SHERMAN, Charles Edmond

From Islapedia

SHERMAN, Charles Edmond (1836-1907), Iowa-born businessman who arrived in Santa Barbara in 1869 with his bride, Cecilia Savitz of Pennsylvania. With help from her brother, Sherman set himself up in the meat business, partnering with Canadian-born William Ealand. In 1870, Sherman and Ealand built a slaughter house in Sycamore Canyon, and in 1872 they opened a meat market business as well. At on epoint they had four retail stores in addition to their large wholesale business. The Sherman and Ealand families were neighbors at 625 and 621 Chapala Street, and their partnership lasted almost until their respective deaths two weeks apart in 1907. Sherman served as a member of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce, as a city councilman for one term, and as Santa Barbara County sheriff from 1800-1882.

Sherman died at his home at 625 Chapala Street on April 16, 1907. He is buried in Santa Barbara Cemetery. Sherman left one son, George Sherman, who ran the California Market.



In the News~

November 12, 1884 [SBDI]: “Superior Court Notes. L. W. More vs. C. E. Sherman et al.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDP]: “The steamer Santa Maria yesterday morning took from Santa Cruz Island a band of sheep being shipped to San Francisco by Sherman & Ealand. Mr. Sherman accompanied the shipment.”


July 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “C. E. Sherman, of Sherman & Ealand, went to the islands yesterday on business.”


June 8, 1895 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara, Cal., June 7. — C. E. Sherman of this place, appointed by the Superior Court to examine the condition of cattle and sheep on Santa Rosa Island, being one vast holding of the estate of the late A. P. More, today rendered his report. Sherman states that Administrator John F. More, a brother of the deceased, and the lessee of the island, threw every possible obstacle in the way of his examination, and not until May of this year did he succeed in visiting the island and making an investigation. He found 25,000 sheep, one-fifth scabby, poor and showing great neglect. There were only 1200 of this year's lambs, whereas with proper care, there should have been fully 10,000. Three hundred and twenty-five sacks of this year's clip of wool and the clip of last fall was so co-mingled with the property of John F. More as to render impossible a separate account. The fences about the wharf were in good condition, but the fence across the island, which should have been built according to contract, has not been constructed. Sherman said that it was impossible to make a proper examination of the great island, as all horses there are under the direct control of John F. More, who refused to let him use them. More, according to the report, forced Sherman to sleep with Chinese and sheepherders on a mattress made of jute sacks with old wool sacks for bedding. The 1523 cattle on the island were the roughest band Sherman ever saw in thirty years' experience as a cattleman. There were 155 horses, mules and colts, the greater part useless and valueless through careless breeding and handling. The report indicates great degeneracy in the condition of affairs in the short time since A.P. More's death.”


June 23, 1895 [LAT]: “C. E. Sherman has made his report to Judge Coffey of the condition of affairs on Santa Rosa Island in the Santa Barbara channel... He informs the court that the island is in a state of neglect and that there are about 100,000 sheep missing; also, that the cattle have not been properly cared for.”


May 10, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “An outcome of the examination of Expert Sherman before Judge Coffey, a week ago, in the matter of the estate of Alexander P. More, is a complaint which will be filed Monday in the Superior Court, against John F, More, administrator of the estate. Albert W. More, John C. More and Helen W. Rowe, heirs at law, wish to have John More removed from the place. He is charged with having made way with 15,000 sheep and 500 head of cattle and with having sold $26,000 worth of cattle without making an accounting. The estate consists of the land on Santa Rosa Island and the stock thereon, worth originally $880,000. The heirs accuse More of paying to himself $35,000 without any consideration, and with selling property of the estate to laborers and appropriating the proceeds.”


May 30, 1895 [SBDI]: “Mr. C. E. Sherman returned last evening on the schooner Santa Rosa from Santa Rosa Island where he has been taking stock of sheep there.”


May 30, 1895 [SBDI]: “The slaughterhouse belonging to Sherman & Ealand recently destroyed by fire has been rebuilt and is now in full operation.”


June 23, 1895 [LAT]: “C. E. Sherman has made his report to Judge Coffey of the condition of affairs on Santa Rosa Island in the Santa Barbara channel. The island belongs to the estate of A. P. More, and is in charge of administrator John F. More, who is also one of the heirs. Sherman was appointed by the court to inspect the island and the personal property thereon. He reports that he was treated shamefully by the administrator. The administrator tried to prevent him from getting on the island, but after he reached it he was badly treated. He was given a dirty bed in the Chinese quarter, but preferred to sleep in the open air. He was refused a horse to ride over the island and was compelled to travel around on foot. Other petty annoyances were inflicted so as to make his stay unpleasant. He informs the court that the island is in a state of neglect and that there are about 100,000 sheep missing; also, that the cattle have not been properly cared for.”


September 23, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “There is talk of a building being erected on the corner of State and Ortega streets where the butcher shop of Sherman & Ealand stands.”


April 29, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “C. A. Storke left on last night’s steamer for San Francisco, where he will appear in a case involving the A. P. More estate. C. Sherman accompanied him as a witness. They will be absent about ten days.”


May 10, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “An outcome of the examination of Expert Sherman before Judge Coffey, a week ago, in the matter of the estate of Alexander P. More, is a complaint which will be filed Monday in the Superior Court, against John F, More, administrator of the estate. Albert W. More, John C. More and Helen W. Rowe, heirs at law, wish to have John More removed from the place. He is charged with having made way with 15,000 sheep and 500 head of cattle and with having sold $26,000 worth of cattle without making an accounting. The estate consists of the land on Santa Rosa Island and the stock thereon, worth originally $880,000. The heirs accuse More of paying to himself $35,000 without any consideration, and with selling property of the estate to laborers and appropriating the proceeds.”


March 19, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The funeral of the late Mrs. Sherman, wife of Charles H. Sherman, of Arlington Heights, will be held Sunday afternoon from the residence. Mrs. Sherman died recently in San Francisco.”


July 6, 1899 [SBDI]: “Mr. Charles E. Sherman will leave in a few days for the islands to superintend the loading of some sheep that he has purchased.”


July 28, 1899 [SBDI]: “Charles Sherman returned from Santa Cruz Island this afternoon.”


July 29, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “C. E. Sherman returned at noon today from Santa Cruz Island, bringing over a cargo of 250 sheep. He says that the 35,000 sheep on this island, as well as the thousands on the other Channel Islands, are in the very best possible condition. Of the 80,000 to 100,000 sheep in the county, these seem to be in the very best shape.”


July 29, 1899 [SBMP]: “Charles Sherman returned yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


January 18, 1900 [SBDI]: “Mr. C. E. Sherman returned last night from a business trip to Los Angeles.”


January 27, 1900 [SBDI]: “Mr. Charles E. Sherman will leave tomorrow for Gaviota. He intends to purchase a large number of cattle in that locality.”


February 10, 1900 [SBDI]: “Mr. C. E. Sherman purchased 3000 head of sheep last night from Mr. Caire of the Santa Cruz Island.”


March 21, 1900 [SBDI]: ”Mr. C. E. Sherman left last night for Santa Cruz Island. He will bring back a number of sheep.”


March 22, 1900 [SBDI]: ”Mr. C. E. Sherman returned last night from the islands with a consignment of sheep and lambs for the market.”


March 29, 1900 [SBDI]: ”Mr. C. E. Sherman left this morning for Santa Cruz Island to purchase sheep for the market.”


April 16, 1900 [SBDI]: “Mr. C. E. Sherman returned last night from the islands where he had been for the past week in search of cattle for the market. He brought back nine head. He stated that he would have been back sooner had it not been for the terrific wind that was blowing.”


May 8, 1900 [SBDI]: “The funeral of the late Caleb Sherman will take place Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from the residence of Mr. C. E. Sherman on Chapala Street.”


August 25, 1901 [SBMP]: “The monster turtle captured by fishermen a few days ago was on exhibition at yesterday at C. E. Sherman’s meat market. Many visitors viewed the curiosity. Dr. L. G. Yates will mount it for Sebastian Larco.”



Sherman & Ealand' was a well-known butcher business and meat market in the late 19th and early 20th centuries which procured meat for over 30 years, both beef and sheep, from various Channel Islands. Partners Charles E. Sherman (1836-1907) and William Ealand (1843-1907) supplied beef, pork, mutton, homemade sausage, corned beef, and salt pork from their Sherman & Ealand Meat Market located at 646 State Street. William Ealand lived at 621 Chapala Street, and Charles Sherman lived at 625 Chapala Street. They were partners and neighbors for over 35 years, and they died in their respective homes two weeks apart in April, 1907.


In the News~

June 3, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom, Matinee, and Vision were the only vessels in port this morning. The Star of Freedom came over from the islands last night, bringing a few sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 15, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Matinee came over from San Miguel Island last night, with 150 sheep for Sherman.”


July 16, 1876 [SBDP]: “Messrs. Sherman and Ealand are building themselves residences on Chapala Street near Ortega. They are very handsome cottages, and far advanced toward completion.”


August 11, 1876 [SBDP]: “Arrived. Schooner Matinee, Thompson, master, twenty hours from Cuyler’s Harbor, with wreckage and crew of schooner Leader, lost June 17th on San Miguel Island. Also, 32 barrels seal oil to Joe Shields, and 90 sheep to Sherman & Ealand.”


January 2, 1877 [SBDP]: “Beit Randolph, a man in the employ of Sherman & Ealand, was killed on Saturday by being thrown from his horse while driving cattle into the slaughterhouse.”


October 25, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Surprise from San Nicolas Island loaded with sheep and shells arrived this morning. The sheep are for Sherman & Ealand. The schooner Alma, from San Nicolas, loaded with sheep for Sherman & Ealand arrived last night.”


November 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “The government steamer McArthur and schooner Star of Freedom were riding at anchor in the harbor today.”


February 10, 1882 [SBDP]: “Messrs. I. K. Fisher and Sherman & Ealand will not in future keep their markets open at any hour on Sundays.”


February 24, 1885 [SBDP]:Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of eighty fine sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands last night bringing a cargo of fine fat sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDP]: “The steamer Santa Maria yesterday morning took from Santa Cruz Island a band of sheep being shipped to San Francisco by Sherman & Ealand. Mr. Sherman accompanied the shipment.”


December 14, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Angel Dolly came over from San Miguel Island yesterday with 130 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


1886 Santa Barbara Directory: “Sherman & Ealand. Corner State and Ortega streets. Wholesale and retail butchers, Santa Barbara, Cal.”


March 2, 1887 [SBDP]: “Sherman & Ealand have put up a new sign with a very natural looking picture of their slaughterhouse in Sycamore Canyon painted on it. The work was done by Judd.”


1888: According to the New Directory of the City of Santa Barbara, Sherman & Ealand Meat market was at 644 State Street.


April 23, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom yesterday brought 110 sheep from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman and Ealand.”


April 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island with 110 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 2, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz with 150 sheep, most of them for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Tuesday night from Santa Cruz Island with 109 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and about 30 sheep shearers.”


May 12, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 22, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought over from the island today 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand, and ninety for L. Carteri.”


May 23, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island. She brought 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand, and 90 for L. Carteri.”


June 14, 1888 [SBDI]: “Sherman & Ealand have been awarded the contract for supplying the United States troops in camp here, with fresh meat, during the summer.”


June 18, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 180 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and L. Carteri from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


July 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom discharged 75 sheep on the wharf for Sherman & Ealand yesterday morning. She arrived from Santa Cruz Island Sunday afternoon.”


July 12, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island last Tuesday evening with 174 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and L. Carteri.”


October 20, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 85 sheep Thursday evening for Sherman & Ealand.”


October 25, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Tuesday night with 133 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and Leon Carteri.”


November 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 100 sheep Thursday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman & Ealand.”


December 18, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Sunday evening from Santa Cruz Island with 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 4, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 18, 1889 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Wednesday night with 138 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 18, 1889 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 170 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 3, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island last Saturday evening with 170 head of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


November 30, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 1, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a load of 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 16, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 7, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with 145 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and Fisher & Co.”


June 7, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island. On her last trip to this city Friday, she brought 154 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 11, 1893 [SBMP]: “The sloop Liberty came in yesterday from San Miguel Island with 56 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 11, 1893 [SBDI]: “The consignment of sheep brought over from the island yesterday in the steamer, Santa Cruz, was for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 16, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Santa Cruz naphtha boat arrived from the island yesterday with a lot of sheep for Sherman & Ealand. One of the animals got overboard and made things quite lively.”


May 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz landed 150 sheep at the wharf yesterday for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 26, 1894 [SBMP]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz brought over 157 head of sheep for Sherman & Ealand yesterday from Santa Cruz.”


May 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island yesterday with over 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 19, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty came over from San Miguel Island with a cargo of fifty sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 30, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 200 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty arrived this morning from San Miguel Island with sixty-one sheep for Sherman & Ealand. She will return to the island tomorrow.”


July 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “C. E. Sherman, of Sherman & Ealand, went to the islands yesterday on business.”


July 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner, Santa Cruz, returned from the island this afternoon with a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 13, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 110 sheep for Sherman & Ealand. Mr. Sherman came with the load.”


July 14, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 19, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty arrived in this port from San Miguel Island yesterday afternoon, bringing over a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 28, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in last night from the islands with 149 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 13, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty arrived from San Miguel Island yesterday with a cargo of sixty sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 24, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Liberty arrived last night from San Miguel Island with about sixty sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 4, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty sailed for San Miguel Island today after a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty arrived this morning from San Miguel Island with sixty-five sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 19, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty arrived last night from San Miguel Island with fifty-nine sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The sloop Liberty came in last night from San Miguel Island with a load of wool for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 22, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Ellis’s schooner arrived in port from San Miguel Island on Sunday morning, bringing 274 sheep consigned to Sherman & Ealand. She reports that another earthquake shock was felt on the island on April 17. She expects to sail for the island again at noon on Monday.”


May 25, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived last night from Santa Cruz Island with 191 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 19, 1895 [SBDI]: “Sherman and Ealand will put in scales on Ortega Street.”


March 30, 1899 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme arrived from San Miguel Island yesterday morning with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 31, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The junk Acme has arrived from the islands with a cargo of sheep consigned to Sherman & Ealand.”


April 7, 1899 [SBMP]: “Junk Acme arrived from San Miguel Island night before last loaded with 147 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 7, 1899 [SBMP]: “Junk Acme arrived from San Miguel Island night before last loaded with 147 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 15, 1899 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme sailed yesterday for San Miguel Island and will return in a few days loaded with sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 18, 1899 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme arrived yesterday from San Miguel Island with 76 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 17, 1900 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned from the islands Sunday night with a cargo of beef cattle for Sherman & Ealand which she discharged.”


April 21, 1900 [SBDI]: “The schooner Dawn is expected to arrive from the islands tomorrow with sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 12, 1900 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme came in yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 21, 1900 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme, arriving from Santa Rosa Island on Thursday evening with sheep for Sherman & Ealand, will leave for the other side of the channel today.”


July 27, 1900 [SBDI]: “A Chinese junk [Acme] that has been anchored in the channel for the past few days, left for Santa Rosa Island this morning, and will return in short time with a cargo of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 1, 1900 [SBDI]: “The junk Acme will arrive from the islands in a few days with 200 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


August 12, 1900 [SBMP]: “The junk Acme, Captain Valdez, arrived from the islands yesterday afternoon with 150 head of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 23, 1901 [SBMP]: “A cargo of sheep arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 7, 1903 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz arrived from the island yesterday with a cargo of 215 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “Sheep shearers return. The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain James Prescott, came in from Prisoners’ Harbor at 1 o’clock yesterday afternoon and discharged a crew of 20 sheep shearers, who have been employed on the island for several weeks. The boat also brought over 120 sheep for Sherman’s meat markets, and unloaded several barrels of wine for the local trade.”


November 29, 1905 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz returned to Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning after unloading a string of cattle at this port for Sherman & Ealand. The cattle were thrown overboard and forced to swim ashore.”


December 3, 1905 [SBMP]: “The steam schooner Santa Cruz came in yesterday morning with twelve head of cattle for Sherman & Ealand. The stock was unloaded east of Stearn’s Wharf, being thrown overboard and forced to swim ashore.”


May 29, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz, Captain James Prescott, came in from Prisoners’ Harbor at 10 o’clock yesterday afternoon and discharged a crew of 20 sheep shearers who have been employed on the island for several weeks. The boat also brought over 120 sheep for Sherman’s meat markets, and unloaded several barrels of wine for the local trade.”


June 10, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner came in port yesterday from Prisoners' Harbor in charge of Captain James Prescott. She carried 140 sheep for William [? Charles] Sherman's market, and a cargo of wine for the local trade.”


June 20, 1906 [SBMP]: “The Santa Cruz Island schooner brought over 179 head of sheep from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman's meat market. The boat will return to Prisoners' Harbor tomorrow.”


June 24, 1906 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Cruz came in from Prisoners' Harbor yesterday morning with over 100 head of sheep. Large numbers of sheep have been brought from Santa Cruz Island this month for Sherman’s meat market. The pasturage on the island this year has been very good and the sheep are in fine condition.”