SANTA CRUZ ISLAND JAY

Santa Cruz Island Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma insularis)
Painting by Eli W. Blake, Jr., December 1888
SBMNH Channel Islands Archives
Santa Cruz Island jay
Photo by Marla Daily
Santa Cruz Island jays

Santa Cruz Island Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis) was first described by Henshaw in 1886. It is found on Santa Cruz Island, and nowhere else. This jay is a third again as large as its mainland counterpart, and a much brighter blue. In 1920, ornithologist William Leon Dawson wrote:

“There exists upon the Island of Santa Cruz, some 25 miles distant from the mainland at Santa Barbara, a jay which is almost an exact replica of the mainland bird in color and pattern of plumage, but which has undergone certain important modifications of proportion, especially of beak and feet.”


There are at least 35 historic skin specimens in the U.S. National Museum of Natural History:

  • 1875 (4) H. W. Henshaw (one discarded in 1957)
  • 1889 (5) C. H. Townsend, U.S.S. Albatross
  • 1892 (17) Clark P. Streator
  • 1895 (4) Rollo H. Beck
  • 1909 (1) Howard Wright
  • 1911 (1) A. J. van Rossem
  • 1922 (1) Loye Miller
  • 1948 (2) Frank A. Pitelka
  • 1950 (1) Alden Miller


1886 Santa Cruz Island: Eli Whitney Blake, Jr. visited Santa Cruz Island twice in 1886: from July 4-July 24, and again August 6-September 3. During his visits, Blake camped in a canyon near Platt's Harbor. He noted:

Aphelocoma insularis. Island Jay. — By far the commonest land bird of the island, and familiar to the verge of impudence. General habits like those of its near relatives on the mainland. Several nests which must have belonged to this species were placed in trees or bushes between six and thirty feet from the ground. They exhibited no marked peculiarity of construction.


1892 Santa Rosa Island: In July 1892 C. P. Streator, during a visit to Santa Rosa Island, made a notation in his field notes: “ Aphelocoma. Mr. John More informs me that there are jays on the island.” There is no scientific evidence to support the historic presence of jays on Santa Rosa Island.


1897 Santa Cruz Island: “With much interest I read Mr. Jos. Mailliard's article on the birds of Santa Cruz Island in the May-June number of the Bulletin, and finding his experience different from mine in some particulars, I submit a few notes taken principally on the west end of the island in May, 1897... A Flickers ’ nest was seen in a tall dead tree in the bottom of the canon and farther down this canon I found the Santa Cruz Jays nesting. ...”
Beck, R.H. Additional Notes on the Birds of Santa Cruz Island, Cal., 1899


1898 Santa Cruz Island: “...Naturally enough a sight of the Santa Cruz Jay (Aphelocoma insularis) was eagerly desired, but it was some days before one was seen. There were no Jays within a mile or two of this harbor [Scorpion Harbor] but some were found where the first brush commenced on the steep hillsides toward the head of Scorpion Canon. In fact they were quite numerous among the brushy hills but were very difficult to approach, more from the nature of the ground than from their wariness, though they were here comparatively shy. Their harsh notes could be heard on all sides among the bushes, but seldom near enough to shoot. Two were taken at last in the canyon, but all the rest that fell to my lot were captured at La Playa [Main Ranch]. The notes of this Jay are much harsher than those of the California Jay (Aphelocoma californica), the screech being more like that of Cyanocitta stelleri and the bird much larger and of brighter and deeper plumage... The main ranch... In this locality the Santa Cruz Jay was very abundant and bold. Many were shot with the auxiliary barrel, being too close to use a larger charge. In some particular tree these birds would at times be very numerous, flying singly, by twos or threes, and then again hours might pass without a Jay being seen. Every accessible bush and tree within two or three miles of Laplaya [Main Ranch] was carefully searched for their nests, but, while many old ones were discovered, only five were found occupied. Two of these contained eggs, one set of three eggs and one set of four; two contained young, two fledglings in one nest and three in the other, while the fifth nest was placed near the end of a long slim branch of a large live-oak, with no means of reaching it. From the small proportion of new nests to old ones discovered, it would seem that either the birds were not breeding to any extent this year on account of the severe drouth perhaps, or else nests when once built must last in that locality about I00 years before disintegrating... Following is a list of birds observed during my stay:- Santa Cruz Jay (Aphelocoma insularis);... ”
Mailliard, Jos., Spring Notes on the Birds of Santa Cruz Island, Cal., April,1898 The Condor 1(1):41-45, April 1899


1907 Santa Cruz Island:Aphelocoma insularis. Santa Cruz Island Jay. Abundant except on northwestern portion of island. Those seen in the vicinity of Cochas Pietres [Coches Prietos] were nearly all females. In the higher pine region this order was reversed; only two or three females observed.” [“At 11:30 p. m., November 19, 1907, my father (H. Linton), Mr. George Willett, and myself left San Pedro harbor in a dilapidated fishing smack and in company with a crawfisherman, one “Cold-foot” Jorgensen. We arrived off the south end of Santa Cruz Island at 10:30 the following day during a stiff norwester. For various reasons we were unable to make camp until the 22nd. It may not be amiss to state here that twice during the blow we were nearly wrecked: once while at anchor in Potatoe Harbor, a broken anchor allowing the boat to drift within the breaker line and nearly onto the rocks. In this instance the timely arrival of Willett and H. Linton in a small boat, saved the day, and incidentally the fishing smack. At another time (the engine having broken down) we were blown nearly onto the rocks of Anacapa Island; but with father at the wheel and Willett and I on the “sheet” we managed to hold her off. I mention the foregoing, and the many sleepless nights spent on the rocky shores, “running” the surf several times each day (with attendant duckings), etc., merely as a warning to those who seem inclined to believe a field naturalist’s life “strewn with roses”. (Its ’ generally strewn with cacti!)”]
Linton, C. B. Notes from Santa Cruz Island] The Condor 10(3):124-129, May 1908


Streator note, Santa Rosa Island, July 1892






  • 1920. Dawson, W. L. The case of the Santa Cruz Island jay, Aphelocoma insularis Hensh. Journal of the Museum of Comparative Oology 1(3-4):26-29, 1920
[original in SCIF archives; second issue of three, 40 pages]


  • 1951. Pitelka, Frank Alois Speciation and ecologic distribution in American jays of the genus Aphelocoma University of California Pub. Zoology 50:195 464, 1951


  • 1989. Isitt, J. J. Evolution of the Scrub Jay, Aphelocoma coerulescens in the western United States Unpublished M.A. thesis, California State Univ., Long Beach, CA 1989


  • 1994. Collins, C. T. and K. A. Corey Delayed breeding in the Santa Cruz Island Scrub-Jay: Why not be cooperative in The Fourth California Islands Symposium: Update on the Status of Resources, 1994 (p. 371–378). Halverson, W. L. and G. J. Maender, editors. Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Santa Barbara, CA 1994


  • 2005. Delaney, K. S. and R. K. Wayne Adaptive units for conservation: Population distinction and historic extinctions in the Island Scrub-Jay Conservation Biology 19:523–533, 2005




In the News~

April 30, 1897 [Condor 1(1):6]: “Nesting of the Santa Cruz Island Jay. On the 30th day of April, 1897, I was landed on the west end of Santa Cruz Island and for five days busied myself in collecting and caring for the few species of birds found within a few miles of camp. I had been hoping to find the Santa Cruz Jay nesting, but until the forenoon of the 8th of May not a bird had been seen. On that day, after a long walk up the bottom of a canon, the first Jay was seen perched on a dead willow stump a short distance ahead, and was at once laid away in my basket out of the hot sun. A 20 minutes’ search among the bushes and small trees nearby revealed a nest in the thick top of a scrubby oak, on the steep side hill and on a level with my eyes. A careful approach showed the female on the nest where she remained until my hand was but inches from her. She then flew to a tree forty yards off, from which she too was laid away with her mate. The nest contained two eggs and was the counterpart of a California Jay's nest, being composed principally of oak twigs and lined with rootlets. The next day, after a long steep climb over rough hills, a second nest was found near the bottom of a rocky canon in a tangle of bushes. The birds were heard calling on the hill above the nest, which, after a short search, was located. It was similar in construction to the first and contained three eggs. A half mile farther down the canon another nest was found near the end of an oak limb, fifteen feet from the ground and contained two young birds. The location, material and size of this nest was very similar to that of the Blue-fronted Jay in Santa Clara County, Cal., so much so in fact, that I had to tear it slightly to make sure there was no mud in it. The birds were absent when I climbed out to it, and I thought it possible that the Blue-fronted might occur on the Island. A few hundred yards farther a nest was seen in a willow tree near the stream, twelve feet up. The bird remained on until I nearly touched her, when she flew across the stream and called her mate, who came and silently watched me a short distance away. The silence of the Island Jays was very noticeable, and except for their habit of perching in conspicuous places, might have prevented their discovery. Judging from the four nests examined, two or three eggs would seem to be an average set. The eggs are somewhat larger than the average eggs of A. californica. Those obtained measure: (Set ½); 1.21x.85, 1.18x.84. (Set ⅓); 1.15x.90, 1.18x.90, 1.18x.92. (Set ⅔); 1.10x.86, 1.14x.88 1.16x86 inches. The markings are much lighter in color also, being light brown, grayish and lavender. R. H. Beck, Berryessa, Cal., Dec. 24, 1898.”


August 30, 1916 [SBMP]: “One of the most curious facts brought to light by the field work carried out this past season by the staff of the Museum of Comparative Oology is the effect of isolation upon the color of bird’s eggs. Isolation, that is, of the parent birds. Santa Cruz Island has a jay found upon the island only, and not even upon its neighbor, Santa Rosa. It is like the mainland type, our chestless blue jay, from which it undoubtedly spring, save that it is considerably larger and more deeply colored. An extensive series of the eggs of these birds collected this year shows almost absolute uniformity of coloring, whereas the eggs of the mainland bird, well distributed throughout California, are highly varied, and are rated among the handsomest in collections. The differences in the eggs of the mainland bird are so marked that two distinct types or “phases” are recognized - a “red” and a “green.” While the birds of the mainland stock themselves preserve a substantial uniformity of appearance, the great climactic variety of their setting, their environment, has reflected itself in the highly variable coloring of the egg. Diversity of stock, or a considerable development of the tendency to vary, is thus indicated. But the eggs of the Santa Cruz Island blue jay point as plainly to a uniformity of parental stock, to descent, in all probability, from a single pair of bords [birds]. The Santa Cruz Island colony of the crestless blue jay stock is closely inbred, while the mainland stock is highly crossbred. The evidence of the two series of eggs now reposing in the M. C. O. collection is so clear that he who runs may read.”


November 27, 2019 [Ventura Star]: “While its overall population numbers are just around 2,000, the island scrub jay’s impact on the world around it is enormous. By caching thousands of acorns every year, it has helped to restore Santa Cruz Island’s precious oak woodlands. California’s Channel Islands have proven to be a safe haven for a wide array of flora and fauna ever since the chain became a national park in 1980. Over the years, cooperative efforts by the National Park Service, The Nature Conservancy, the Institute for Wildlife Studies and other agencies have managed to bring Channel Islands National Park toward a natural balance. This is seen in the return of several significant avian species, including the peregrine falcon, California brown pelican and bald eagle. All three species were decimated by DDT pesticides but have made remarkable comebacks. Bald eagles, for example, were extinct on the islands for 50 years, leading up to 2002 when the first eaglets were returned to Santa Cruz Island. More eaglets followed through 2006, and after years of intensive efforts there are now roughly 70 bald eagles that have reestablished historic habitat across the national park. In 2019, America’s national bird experienced something of a baby boom: This year there were 19 breeding bald eagle pairs on the islands, producing a total of 24 chicks, with 10 chicks on Santa Cruz Island, nine on Santa Catalina Island, two each on Anacapa and San Clemente Islands, and one on Santa Rosa Island. Isolation has its advantages on the Channel Islands and with protections in place, it’s easy to see conservation at work. Once ranch animals were removed from the volcanic archipelago, much of the islands healed themselves, thus giving island endemics a chance to thrive. Still, more challenges lie ahead. One species of significant ecological importance is the endemic island scrub jay. Santa Cruz Island, the largest, most biodiverse isle off the California coast, is the only place in the world this passerine species exists. The island scrub jay evolved from its mainland cousin, the western scrub jay, thousands of years ago while surrounded by open ocean — first when the northern chain was just one island (named by scientists Santarosae), and ever since, beginning 20,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age. From there, sea levels rose 400 feet and the Northern Channel Islands were created. It wasn’t until 1994, however, that the jay became its own separate species, Aphelocoma insularis. Birders from all over the globe flock to Santa Cruz Island just to get a mere glimpse of the jay, a streak of brilliant blue amongst the island oaks, Bishop pines, manzanita, toyon, lemonade berry and eucalyptus trees. It is typically heard before being seen, with its rattling, guttural, raspy calls filling the rocky canyons, but there is no denying its bright Dodger-blue wings, smoky gray back and creamy white breast. Biologists from The Nature Conservancy, Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Smithsonian Institute are currently in the middle of lengthy research projects involving the island scrub jay, which began in earnest in 2007. Although they’ve made several amazing discoveries about the species and its diversified habitats on Santa Cruz Island, biologists are also finding that there’s still much to learn about one of the rarest birds on the planet. “A fascinating, interesting and ecologically really important bird,” said Scott Sillet, a wildlife biologist for the Smithsonian Institute and its Migratory Bird Center. “There are a lot of unknowns surrounding this bird.” If you spend enough time on any of the islands, it can feel isolated out there, even though the Ventura County mainland is less than 20 miles away, with Los Angeles a mere 60 miles southeast. Yet, Channel Islands National Park is also known as “the Galapagos Islands of the North.” With over 60 endemic species, Santa Cruz Island possesses the greatest number of plant and animal species of all the islands in the park. Thousands of years of isolation on the Channel Islands forced endemic flora and fauna to evolve, with island species becoming larger or smaller (based on competition, diversity of habitats and available food sources) than their mainland counterparts. In the case of the island scrub jay, a natural phenomenon called “gigantism” has allowed it to grow larger by a third, with a beefier beak and a deeper blue color than its mainland counterpart and distant cousin. But it’s not just the isolation of the mountainous, 96-square-mile and 22-mile-long isle. Gigantism is also associated with a lack of predators. Sure, the island scrub jay contends with tree-climbing island foxes (another island endemic) and burly, ruthless ravens, but compared to what the western scrub jay endures on the mainland, the island variety looks over its shoulder far less. Competitively, the island scrub jay has no peers among other songbirds. Island scrub jays are mostly omnivorous, feasting within 10 different plant communities on a healthy variety of insects such as crickets and earwigs, reptiles such as side-blotched and western fence lizards, and even deer mice and other birds’ eggs. There’s a flipside to this isolation game. Even though Santa Cruz Island is the largest isle off the coast, the range of the island scrub jay is described as tiny. Its small population size of roughly 2,000-plus jays makes it vulnerable to natural disasters such as wildfires (most recently the 258-acre blaze in the island’s central valley in April 2018). Even more worrisome is disease, such as the West Nile Virus. The mosquito-carrying virus has been well-documented on the mainland, but as far as anyone knows, it has never touched down on the Northern Channel Islands. Due to these factors, the island scrub jay is listed as “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (ICUN). Over the last seven years, a number of jays have been trapped and vaccinated, but the practice is labor intensive. “It harkens back to Wile E. Coyote and the Roadrunner,” said Sillet, referring to the classic Looney Tunes cartoons. “A peanut, string, stick and a box. If you like to fish, you’ll like to catch jays.” “They’re hard to catch, really smart and they don’t want to get poked twice,” said Scott Morrison, director of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) of California Conservation and Science Programs. “So there’s limitations on vaccinations. There’s a lot of field work involved. We could prepare to bring them into captivity.”

Trapping occurs a few times annually. Blood and measurements are taken, as are swabs from beaks extracted to check for disease. It’s about a 15- minute checkup. Some jays are fitted with GPS and radio tags. On neighboring Santa Rosa Island, several miles to the west of Santa Cruz Island, there is evidence of island scrub jays dating back to the late 1800s. Any effort to reestablish a population on Santa Rosa, the second largest isle off the California coast, would require a thorough study of the current population, its role in the food chain and how much food is available for them to thrive. The last population survey took place in 2008.

“At the moment we’re pretty confident that West Nile has not yet established itself on the island with residents and migrants,” continued Morrison. “Some birds have been tested. Some mosquitoes tested, but it’s a matter of when and not if.” I couldn’t make out what the jay was searching for. The cavity of an old, downed, bleached-out eucalyptus tree was captivating an island scrub jay. It was too busy thoroughly probing the cavity, so it didn’t mind me observing from just a few feet away.

After much probing, it finally emerged with its prize: an empty, nondescript snail shell. Then it proceeded to pin it down on the trunk of the tree and pummeled it open with its beak, extracting anything remotely nourishing from the vacant shell.

“They’ll cache anything,” said Sillet. “They don’t become satiated during caching mode. They put as much food away as they can to get through a winter.”

That includes island cherries and, more importantly, acorns from island oak trees. Santa Cruz Island possesses extensive island oak groves because island scrub jays are responsible for enhancing those groves on the craggy isle.

Contrast this with Santa Rosa Island, where the extent of oak groves is reduced, due to a combination of island scrub jays going extinct during the late 1800s and, possibly, cattle grazing up until the late 1980s. On this windswept isle, topsoil has been blown away by perpetual northwest winds.

Sillet said that the soil of island oak groves on Soledad Peak at 1,574 feet, the location of a cloud forest restoration site located in the middle of Santa Rosa Island, is so badly eroded that the exposed root systems of the oak groves resemble those of mangrove trees in the tropics.

It’s estimated that a single, mature island scrub jay caches somewhere between 3,500 to 6,500 acorns per year on Santa Cruz Island. The birds have the innate ability to immediately cache the ballistic-shaped acorns with their points down to generate growth in a dark, shady place. The embryo of the acorn is near the point. All that caching of acorns on Santa Cruz has reestablished its oak groves, especially following the eradication of thousands of ranch animals (sheep, pigs, cattle and horses) that ran amuck across the island’s rolling marine terraces, tranquil Central Valley and steep, rocky canyons.

Volunteers have tried to replicate on Soledad at Santa Rosa Island how jays disperse acorns on Santa Cruz. During one restoration project, 3,000 acorns were planted. It took 600 volunteer hours to perform the equivalent work of just one island scrub jay.

“I like to think their role is restoring oak woodlands,” said Morrison of the jays. “They’re ecosystem engineers and they have prolific memories. Pretty phenomenal recovery of vegetation on Santa Cruz Island and the jays have had a hand in it.”

The jay’s manner is scattering seeds virtually everywhere, efficiently distributing acorns across the island, and in particular moving seeds upslope. The number one water input on the islands is fog, so when acorns are planted upslope, the fog sweeps over the islands and the moisture catches in the leaves of the island oaks. From there it trickles into the ground and eventually the creeks. This is a much-needed remedy at places like Soledad Peak.

“This all gives communities a head-start on climate change,” continued Morrison. “I’m a big believer in a whole bunch of species benefit on the island.””



Island Collections~

NOTE: The Santa Cruz Island Jay is the most collected bird on Santa Cruz Island, with more than 650 specimens in institutional collections. By 1950 at least 44 men had collected Jay specimens. Frank Pitelka alone collected at least 35 Santa Cruz Island jays.

Pre-1950 Jay collectors include:



ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Cruz Island (not listed) CHAS December 20, 1870 CHAS-15877 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Henshaw NMNH June 11, 1875 USNM-72542 Aphelocoma insularis TYPES Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Henshaw NMNH June 11, 1875 USNM-72543 Aphelocoma insularis TYPES Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Henshaw NMNH June 11, 1875 USNM-79695 Aphelocoma insularis TYPES Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend NMNH February 6, 1889 USNM-117650 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend NMNH February 6, 1889 USNM-117651 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend NMNH February 6, 1889 USNM-117652 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend NMNH February 6, 1889 USNM-117656 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend NMNH February 7, 1889 USNM-117655 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. H. Townsend [?] AMNH February 9, 1889 AMNH-49944 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139607 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139608 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139609 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139610 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139611 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-142136 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139614 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139612 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139613 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 15, 1892 USNM-139615 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 16, 1892 USNM-139616 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 16, 1892 USNM-139617 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-142137 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139618 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139619 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139620 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139621 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island (not listed) MCZ June 8, 1895 MCZ-331470 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck MVZ June 8, 1895 MVZ-107224 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck NMNH June 8, 1895 USNM-150930 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck NMNH June 8, 1895 USNM-150931 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck NMNH June 8, 1895 USNM-150932 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck NMNH June 8, 1895 USNM-150933 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island (not listed) DMNH May 8, 1897 DMNH-6577 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island (not listed) UWYMV May 10, 1897 UWYMV-636 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Beck AMNH May 10, 1897 AMNH-13802 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard MVZ April 14, 1898 MVZ-102974 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 17, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63818 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 22, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63819 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 23, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63820 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 23, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63821 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard & J. W. Mailliard CUMV April 23, 1898 CUMV-10567 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard & J. W. Mailliard CUMV April 23, 1898 CUMV-10568 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard & J. W. Mailliard CUMV April 23, 1898 CUMV-10569 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard & J. W. Mailliard CUMV April 23, 1898 CUMV-10570 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 24, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63822 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. Mailliard CMNH April 24, 1898 Carnegie MNH-63823 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island (not listed) ROM April 24, 1898 ROM-50364 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33792 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33792 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33793 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33794 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33795 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33796 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33797 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 1, 1903 MVZ-33798 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 3, 1903 MVZ-33799 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Joseph Grinnell MVZ September 3, 1903 MVZ-33800 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island O. W. Howard WFVZ April 29, 1906 WFVZ-183690 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton & George Willett LACM November 20, 1907 LACM-7402 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 20, 1907 LACM-22435 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 20, 1907 LACM-22437 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 20, 1907 LACM-22438 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton DMNH November 22, 1907 DMNH-42367 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett ROM November 23, 1907 ROM-87492 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 23, 1907 LACM-7400 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton & George Willett LACM November 23, 1907 LACM-7413 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 23, 1907 LACM-22439 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 23, 1907 LACM-22441 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island George Willett DMNS November 24, 1907 DMNS-5711 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett ROM November 25, 1907 ROM-87491 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton & George Willett DMNS November 27, 1907 DMNS-5710 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton & George Willett LACM November 28, 1907 LACM-7404 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton LACM November 29, 1907 LACM-7408 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 29, 1907 LACM-22440 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island G. Willett & C. B. Linton LACM November 29, 1907 LACM-22442 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton ROM November 29, 1907 ROM-22.4.20.444 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton KU December 1, 1907 KU-25643 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton KU December 12, 1907 KU-25644 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton CAS December 14, 1907 CAS-35513 Aphelocoma insularis insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton CAS December 14, 1907 CAS-48347 Aphelocoma insularis insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton LACM December 14, 1907 LACM-7399 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton LACM December 14, 1907 LACM-7415 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton CAS December 15, 1907 CAS-35514 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton DMNH December 15, 1907 DMNH-6581 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton LACM December 15, 1907 LACM-7407 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. B. Linton LACM October 15, 1908 LACM-7401 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Howard Wright NMNH August 9, 1909 USNM-417008 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright NMNH August 9, 1909 USNM-417008 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77489 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77490 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77491 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77492 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77493 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS August 9, 1909 CAS-77494 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright UCLA August 9, 1909 UCLA-10092 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island none A. B. Howell CCBER April 25, 1911 CCBER-2809 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island none A. B. Howell (?) CMNH April 25, 1911 Carnegie MNH-162912 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH April 25, 1911 Carnegie MNH-163941 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH April 25, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99953 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA April 25, 1911 UCLA-7463 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA April 25, 1911 UCLA-7464 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell WFVZ April 27, 1911 WFVZ-35996 Aphelocoma Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH April 28, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99954 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH April 28, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99955 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell MCZ April 28, 1911 MCZ-151571 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA April 28, 1911 UCLA-7469 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA April 28, 1911 UCLA-7470 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. J. Van Rossem NMNH April 29, 1911 USNM-590957 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. J. Van Rossem YPM April 29, 1911 YPM-002226 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH April 30, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99956 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell MVZ April 30, 1911 MVZ-102975 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA April 30, 1911 UCLA-7471 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH May 1, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99957 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH May 1, 1911 Carnegie MNH-99958 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell CMNH May 1, 1911 Carnegie MNH-163942 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA May 1, 1911 UCLA-7472 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. B. Howell UCLA May 1, 1911 UCLA-7473 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. S. Rowley Jr. CAS July 1, 1911 CAS-18169 Aphelocoma insularis insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CAS July 7, 1912 CAS-77488 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. W. Wright CUMV n.d. CUMV-10570 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. E. Law DMNH June 5, 1914 DMNH-6580 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson DMNS April 5, 1915 DMNS-4269 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson WFVZ April 5, 1915 WFVZ-34621 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson WFVZ April 5, 1915 WFVZ-64423 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson MVZ April 6, 1915 MVZ-6306 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 6, 1915 SBMNH-24709 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 7, 1915 SBMNH-24710 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 7, 1915 SBMNH-24711 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson PSM April 20, 1915 PSM-15475 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island A. G. Vrooman SBMNH March 25, 1916 SBMNH-24712 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. T. Truesdale SBMNH March 25, 1916 SBMNH-24713 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH March 26, 1919 SBMNH-24723 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. T. Truesdale MVZ March 27, 1916 MVZ-6305 Aphelocoma californica californica Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. T. Truesdale SBMNH March 27, 1916 SBMNH-24714 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. T. Truesdale SBMNH March 27, 1916 SBMNH-24715 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. T. Truesdale SBMNH March 27, 1916 SBMNH-24716 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island A. G. Vrooman SBMNH March 27, 1916 SBMNH-24717 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island A. G. Vrooman SBMNH March 29, 1916 SBMNH-24718 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH March 28, 1917 SBMNH-24719 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ March 30, 1917 WFVZ-179211 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 2, 1917 SBMNH-24711 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 2, 1917 SBMNH-24720 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 2, 1917 WFVZ-82016 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. A. Hornung LSU 1917 LSU-41106 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 12, 1918 SBMNH-24721 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ April 14, 1918 WFVZ-86011 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson PSM April 20, 1915 PSM-15307 Aphelocoma californica californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson OSUM March 19, 1916 OSUM-1626 Aphelocoma californica californica Birds
Santa Cruz Island W. L. Dawson SBMNH April 15, 1918 SBMNH-24722 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 16, 1918 WFVZ-13800 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 22, 1918 WFVZ-15313 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 22, 1918 WFVZ-15314 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 22, 1918 WFVZ-183686 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. A. Hornung LSU 1918 LSU-41107 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. A. Hornung WFVZ November 28, 1918 WFVZ-4053 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH March 26, 1919 SBMNH-24723 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 3, 1919 WFVZ-144151 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 17, 1919 WFVZ-15311 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 1, 1922 WFVZ-15310 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 7, 1922 SBMNH-24724 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 7, 1922 WFVZ-15312 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 7, 1922 WFVZ-15315 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 7, 1922 WFVZ-15316 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 7, 1922 WFVZ-183685 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 7, 1922 WFVZ-183689 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 8, 1922 SBMNH-24725 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 8, 1922 SBMNH-24726 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury WFVZ April 11, 1922 WFVZ-179210 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 13, 1922 SBMNH-24727 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island R. H. Canterbury SBMNH April 14, 1922 SBMNH-24728 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island Loye Miller NMNH August 18, 1922 USNM-417007 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island A. H. Miller MVZ August 19, 1922 MVZ-81351 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ March 29, 1927 WFVZ-61225 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. R. Pemberton WFVZ March 29, 1927 WFVZ-3463 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ March 30, 1927 WFVZ-82015 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. R. Pemberton WFVZ April 5, 1927 WFVZ-3464 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot PSM April 5, 1927 PSM-15476 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ April 5, 1927 WFVZ-58566 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ April 5, 1927 WFVZ-61223 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ April 5, 1927 WFVZ-61224 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 14, 1931 MVZ-58406 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 14, 1931 MVZ-58407 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 14, 1931 MVZ-58408 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 14, 1931 MVZ-58409 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 14, 1931 MVZ-58410 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island H. H. Sheldon MVZ April 18, 1931 MVZ-58411 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island L. T. Stevens SBMNH April 3, 1932 SBMNH-24729 Aphelocoma insularis Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ April 4, 1932 WFVZ-58565 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ April 7, 1932 WFVZ-82017 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island D. S. DeGroot WFVZ May 3, 1932 WFVZ-69478 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger UF March 31, 1935 UF-88257 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ March 31, 1935 WFVZ-82020 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ March 31, 1935 WFVZ-82021 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. M. Peet UMMZ November 4, 1935 UMMZ-83264 Aphelocoma coreulescens insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 18, 1937 WFVZ-13274 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 18, 1937 WFVZ-13275 Aphelocoma coerulescens Birds
Santa Cruz Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 18, 1937 WFVZ-24718 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island J. S. Rowley Jr. WFVZ April 18, 1937 WFVZ-49045 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ April 21, 1937 WFVZ-82018 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island M. C. Badger WFVZ April 21, 1937 WFVZ-82019 Aphelocoma coerulescens Eggs
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 29, 1948 MVZ-115981 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 29, 1948 MVZ-115982 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 30, 1948 MVZ-115997 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 30, 1948 MVZ-115998 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 30, 1948 MVZ-115999 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ August 31, 1948 MVZ-115983 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island K. Racey UBCBBM September 1, 1948 UBCBBM-CTC B002946 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 2, 1948 MVZ-116000 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 2, 1948 MVZ-116001 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island K. Racey UBCBBM September 4, 1948 UBCBBM-CTC B002947 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka NMNH September 4, 1948 USNM-424074 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116003 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116004 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116005 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116006 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116007 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 4, 1948 MVZ-116008 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 6, 1948 MVZ-115984 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 6, 1948 MVZ-116009 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 6, 1948 MVZ-116010 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 6, 1948 MVZ-116011 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 7, 1948 MVZ-115985 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 7, 1948 MVZ-115986 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 7, 1948 MVZ-115994 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 7, 1948 MVZ-115995 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 7, 1948 MVZ-115996 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 9, 1948 MVZ-115987 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka NMNH September 11, 1948 USNM-424073 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 11, 1948 MVZ-116002 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 12, 1948 MVZ-115988 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 12, 1948 MVZ-115989 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 12, 1948 MVZ-115990 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 13, 1948 MVZ-115991 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 13, 1948 MVZ-115992 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island F. A. Pitelka MVZ September 13, 1948 MVZ-115993 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Alden Miller MVZ March 5, 1950 MVZ-120140 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Alden Miller MVZ March 7, 1950 MVZ-120139 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Alden Miller MVZ March 11, 1950 MVZ-120141 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island Alden Miller NMNH March 11, 1950 USNM-424072 Apheocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island D. M. Power ROM June 23, 1969 ROM-104793 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Bird
Santa Cruz Island D. M. Power ROM June 23, 1969 ROM-104794 Aphelocoma coerulescens insularis Bird