this Monday morning for Cuava Val Dez [Cueva Valdez], Santa Cruz Island. The party expects to be absent for three weeks. They have taken tents, servants and the good things of life, and intend to enjoy themselves hugely. The following persons compose the party: M. B. McDuffie, Duncan McDuffie, Miss Kittredge, Miss Maud Kittredge, Miss Sanborn, Miss Gertrude Owen, Miss Hand, Miss Darrah, Miss Johnson, Mr. Last, Albert Palmer, H. Cooper, Robert Owens, C. R. Broughton, Charles McDuffie. Captain Burtis of the schooner Restless will have the pleasure of taking the campers to their destination. On Wednesday the party will be increased by the addition of the following named persons: Miss Metcalf, Miss James, Miss Thompson, Miss M. Diehl, Miss G. Diehl, Mrs. Porteous, Miss Snell, Miss Hosmer, Mrs. Robert Jennings, Fred Lamb, Mr. Conklyn, E. Hamilton, W. Flint and E. Boeseke.”


July 16, 1895 [SBMP]: “The camping party of thirty who left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday got an early start, but owing to a lack of wind the trip was a very slow one. The sloop Restless, which carried the party, could still be seen at three o’clock in the afternoon out in the channel.”


July 17, 1895 [SBMP]: “The Restless returned from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a party of thirteen who were camping for the past ten days at Quava [Cueva] Valdez. The party consisted of Peveril Meigs, Martin Meigs, Miss Rosamond Meigs… As stated yesterday, the Restless was becalmed about five miles out on her way over Monday…”


July 17, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless, in charge of veteran Captain Burtis, who has passed his life on the ‘rolling deep,’ and for a score and more years has been identified with boating interests in the Santa Barbara Channel, is having a busy season. The sloop will make three trips and return across to the islands this week. The popularity of Santa Cruz Island as a camping place has grown wonderfully in the past few years; and it may not be more than a decade before a resort like that which has made Catalina famous will be established on another isle of the Santa Barbara group.”


July 20, 1895 [SBDI]: “The Genova returned today from the island, reporting the sloop Restless safe in Prisoners' Harbor. The party was landed safely on the afternoon of Wednesday, and Captain Burtis started back for the mainland. About a mile and a half out from Cueva Valdez the mast gave way under the heavy wind that was blowing, and with the sail fell over the side... The Restless worked her way to Prisoners Harbor about 15 miles distant, and Captain Burtis was busy making repairs.”


July 20, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless is reported lost off Santa Cruz Island, with eighteen persons aboard. Last Monday a party of well-known young people left the port on a pleasure trip to the islands on the Restless. The sloop started in the morning and made very slow progress so long as in sight, being plainly visible at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. A reasonably brisk breeze was blowing, and it is not known whether anything was the matter with the sloop at that time. She was expected back two days ago, and last night parties commenced getting uneasy about her return…”


July 20, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “Another account. On Wednesday morning the schooner Restless left this port with a party of eighteen persons bound for Santa Cruz Island on a camping expedition. The Restless was to have returned to Santa Barbara late the same night for the purpose of taking Dr. Hall and some friends to the island. She is now overdue two days, and the relatives and friends of the persons on board have become alarmed. A searching party went out this morning on board the schooner Genova in her search for the lost schooner. The most optimistic of the sailors of this city are of the opinion that the Restless is all right, and that the delay has been occasioned by failure to leave Santa Cruz Island on time… The Restless is of twenty tons burden, and owned by Messrs. E. B. Pratt and Samuel Burtis, residents of this city…”


July 20, 1895 [REG]: “The sloop Restless is safe and none hurt. The wind is blowing very hard at Santa Cruz Island and carried away part of the rigging before landing the party. After putting all safely ashore she started back. The main mast was carried away a mile and a half off Cueva Valdez, where the party is camping. The captain fitted a jury mast and sailed into Prisoners’ Harbor. The main mast was then cut off and stepped. It will be back this evening.”


July 21, 1895 [SFCall]: “There is rejoicing in Santa Barbara. At 2 o'clock today the Genova returned from Santa Cruz Island bringing word that the party which sailed from here on the Restless was safe, and explaining the sloop's unaccountable failure to return at the appointed time, Wednesday afternoon, as she expected. Tonight the Restless sailed into port with a stump of a mast and the story of its adventure was told. The Restless reached Cueva Valdez Point, where the Santa Barbara party is encamped, and landed all her passengers safely. She then started on her return trip, but when about a mile and a half from the island, in a heavy sea, a stiff breeze carried away all her rigging and her mainmast. Captain Burtis states that he heard two distinct snaps, but so far as the eye could discern both rigging, jib and mainmast — in fact the entire top rigging — went by the board in one and the same instant. Happily the deck, which had been crowded with passengers but an hour previously, had but three men on it and these managed to get out of the way of the falling timbers. Captain Burtis, who is an experienced sailor and rich in resource, at once set to work and rigged a jurymast out of a tent pole he was carrying as part of a camping outfit. Boys belonging to the camp on shore came to his relief and rendered valuable assistance. Swimming around, they fastened a line to the floating mast and rigging, and towing it by this line the Restless sailed with its stump of a mast and sail, reaching Prisoners Harbor, near the east end of the island, that night and entering the next morning. There a considerable delay was caused by the action of Justinian Caire of San Francisco, owner of the island, who happened to be there at the time. For several years there has been a mild warfare going on between the owners of these islands across the channel and the people of the mainland, the owners positively prohibiting camping parties from landing in some instances and in others requiring them to make formal application for permission. Mr. Caire at first refused the captain permission to tie up at the wharf and make the necessary repairs on his wrecked boat, alleging in justification that Captain Burtis had been landing people who had not procured permission. After considerable parlay a compromise was effected, and terms were agreed upon by which Captain Burtis was given permission to tie up. This delay caused the captain to lose the early morning tide, and he was forced to wait for the next tide in order to go up to the wharf and step his mast, having no other means of handling it. The Genova reached Cueva Valdez at 2 o'clock yesterday, and ran down to Prisoners Harbor at 3 o'clock. There Messrs. Pratt, Forbush and Larco rendered timely assistance to the Restless. The mast, which broke off two feet above deck, but was sound throughout, was put in place again, shortened eight feet, and shortly after they left the captain set sail, reaching Santa Barbara tonight. The little boat is eleven years old was originally built for the California Oyster Company and used to sail in San Francisco Bay. She is made of oak throughout, and is staunch and sound. With her shortened mast she is safer than ever, although she many not be so fast a sailor. The reports sent out by the United Press last night brought telegrams from all parts of the country. The brother of one of the women passengers telegraphed from Minneapolis for the first information received, while another young brother here patrolled the wharf all last night. Relatives and friends in San Francisco and Oakland have been showering telegrams here all day, but now the tide has turned, and cheering messages are flying everywhere over the wires.”


July 21, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless returns safe to port. She lost her mainmast in a squall of Santa Cruz Island. The anxiety that has hung over this city like a pall for the past two days on account of the uncertainty of the party that left here on Wednesday morning on the Restless, has been relieved by the return of the Genova that went in search of the supposed wrecked vessel. The Genova returned today at 1 o’clock, and the beach was lined with persons who were anxious to ascertain the first news that could be had… The Genova found the schooner Restless docked at Prisoners’ Harbor, making repairs to its rigging and mainmast… On account of some past misunderstandings between Justinian Caire, owner of Santa Cruz Island, and Captain Burtis, part owner of the schooner Restless, the vessel was not permitted to come alongside the dock at Prisoners’ Harbor until after considerable parley between Caire and Burtis… It is due to Mr. Caire to say that he refused to permit Captain Burtis to dock, because the latter has been in the habit of landing camping parties on the island against the former’s protest…”


July 21, 1895 [SFC]: “…The Genova reached Cueva Valdez at 2 o’clock yesterday and ran down to Prisoners Harbor at 3 o’clock. There Messrs. Pratt, Forbush and Larco rendered timely assistance to the Restless. The mast, which broke off two feet above the deck, but was sound throughout, was put in place again, shortened eight feet, and shortly after they left the captain set sail, reaching Santa Barbara tonight. The little boat is eleven years old, was originally built for the California Oyster Company and used to sail in San Francisco Bay. She is made of oak throughout, and is staunch and sound. With her shortened mast she is safer than ever, although she may not be so fast a sailor…”


July 22, 1895 [SBDI]: “Dr. and Mrs. R. J. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Whitney and party, leaving yesterday in the Restless for the islands took with them a carrier pigeon belonging to M. W. Pierce. They intended turning the bird loose some time today, with a message telling of their arrival at Friar’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, where they will camp for two weeks.”


July 25, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless came in last evening about 4:30 from the island with M. B. McDuffie, Mr. Conklin, George Sanders, and Miss Mattie Snell from Quava [Cueva] Valdez Camp. The rest of the party will remain until the 30th. The Restless left at 10 o’clock last night for the island taking a supply of provisions and the mail. The sloop will visit both Quava Valdez and Dr. Hall’s party at Friar’s Harbor and will return Sunday. Captain Burtis reports that the carrier pigeon taken on the last trip was turned loose Sunday afternoon, and started directly toward Santa Barbara. It never came back.”


July 25, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless is in from the islands. Captain Burtis reports that he let loose a carrier-pigeon from Friar’s Harbor Sunday afternoon with messages for persons in this city. The dove, however, has failed to make its appearance at its cote in Santa Barbara. Captain Burtis says it reminds him of the raven that Noah sent out, and which never came back. The carrier was the property of M. W. Pierce.”


July 26, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless departed last Wednesday night for Quava Val Des, Santa Cruz Island, with a coop of carrier pigeons. These pigeons were sent to the island by the Independent, and for the purpose of having a daily communication with the numerous campers at Quava Val Des. These birds are the property of M. W. Pierce, George Culbertson and M. Hawcroft. There are two noted flyers in the lot of pigeons designed for this service. A pigeon was to have been let loose Wednesday night, but as none has shown up at the cote today, it is thought that the Restless did not arrive at its destination in time.”


July 26, 1895 [TVWT]: “It was feared that the sloop Restless was lost off Santa Cruz Island, California with sixteen young persons on board.”


July 29, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless was in Saturday from the islands, reporting all well at the various camps. Colman Broughton came over with Captain Burtis and returned again Sunday. The party at Quava Valdez will break camp Wednesday.”


August 1, 1895 [SBDI]: “The sloop Restless came in at 8 o’clock last evening from Quava [Cueva] Valdez with Duncan McDuffie, Fred Lamb and a party of about 25. They left Santa Cruz Island at 12:30, and made a good trip until within a few miles of home when the wind left them. The young folks report an excellent time, and all thought the time too short.”


August 3, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The camping party that left here for Quava Val Dez, Santa Cruz Island, on the schooner Restless about two weeks ago, and were thought to have been wrecked, returned to Santa Barbara Wednesday night. All report having enjoyed a delightful time. The earthquake experienced on last Friday in this city was felt on the island very perceptibly. The campers are not aware that any serious damage was done to the island by the convulsion of nature referred to.”


September 1, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The three boats which regularly ply between Santa Barbara and the islands… the Restless, Captain Burtis’s sloop, all came in yesterday afternoon. The Restless brought over a hundred lambs from San Miguel Island. She reports everything quiet over there.”


September 16, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless was out today with a party of well-known Barbareños, who enjoyed a pretty day on the channel.”


September 25, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The sloop Restless came in from San Miguel Island today with a cargo of eighty sheep.”


October 1, 1895 [LATSBC]: “The sloop Restless, Captain Burtis, will leave soon for Anacapa Island.”


March 5, 1896 [LAH]: “The report from Los Angeles concerning secreting illicit Chinamen on San Clemente Island is not believed here. A party of Santa Barbara Chinamen has been on the island several weeks, gathering fish and shells. The schooner Restless is now on her regular trip to Clemente with provisions.”


March 5, 1896 [LAT]: “The schooner Restless is now on a regular trip to San Clemente with provisions.”


March 16, 1896 [SBDI]: “The Restless left this afternoon for San Miguel Island for a cargo of lambs.”


April 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The Restless has arrived from San Miguel Island with a cargo consisting of one hundred sheep.”


April 6, 1896 [SBDN]: “…The Philadelphia had hardly cast anchor before the Restless swung to within the kelp. She was loaded with horses from the islands, and the visitors on the beach were treated to quite an amusing spectacle as the horses, one by one, were made to jump into the surf and swim ashore. The work was done quite systematically and no trouble whatever was experienced in getting the horses to terra firma.”


May 2, 1896 [SBDN]: “The Santa Barbara Sea Lion Company has four fine specimens of seals at the wharf awaiting shipment to London. The seals were brought from Santa Cruz Island by the schooner Restless.”


June 6, 1896 [SBDN]: “The schooner Restless returned yesterday afternoon from San Miguel Island where she has been on a seal hunting trip for the Santa Barbara Sea Lion Company.”


June 8, 1896 [SBDI]: “Captain Burtis left last night for the islands in command of the schooner Restless with S. H. Burtis and R. C. Ord as passengers, bound for the islands on a peculiar errand. In old times the Channel Islands were the home of sea otters in great numbers, but they were so persistently hunted that they have been supposed to have been extinct for years. Captain Burtis, however, is sure that a few specimens at least remain, and that he himself has seen them. With this idea he has shipped a numerous crew and has gone in quest of those rare and valuable animals. The sea otter of the North Pacific is the largest of living otters, often reaching a length of four and a half feet, and is found in the open sea often many miles from land. Its fur is of great value, bringing in its raw state often two hundred and fifty to three hundred dollars, and is especially prized in China and Japan. It is exceedingly difficult to capture, and must be tired out by persistent rowing and shot when exhausted. Captain Burtis is an old sea otter and seal hunter, with great experience in Alaskan and Japanese waters, and is confident of returning with at least a couple of pelts.”


June 10, 1896 [SBDN]: “The Restless returned from San Miguel Island this morning with Captain Waters and Sam Gaty.”


June 10, 1896 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless arrived this noon with 100 lambs as a cargo from San Miguel Island, and Captain Waters, Mr. T. E. Powell and Mr. Samuel Gaty as passengers.”


June 18, 1896 [SBDN]: “The Restless arrived this morning from the islands with 17 sea lions. That makes 20 now on the wharf. The whole lot will be shipped south on the Corona tomorrow night en route for Central Park, New York City, where they will be placed in the Zoological Gardens.”


June 18, 1896 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless has returned from Santa Cruz Island with a catch of twenty-five seals aboard. After over a month of rough weather which made the capture of the amphibians almost impossible, a calm ensued and in five days the six sealers, which are under the command of Rosaline Vasquez, succeeded in filling the order given by Captain Mullett. Four sealers are still at work at San Miguel Island and their catch will be added to those present on the dock and will be shipped east and then by steamer to their destination in London, Amsterdam, etc. The seals are fine, young and healthy.”


June 22, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “Mr. And Mrs. Charles Curryer and Albert Neely and his mother area awaiting the return of the schooner Restless from Santa Cruz Island, for an opportunity to go to San Miguel Island to spend the summer.”


July 1, 1896 [SBDN]: “Gerard Barton, Robert Fulton and Duncan McDuffie were on the schooner Restless when she started for the islands today.”


July 1, 1896 [SBDN]: “Schooner Restless started for San Miguel Island this morning. At Gaviota she will take on board Captain Waters and proceed to her destination where she will take on board a load of sheep returning to this city in six or seven days.”


July 7, 1896 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless arrived from San Miguel Island last night, having on board 100 lambs and Messrs. Gerard Barton and Robert Fulton as passengers.”


July 8, 1896 [SBMP]: “Forcible possession to be taken of San Miguel Island. The United States Marshall Covarrubias and twelve deputies left on the schooner Restless last night to take possession of San Miguel Island for survey by the United States government.…”


July 8, 1896 [SBDN]: “An expedition left this port at 10 o’clock last evening, which may or may not have an interesting story to tell of its return. It went out on the schooner Restless and was in command of U.S. Marshall N. A. Covarrubias. There was a party of surveyors on board and a number of men armed with Winchester rifles. A party of 22 in all. The party started for San Miguel Island, and there is a little story to tell in order to make the case perfectly understood. The island is the property of the U. S., and was reserved as a sight for a lighthouse. For a number of years it has been nominally in the possession of private individuals, Captain Waters now claiming ownership. He has quite a flock of sheep on the island and in its possession has been reported to have a nice little property. We enter into no discussion as to ownership of the land. It is not within the scope of this article. Captain Waters claims the island as his. The Government claims it as its own. In such contests the Government being strongest usually wins. Some time ago for reasons all its own, the Government decided to make a careful survey of the whole island. A party of surveyors was gathered, brought to Santa Barbara, and preparations made to go to the island and begin the work. Captain Waters asserted that the island was his and that no surveyors should land, and if they did land, he would shoot every mother’s son of the outfit. This threat delivered in the captain’s most energetic manner cast a heavy chill over the whole party, for Captain Waters is rather celebrated for meaning what he says, and though he was really throwing down the gauntlet to the whole nation, casting defiance in the face of the whole Government, Cleveland and his whole gang, Waters went the deck and never budged a peg. Not so the surveyors, they did budge, and the expedition was given up for the time being. Lately the Government has decided that it will probably escape a war with Spain, that the Venezuela borders will be definitely settled in a century or two, and that it is now free to carry on a little discussion with Captain Waters. Orders were given to reorganize the surveying party, and Marshal Covarrubias was directed to take what force was necessary, proceed to the island of San Miguel, land the surveyors and protect them by armed men. Hence the loading of the schooner Restless with grub, and her sailing away in the gloom of night as was stated in the beginning of this article. We shall await the return of the expedition with interest, for the Marshal is as determined a man as Captain Waters and will not stand any nonsense at all.”


July 11, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “On her last trip to the islands the schooner Restless had a distressing experience. The gaff broke and the mainsail gave way. The crew had a hard time making their destination. Mrs. Miller says there was something more than pleasure in her trip as administratrix of the A. P. More estate. Two suits have been brought against J. F. More individually for wages by Vicente Valenzuela and Frank Ybarra for work during the time he was acting as administrator. Papers were filed this morning.”


July 13, 1896 [SBDN]: “Schooner Restless returned from her trip to San Miguel Island at 6 o’clock Saturday evening. She had a peaceful voyage, but the trip was not uneventful. On her way out she met with calms which retarded her journey, so it was late Thursday before she got off from Gaviota. While waiting for the winds off that spot, it decided to land and have a barbecue... Arriving at the island, the Marshal went ashore and met Captain Waters on the beach. After greeting and shaking hands the following conversation took place: ‘Captain Waters what is the best way to get these surveyors ashore and at work?’ ‘This is private property and we cannot allow and will not allow them on shore.’ ‘Don’t get excited. I’ve got orders signed by President Cleveland telling me to put them ashore and protect them. I’ve got the deputies here in sufficient force and I shall have to do it.’ ‘Let’s see your orders.’ They were read and the captain said he was not going to butt against the whole country besides resisting the U.S. Marshal, so he would make no opposition. Only, he didn’t want them to kill his sheep. He would give them all the mutton they wanted, but he wanted to select it. It was so agreed, and the captain sent down a team and hauled the baggage up to the shed where the men were to encamp. That ended the business and the whole expedition was a success.”


July 13, 1896 [SBDN]: “San Miguel has fallen and Captain Waters is no longer the owner of a foreign principality. Saturday night U.S. Marshal Covarrubias and his 15 deputies arrived on the Restless. They reported that after examining the papers in the case, Captain Waters had offered no objection to the survey and that U.S. Surveyor Stone had been left in his charge with seven assistants. The addition of the new territory to the United States was celebrated by raising the stars and stripes and the firing of a salute of 46 guns, one in honor of the new accession of territory. The deputies and surveyors crowded the little schooner uncomfortable and the wind being light, landing was made at Gaviota, where the party remained until Friday when they again set sail for Cuyler’s Harbor.”


July 14, 1896 [LAT]: “San Miguel. Marshal Covarubias returns from a successful journey… A week ago today Marshal Covarrubias went to Santa Barbara. There he hired the sloop Restless, provisioned the boat for a cruise, engaged a lot of deputies at $5 a day and dispatched the vessel… to San Miguel Island…”


July 22, 1896 [SBDI]: “The Restless with Winfied Moore on board came in this morning from Santa Rosa Island. Mrs. Miller the administratrix of the A. P. More estate and Attorney Storke will remain on the island till next trip, which will be the latter part of the week.”


August 4, 1896 [SBDI]: “The Restless came in last evening with Mr. Reed and party from the islands.”


August 19, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless left this morning for a trip to San Nicolas Island.”


September 8, 1896 [SBDN]: “Captain Burtis went over to the islands today in the schooner Restless.”


November 3, 1896 [SBDN]: “Captain Burtis of the schooner Restless, was all ready to go to Gaviota with a load of lumber yesterday. But the genial captain discovered by reading the news that an election was to be held in this land of ours, and he, being a full-fledged American citizen, decided to wait and cast his vote before venturing on the briny.”


November 13, 1896 [SBDN]: “Captain Burtis brought the schooner Restless into port last night from San Miguel Island with six tons of wool aboard.”


November 13, 1896 [SBDN]: “Schooner Restless returns to San Miguel Island today with a lot of Chinamen who go there to gather abalone shells.”


January 19, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The Louisa D, the sealing schooner, resumed her voyage Sunday evening.”


February 4, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The sealing schooner Luisa D, Captain Sam Burtis, was again in the harbor last evening. Captain Burtis reports a heavy wind up the coast.”


February 9, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The sealing schooner Eppinger is in port today. This morning a skiff containing three of her men was capsized in the channel. The men clung to the overturned boat until rescued a few minutes later.”


February 12, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “A sealing cruise. The schooner Restless, now at San Pedro, will soon be fitted out for a sealing cruise in the Santa Barbara Channel. Harvey Jacobs, a young otter and seal hunter, who made a great record early in the season on the northern coast, has chartered the boat and engaged a number of men and hunters from this city. He will provision the schooner for a several weeks’ cruise.”


March 3, 1897 [SBMP]: “Harvey Jacobs, the champion seal and otter hunter, left yesterday for the islands in the Restless, with which he has just returned from up the coast where he went to bring down his camp. He made a very brief visit to his mother here. He is accompanied by his brother, Clarence.”


March 18, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “A telegram was received today from Pasadena announcing the death near that city of Edward B. Pratt, the druggist. Mr. Pratt had been ailing for two years past, but was not considered seriously ill until last July, when he fell into the water from his schooner, the Restless, and caught a severe cold… Mr. Pratt leaves a widow and an aged mother. He was a native of New Hampshire, removing to Minnesota while a boy, and coming to Santa Barbara in 1889. He was 29 years old.” [Different Restless?]


July 7, 1897 [SBDI]: “Capturing seals. The first installment of a big shipment east. Fourteen barking sea lions lie confined in cages in the water beneath the wharf and the Restless has returned to Santa Cruz Island for another lot. The seals are for Captain Mullett and will be shipped to New York as soon as the balance of the consignment of forty arrives. Colis Vasquez arrived from the island Monday in the Big Loafer with ten seals, and he returned last night with Captain Burtis in the Restless. His party remained on the island, but may return with the Restless.”


July 22, 1897 [SBMP]: “Charles Curryer and wife have arrived here from San Miguel Island after an absence from the mainland of over a year. Mr. Curryer goes with Captain Burtis on the schooner Restless today to San Pedro where the vessel will be copper bottomed before returning.”


July 23, 1897 [SBDN]: “C. V. Curryer and family of San Miguel Island, left this morning on the schooner Restless for San Pedro.”


July 23, 1897 [SBDN]: “Captain Burtis sailed this morning for San Pedro with the schooner Restless. The Restless is to have her bottom re-coppered.”


February 18, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, has arrived with a cargo of abalones from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 7, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came over from Santa Cruz Island with eight hundred sacks of abalone shells and the Restless arrived from San Nicolas Island with three hundred sacks of the same freight.”


April 2, 1898 [SDET]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Duertz, three days from Santa Barbara, arrived this morning. The Restless will take a number of Chinamen to San Clemente Island to engage in abalone hunting.”


April 5, 1898 [LAT/SD]: “The schooner Restless has arrived from Santa Barbara, and will sail this week for San Clemente and Catalina.”


June 19, 1898 [SBMP]: “The Restless brought over a cargo of abalones and shells from San Clemente Island yesterday.”


March 19, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The Restless has arrived from San Nicolas Island with a cargo of abalones and shells.”


April 4, 1899 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless arrived from San Miguel Island Monday morning laden with abalones and shells.”


April 6, 1898 [LAT/SD]: “The schooner Restless sailed today for Catalina and Clemente islands with a lot of Chinamen who go to gather abalone shells and meat.”


April 7, 1899 [SBMP]: “The Restless sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with a party of pleasure seekers on board.”


June 1, 1899 [LAT/SP]: “Schooner Restless, Captain Julius, from San Nicolas Island with four tons of wool for Los Angeles.”


July 8, 1899 [SBDI]: “The yacht Restless left for the islands this morning.”


August 1, 1899 [SBMP]: “Ex-mayor Whitney and party leave this morning on the Restless for Frye’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. This makes Mr. Whitney’s second camping trip this summer.”


August 8, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “Mayor Edmond M. Burke left here on the schooner Restless this morning to spend a short vacation on the Channel Islands. He was accompanied by eight friends.”


August 22, 1899 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless will arrive this evening from the islands with a party of campers.”


August 28, 1899 [LAT]: “Santa Barbara. The loss of the schooner Magic, which went on the rocks last week and now lies at the bottom of the channel at the islands, has thrown the crawfish cannery back a week, and left a large number of people out of employment for that length of time. The sloop Restless of this port has been chartered to bring crawfish from the Channel Islands, and will arrive with the first cargo of the season in a few days.”


January 15, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless returned from Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon.”


January 19, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless will leave for Santa Rosa Island tomorrow.”


January 29, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless returned from Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


February 15, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless arrived from the islands yesterday afternoon. It will return in a few days.”


March 22, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless left for Santa Rosa Island this afternoon.”


March 27, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless came over from the islands last night.”


March 29, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “J. S. Hanchett, a well-known San Francisco man, and his father-in-law George Crocker, left here late last night on the schooner Restless for Santa Rosa Island, one of the channel group. The purpose of the visit is a thorough inspection of the island which Mr. Hanchett is to make for an eastern syndicate.”


March 31, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless returned last night from Santa Rosa Island with the men who went over some time ago to repair the wharf there.”


April 4, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless will leave for Santa Rosa Island tomorrow.”


April 17, 1900 [SBMP]: “One of the most youthful, as well as enthusiastic yachtsmen along the waterfront is Clinton Seely. He is a youth of only about 15 years, but has gained through experience quite a knowledge of handling small boats, and recently made a trip to the islands with Captain Burtis in the Restless.”


April 17, 1900 [SBMP]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, was in port yesterday after a trip to Santa Rosa Island with a cargo of supplies.”


April 28, 1900 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless came in yesterday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island.”


April 28, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless left for Santa Rosa Island this morning with supplies.”


May 3, 1900 [SBWP]: “From the Islands—The sloop Restless came in yesterday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 10, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless will leave for Santa Rosa Island tonight.”


July 12, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “A large band of Mexican sheep shearers were rounded up yesterday and taken aboard the schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, for transportation to Santa Rosa Island.”


July 21, 1900 [SBMP]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed for the island.”


July 26, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless will leave for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow and will return with the Whitney camping party.”


August 20, 1900 [SBDI]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, came in yesterday from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 12, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, will leave this morning for a short trip to the islands.”


September 29, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless returned from San Pedro yesterday, having been thoroughly repainted and overhauled.”


October 1, 1900 [SBDI]: “The Restless, recently overhauled at San Pedro, yesterday resumed her regular trips to Santa Rosa Island.”


October 31, 1900 [SBDI]: “The Restless is in today from the islands.”


November 1, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless arrived from Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


November 5, 1900 [SBDI]: “The Restless came in yesterday with a party of sheep shearers.”


November 16, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless left yesterday morning for San Nicolas Island with a number of Chinamen, who will remain there for several months gathering abalones and shells.”


November 28, 1900 [SBDI]: “The Restless left for San Miguel Island today with Captain Waters.”


November 29, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless left yesterday morning for San Miguel Island with Captain W. G. Waters.”


December 19, 1900 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, just in from across the channel, reports extremely heavy nor’west seas on the other side. Captain Waters and men were left on San Miguel Island several weeks ago, the Restless intending to revisit them before the winter seas began to roll, but the undertaking would be hazardous now.”


In 1901 Philip Mills Jones chartered Restless to take him and his archaeological party to Santa Rosa Island. [Jones: 1901, p. 204].


January 1, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Rosa Island Sunday. The channel has been very rough for the past few days.”


January 15, 1901 [SBDI]: “The sloop Petrel, Captain Rosaline Vasquez, and the schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed for the islands this morning.”


January 24, 1901 [SBDI]: “The steamer Restless, Captain Burtis, came in port from Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


January 25, 1901 [SBMP]: “The Restless, has arrived from San Miguel Island.”


January 26, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, will leave tomorrow morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


February 8, 1901 [SBDI]: “The Restless sailed for Santa Rosa Island.”


March 9, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “On a recent trip from San Miguel Island, the schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, brought a sample of a huge mushroom of edible variety grown on the island. It measured nine and one-half inches in diameter.”


May 9, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, sails this morning for Santa Rosa Island with some workmen and supplies.”


June 17, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless returned from Santa Rosa Island yesterday. She sails for San Miguel Island tomorrow with Captain Waters.”


June 23, 1901 [SBMP]: “The Whitney party expects to leave for Santa Cruz Island on Saturday. They have at their disposal the fine gasoline launch belonging to the Caire estate, in which the party will sail. Mr. Whitney will go with the camp outfit in the Restless, Captain Burtis. The members of the party are: Mr. And Mrs. Frank M. Whitney, the Misses Whitney, McCall, Keating, Spaulding and Rosamund Pierce, Dr. Spaulding, and Messrs. Charles Fernald, Eugene Sheffield and Runston.”


June 24, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, arrived in port from Santa Cruz Island last night.”


July 12, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless arrived this afternoon from Lady’s Harbor, Santa Cruz Island. The Restless has been with the Whitney camping party and came after the mail and provisions. The party will return next Wednesday.”


July 20, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday with Mr. Cook, the new superintendent, and several head of rams for the island range. The new management has recently imported over a hundred head of rams from Arizona for their island.”


July 23, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless, which arrived on Sunday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island, left last evening with another load of bucks for the range.”


July 26, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, returned from Santa Rosa Island last evening.”


July 27, 1901 [SBDI]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, sailed this morning for San Nicolas Island for the purpose of bringing to Santa Barbara a large gang of Chinamen who have been engaged in abalone fishing.”


July 30, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless sailed last evening with a load of Chinese and white men to fish for abalones on the island.”


July 30, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless sailed last evening with a load of Chinese and white men to fish for abalones on the island.”


August 2, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island. Robert Fulton returned with her. Mr. Fulton had been on the island several days.”


September 27, 1901 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless is engaged in overhauling the buoys at the wharf. Some time ago two of the big buoys there went adrift. Two new ones of Port Harford cedar will be moored in their places.”


October 19, 1901 [SBI]: “The Restless sailed today with a sheep shearing crew for Santa Rosa Island. A number of shearers arrived this morning from the San Julian rancho where the fall shearing has just been completed.”


October 21, 1901 [SBI]: “The schooner Restless left Saturday for Santa Cruz Island with a party of men, women and children, who will engage in shell-picking. All went plentifully provided with food and blankets and went into camp in one of the remote parts of the island where shells are plentiful.”


October 21, 1901 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless sailed yesterday for Santa Rosa Island with a large number of sheep shearers, who had been brought down from the San Julian ranch, where the season’s work has been finished.”


November 23, 1901 [SBMP]: “Beach scenery at Santa Rosa Island. Captain Frank Thompson’s latest painting, a bit of rough beach scenery in Convoy Cove, Santa Rosa Island, is displayed in the window of the Great Wardrobe. The picture is remarkable true to life. The sloping beach lying at the foot of towering cliffs forms the foreground. Half embedded in the sand are the bones of the schooner Convoy, which was lost there some years ago. The almost dismembered bow timbers stand grim and lonely, a fitting adjunct to the wild surroundings. In the middle ground of the picture a heavy surf is pounding the beach, a typical scene at this point a great part of the year. In the background surrounded by the peculiar haze of island coast, is the point at the end of the island. Around the cliffs gulls are winging, and one is perched naturally on the topmost timber of the wreck. The loss of the schooner Convoy occurred not many years ago, and is well remembered by channel navigators. She was a small schooner, a little larger than the Restless, Captain Burtis, which has been plying between this port and Santa Rosa Island for the past two years…”


March 11, 1902 [SBMP]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from San Pedro where she has been in winter quarters.”


March 22, 1902 [SBMP]: “The Restless, Captain Burtis, has returned from San Pedro where she has been in winter quarters.”


April 17, 1902 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless, arriving from San Miguel Island yesterday morning brought the report of the wreck of the sealing schooner, Kate and Anna...”


April 17, 1902 [LAT/SB]:Kate and Anna wrecked. The sealing schooner Kate and Anna was wrecked in Cuyler’s Harbor, on San Miguel Island, the 9th inst. The schooner had put into the harbor to get out of a hard northwest blow. The anchor chain parted, and the vessel was driven on the beach. Captain Lutjers and the crew, six men all told, reached shore in safety by swimming through the breakers, but lost everything. The Kate and Anna filled with sand, and was going to pieces when the schooner Restless sailed yesterday...”


April 17, 1902 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara, April 16. The schooner Restless, arriving today from San Miguel Island, brings news of the wrecking of the sealing schooner Kate and Anna in Cuyler’s Harbor, on the island of San Miguel, on April 9. The schooner had been put into the harbor to escape a hard northwest gale. The anchor chain parted and the vessel was driven on the beach. Captain Lutjens and the crew of six men, reached shore in safety. The Kate and Anna filled with sand and was going to pieces when the Restless sailed yesterday. She was a thirty-ton boat, plying from San Francisco, and owned by Captain Lutjens.”


April 24, 1902 [LAT]: “The schooner Restless left for Santa Cruz Island at noon yesterday with a lot of Chinese, who are employed by the canning company to gather abalones and assist in the cannery.”


May 15, 1902 [SBMP]: “All three of the island schooners were in port yesterday. The Restless brought a cargo of sheep from San Miguel Island.”


May 15, 1902 [LAT/SB]: “The Restless came from San Miguel Island with 100 head of sheep for this city.”


May 17, 1902 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless returned from the islands yesterday with 20 seals for H. A. Rogers.”


May 18, 1902 [LAT/SB]: “Herbert Rogers, who has an order for 100 seals for museums and zoological gardens in the East and in Europe, has invented a new method of catching them that has proved very successful. Heretofore seals have been caught with the lasso, but Mr. Rogers now uses a strong net. As the result of his effort, the schooner Restless returned form the islands yesterday with twenty seals, and will immediately return for the remainder of sixty that have been captured.”


May 25, 1902 [LAT/SB]: “Two cargoes of sheep were landed at the wharf yesterday from San Miguel and Santa Rosa islands, the Restless bringing over 100, and the Mildred E, Prescott, 250. These are for the Los Angeles market.”


July 13, 1902 [LAT/SB]: “The launch Restless arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of guano.”


August 6, 1902 [SBMP]: “The schooner Restless, Captain Burtis, has a party of twenty Carpinteria people out for a ten day cruise about the islands.”


October 24, 1902 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Restless, one of the best boats in the harbor, has been sold to persons at San Pedro.”


October 16, 1903 [SBI]: “There is considerable worriment expressed on the waterfront because of the non-appearance of the schooner Restless, Captain Thorwaldsen, which has been away from here about two months. She left for Santa Barbara Channel Islands, particularly San Nicolas, for a cargo of guano. Since the Restless went away, the Ellen, Captain Osterhaus, has made two trips to the same island, having reached there in only five hours behind the Restless on the first trip. No word has been received from the Restless and she has not been seen so far as known here.—San Diego Union.”


November 5, 1903 [SBI]: “Reports have been received from San Diego stating that the schooner Restless, which left port several weeks ago for a load of guano, which was to have been gathered from the islands of the Santa Barbara channel, is still missing… The schooner Ellen left San Diego in search of the Restless about three weeks ago, but has not returned to report…”


March 7, 1906 [SBMP]: “The sloop Restless sailed yesterday for San Miguel Island in search of sea otter recently seen there. Their hides sell for from $250 to $400.”


February 23, 1909 [LAT/SB]: “Fears for the safety of the power schooner Gussie M, Captain Colice Vasquez, is crew of three and several abalone fishermen, are entertained here. The ship left a week ago for San Nicolas Island, 100 miles to sea, and is now four days overdue. No word has been received from her, and unless the next few hours bring news, a searching expedition will be sent out. The ship is owned by Captain George M. McGuire of this city. It was two years ago that the powerboat Restless sailed from here for San Nicolas Island and was never heard from. The Gussie M may have met the same fate in the storm-tossed waters near the island, which has no safe harbor.”


June 10, 1911 [SBMP]: “...His father [Captain Burtis] was also a sailing master, his old boat, the Restless, being well remembered here...”