STREATOR, Clark Perkins

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Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, CA

STREATOR, Clark Perkins (1866-1952), Ohio-born life-long ornithologist, naturalist and taxidermist who visited San Miguel Island aboard the Ocean King in June of 1886 after receiving permission from the island’s owner, W. H. Mills. Streator described both Flea Island [Castle Rock] and its adjacent Gull Island. He also visited San Nicolas Island in October 1886.

Streator was an active member in the Santa Barbara Society of Natural History, and was described in 1890 as “our young fellow member” who has made many extensive ornithological collections in Jamaica, and other West India Islands, and in British Columbia. During the spring and summer of 1892, under the auspices of the Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture, Streator visited and collected on several islands. His field notes from these trips, and many of his collections are in the United States National Museum.

In 1899 Streator was persuaded by his friend, Walter E. Bryant, to work at the California Academy of Sciences, which he did until C. Hart Merriam gave Streator a job in the Division of Birds and Mammals at the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The October 1931 Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Leaflet reported “a visit from Mr. C. P. Streator of Santa Cruz, who collected and mounted birds in Santa Barbara in 1885 and 1886.”

Streator = [1896] Ida Jane Lehman (1872-1923) of Ashcroft, British Columbia

  • 1. Nelson Lehman Streator (1899-1970) [SS#548-46-9897]
  • 2. Albert Charles Streator (1901-1960) [SS#552-14-7019]
  • 3. Victor M. Streator (1904-1938) suicide at age 33

Ida Streator was killed in 1923 in an accident near San Luis Obispo, California. Clark Streator died in Santa Cruz, California on November 28, 1952 at the age of 84. He is buried in Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, CA.


Streator collected on:

BAJA CALIFORNIA ISLANDS


» Streator, C. P. The Water Birds of San Miguel Island Santa Barbara Society of Natural History 1:1(21-23), 1887

» Streator, C. P. Notes on the Birds of the Santa Barbara Islands Ornithologists and Oologists 13:52-53, 1888

» Streator, C. P. Birds. Santa Rosa Island California July 1 to 3, 1892. Unpublished field notes. 1892. Smithsonian Institution Archives. Record Unit 7176, USFWS, 1860-1961, Field Reports, Box 42, folder 1;

» Streator, C. P. Birds. Santa Cruz Island California July 9 to 20 1892. Unpublished field notes. 1892. Smithsonian Institution Archives. Record Unit 7176, USFWS, 1860-1961, Field Reports, Box 42, folder 1. [CAS portrait/WFVZ]



Island Collections~
SAN MIGUEL ISLAND

6/24,26,27/1892 NMNH herps

ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 23, 1892 USNM-139943 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 23, 1892 USNM-139944 Sturnella neglecta Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34627 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34628 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34629 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34630 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34631 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34632 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34633 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34634 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34635 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-34845 Urocyon littoralis littoralis streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-139194 Carpodacus mexicanus clementis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-139398 Sturnella neglecta Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-139945 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 24, 1892 USNM-139946 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34636 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34637 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34638 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34639 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34640 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34641 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34642 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34643 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34644 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-34846 Urocyon littoralis littoralis streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 25, 1892 USNM-139947 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34645 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34646 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34647 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34648 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34649 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34650 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-34651 Peromyscus maniculatus streatori Mammals
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-139948 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-139949 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 26, 1892 USNM-139950 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139195 Carpodacus mexicanus clementis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139196 Carpodacus mexicanus clementis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139197 Carpodacus mexicanus clementis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139198 Carpodacus mexicanus clementis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139399 Sturnella neglecta Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139951 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 27, 1892 USNM-139952 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 28, 1892 USNM-139953 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 28, 1892 USNM-139954 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds
San Miguel Island C. P. Streator NMNH June 28, 1892 USNM-136809 Salpinctes obsoletus obsoletus Birds


SANTA CATALINA ISLAND

4/10,11,14/1892 NMNH herps

ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH nd USNM-33224 Urocyon littoralis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 11, 1892 USNM-33211 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 11, 1892 USNM-33213 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 11, 1892 USNM-33214 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 11, 1892 USNM-33384 Vermivora celata sordida Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 12, 1892 USNM-33215 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 12, 1892 USNM-33216 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 12, 1892 USNM-33218 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 12, 1892 USNM-33384 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33220 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33221 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33385 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33386 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33387 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33388 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33389 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 13, 1892 USNM-33390 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 14, 1892 USNM-33379 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 14, 1892 USNM-33391 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator USNM April 14, 1892 USNM-33223 Urocyon littoralis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 14, 1892 USNM-33391 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 14, 1892 USNM-33392 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 14, 1892 USNM-33393 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33394 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33395 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33396 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33397 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33398 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33399 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 15, 1892 USNM-33400 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 16, 1892 USNM-33401 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 16, 1892 USNM-33402 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 16, 1892 USNM-33403 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 16, 1892 USNM-33404 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 16, 1892 USNM-33405 Reithrodontomys megalotis catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 18, 1892 USNM-34680 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 18, 1892 USNM-34682 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 19, 1892 USNM-136702 Thryomanes bewickii catalinae Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 19, 1892 USNM-140911 Callipepla californica catalinensis Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 20, 1892 USNM-34683 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 21, 1892 USNM-33509 Otospermophilus beecheyi nesioticus Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 21, 1892 USNM-33510 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 21, 1892 USNM-33511 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 22, 1892 USNM-140324 Selasphorus sasin sedentarius Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 22, 1892 USNM-140325 Selasphorus sasin sedentarius Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 22, 1892 USNM-33512 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 22, 1892 USNM-33513 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 23, 1892 USNM-33514 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 25, 1892 USNM-33515 Peromyscus maniculatus catalinae Mammals
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 25, 1892 USNM-136703 Thryomanes bewickii catalinae Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 25, 1892 USNM-136714 Thryomanes bewickii catalinae Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 25, 1892 USNM-141641 Thryomanes bewickii catalinae Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 26, 1892 USNM-136963 Mimus polyglottos leucopterus Birds
Santa Catalina Island C. P. Streator NMNH April 26, 1892 USNM-139471 Corvus corax sinuatus Birds


SANTA CRUZ ISLAND

7/9,14,15,16,18/1892 NMNH birds

7/10/1892 NMNH herps

7/12/1892 NMNH mammals (foxes)


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139607 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139608 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139609 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139610 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 9, 1892 USNM-139611 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 11, 1892 USNM-34852 Urocyon littoralis santacruzaea Mammals
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 11, 1892 USNM-34853 Urocyon littoralis santacruzaea Mammals
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 11, 1892 USNM-136707 Thryomanes bewickii nesophilus Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 11, 1892 USNM-136708 Thryomanes bewickii nesophilus Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 12, 1892 USNM-34854 Urocyon littoralis santacruzaea Mammals
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 12, 1892 USNM-136711 Thryomanes bewickii nesophilus Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 13, 1892 USNM-34855 Spilogale gracilis amphiala Mammals
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 13, 1892 USNM-140079 Empidonax difficilis insulicola Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-142136 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139612 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139613 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 14, 1892 USNM-139614 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 15, 1892 USNM-139615 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 16, 1892 USNM-139616 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 16, 1892 USNM-139617 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 16, 1892 USNM-140080 Empidonax difficilis insulicola Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-142137 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139618 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139619 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139620 Aphelocoma insularis Birds
Santa Cruz Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 18, 1892 USNM-139621 Aphelocoma insularis Birds


SANTA ROSA ISLAND

7/2/1892 NMNH herps


ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 2, 1892 USNM-34847 Urocyon littoralis santarosae Mammals
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 2, 1892 USNM-34848 Urocyon littoralis santarosae Mammals
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 2, 1892 USNM-34849 Urocyon littoralis santarosae Mammals
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 2, 1892 USNM-34850 Urocyon littoralis santarosae Mammals
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 2, 1892 USNM-137893 Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi Birds
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 3, 1892 USNM-34851 Urocyon littoralis santarosae Mammals
Santa Rosa Island C. P. Streator NMNH July 3, 1892 USNM-139955 Eremophila alpestris insularis Birds


ISLA GUADALUPE
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-136819 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-136820 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-136821 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-136822 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-136823 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-139241 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-139242 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-139243 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-141616 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-141617 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 16, 1892 USNM-141876 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 20, 1892 USNM-136824 Salpinctes obsoletus guadeloupensis Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-141417 Puffinus puffinus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-141418 Puffinus puffinus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-34082 Mus musculus domesticus Mammals
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-34083 Mus musculus domesticus Mammals
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-34084 Mus musculus domesticus Mammals
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 22, 1892 USNM-34085 Mus musculus domesticus Mammals
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 23, 1892 USNM-139240 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 25, 1892 USNM-139239 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 25, 1892 USNM-141646 Thryomanes bewickii brevicauda Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 25, 1892 USNM-141647 Thryomanes bewickii brevicauda Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 26, 1892 USNM-139235 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 26, 1892 USNM-139236 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 26, 1892 USNM-139237 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 26, 1892 USNM-139238 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds
Isla Guadalupe C. P. Streator NMNH May 26, 1892 USNM-141877 Carpodacus mexicanus amplus Birds




In the News~

October 30, 1884 [SBMP]: “Society of Natural History...Mrs. J. W. Cooper and Mr. Clark P. Streator were elected members, and Hugh D. Vail was proposed for membership.”


September 10, 1885 [SBMP]: “Clark Streator, the taxidermist, is today putting in place a new ceiling high show case at his place of business near the Morris House.”


1886 Santa Barbara Directory: “Taxidermists. Streator, Clark. State Street near Morris House.”


January 14, 1886 [SBMP]: “Mr. Clark Streatorhas on ehhibit at his room near the Morris House a gigantic female golden eagle, Aquila chryseatus canadensis. This monstrous bird, the largest ever seen on this coast, was killed by Mr. S. G. Kelly near the apiary of Judge Hatch, on the San Marcos ranch. This species of eagle is the kind that carries off young children in many parts of the old countries, and judging from the size of this one, it could carry off quite a large child.”


March 15, 1886 [SBDP]: “Clark Streator, taxidermist, Fred Forbush and Captain Lord left in the Rosita this morning for a relic hunting expedition to the islands.”


May 6, 1886 [SBMP]: “Clark Streator, the taxidermist, has himself gathered within a radius of four miles from Santa Barbara, and mounted, specimens of two hundred different species of birds. The habitat of so many birds being here places a feather in Santa Barbara's cap.”


June 5, 1886 [SBDI]: “Mr. Streator answered some questions about birds and gave some interesting items respecting a rare bird whose eggs had only recently been collected.”


June 14, 1886 [SBMP]: “Mr. T. M. Lewis, of Sunny Bank rancho on the Goleta road brought in a large California condor this morning, measuring nine feet and one inch from tip to tip. The monster was shot yesterday, is a handsome specimen, and is now in the hands of Clark Streator, the taxidermist.”


June 22, 1886 [SBDI]: “Clark Streator goes to San Miguel Island Saturday [aboard Ocean King] to be gone a month. During his stay he will devote his time to collecting curios as well as rare birds and marine animals. The island is said to be alive with foxes and they roam with perfect security, sure of being unmolested.”


June 25, 1886 [SBDP]: “Clark Streator, the taxidermist, leaves tomorrow for a month’s hunt on San Miguel Island.”


July 24, 1886 [SBDI]: “Clark Streator has returned from San Miguel Island with an abundance of souvenirs for the winter’s trade.”


July 24, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King made the round trip to San Miguel Island including stoppage of two hours at the above place [to pick up Clark Streator], in 36 hours, which we consider good time.”


July 27, 1886 [SBDI]: “Captain Burtis, not long since, picked up at sea a curious looking marine animal, resembling a snail in form, and in size it is about as large as a half-gallon measure. No one as yet who has seen the animal has been able to name it, strange as it may seem. During Mr. Burtis’ thirteen years at sea he has never before seen anything like it. At present it is in the hands of Clark Streator, but we understand it is to be donated to the Natural History Society.”


August 2, 1886 [SBMP]: “Clark Streator read the following account of a visit to San Miguel Island: The Water Birds of San Miguel Island, Situated about sixty miles from west of Santa Barbara is the island of San Miguel which lies farthest west of the Santa Barbara group. The island is owned by Mr. W. H. Mills of San Francisco, and through the kindness of the gentleman I was permitted to go there to make a collection of birds that frequent the locality. We left Santa Barbara on the Ocean King and after a fair wind we reached the island in about twenty-four hours. On approaching the island the view is not very inviting, the cliffs rising two or three hundred feet, between which descend ever shifting banks of sand. By following a steep trail to the mesa we observe a fine pasture almost as far as the eye extends, but on reaching other parts of the Island I found it barren and half of the area drifting sand. It altogether contains 13,000 acres and is stocked with the choicest horses, cattle and sheep. At one time the Island was densely populated with Indians which is well proven by the shell heaps that cover hundreds of acres and in some places to the depth of ten feet or more. One day as I was climbing around a point of rocks I discovered a cave and upon entering I found the bottom covered with human bones but as it was very dark and hot having matches I then abandoned the search, but two or three days after, in company with Mr. Crawford, who has charge of the Island. I again visited it and with the aid of a candle found the roof to be covered with beautiful crystals of sulphate of lime but the cave was not to extensive as we had at first supposed. On coming out to the edge of a cliff we saw a great number of the Uria Columba, Pigeon Guillemots, flying in and out of a still larger cave in a position near by but very difficult of access. Fortunately the tide was low and no waves beating against the sides of the cliffs, and there being many crevices in the rocks that assisted us in climbing, we soon found our way into the cave. The birds were yet breeding and scores of them were flying in and out when we entered, but we were lucky enough to secure half a dozen specimens of the birds and a dozen and a half of their eggs. They seemed to prefer the darkest parts of the cave for their nests where we could not see without the aid of a candle. The examination was hurried we fearing that the tide would rise and shut us in. There are very few birds that breed on the main Island, as a little fox, about the size of a house cat, abounds and destroys their eggs. When the breeding season arrives they repair to two small islands of about ten acres each in extent and situated about a mile from the main Island, one of which is called Gull Island and the other Flea Island. We visited both and found that by far the greater number breed upon Gull Island. Upon approaching, the birds began flying over out boat before we landed and no sooner had I fired my gun than thousands upon thousands flew into the air and the noise they made was almost deafening. It was one of the most wonderful sights I have ever seen, the sun being obscured from view, and the thousands of young ones that were scrambling to get out of the way only helped to make the sight more interesting. We did not loose much time, however, in getting on the highest point of the Island where we found plenty of fresh eggs of the cormorants, of which we collected quite a quantity. The following is a list of birds as I observed them upon this Island:

  • Halmatopus Niger, Black Oystercatcher; not very common;
  • Larus occidentalis, Western Gull; very common;
  • Larus heermanni, Heerman's Gull; common;
  • Phalacrocorax penicillatus, Brandt's cormorant; breeds almost in countless numbers;
  • Phalacrocorax dilophus, double-breasted cormorants; breeds common but not so abundantly as the last species;
  • Phalacrocorax violaecus, violet-green cormorant; not very common;
  • Lunda cirrhata, tufted puffin, breeds in large numbers and is one of the most interesting birds found on the island;
  • Uria Columba, Pigeon Guillemot, breeds quite common in the caves just above the tides.

I also found two other species of birds which I am unable to class. They will be forwarded to Dr. Elliott Cowes for identification. I also saw on the south side of the main Island, young of the Pelionetta perspicillata, the surf duck, which satisfies me that they breed here. My stay on the Island was of about twenty-five days, so I feel quite confident that few birds, if any, escaped my notice that breed here. I hope to again visit the Island next year, before the birds are so far advanced in breeding, as I am confident that I could make many notes of interest. Clark P. Streator”


August 2, 1886 [SBDI]: “The water birds of San Miguel Island by Clark P. Streator. Situated about sixty miles west of Santa Barbara is the island of San Miguel which lies farthest west of the Santa Barbara group. The island is owned by Mr. W. H. Mills of San Francisco, and through the kindness of the gentleman I was permitted to go there to make a collection of birds that frequent the locality. We left Santa Barbara on the Ocean King and after a fair wind we reached the island in about twenty-four hours…”


October 16, 1886 [SBDI]: “Sloop Ocean King arrived this morning, two days out from San Nicolas Island with 60 sacks of wool for Mr. Elliott. Clark Streator, who came over on the boat, says the adverse winds delayed them several hours.”


October 18, 1886 [SBDI]: “From a gentleman who has lately returned from a visit to San Nicolas Island, we learn that there are eagles that inhabit this isolated territory, something strange, from the fact that they were never before known (going as far back as the migration of the untutored savages) to exist there. They are unusually wild and build their eyries among the cliffs in secluded places. It is said of Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz islands however, that the eagle is common, and destructive to lambs at certain seasons.”


November 9, 1886 [SBDI]: “Natural History Society… Clark Streator, our young naturalist, entertained us with an account of his recent exploring trip on San Miguel Island, the President expressing a desire to have it for publication. Mr. Streator said he would present it in proper form for next month.”


March 16, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Clark P. Streator, of the United States Bureau of Agriculture of Washington, D.C., is in the city.”


May 2, 1892 [SBDI]: “Clark P. Streator, Assistant Ornithologist, U.S. Department of Agriculture, is in town. He will be here off and on for the next six weeks as he is under orders to ‘work up’ the Channel Islands birds.”


May 5, 1892 [SBMP]: “Clark Streator left for San Diego on the teamer last evening. Mr. Streator will join an expedition to Lower California, in the interest of the department of agriculture, of which he is an assistant ornithologist. He will return to Santa Barbara.”


June 3, 1892 [SBDI]: “Clark Streator, the naturalist, arrived in town last evening on the train and is registered at the Commercial Hotel. Mr. Streator has just returned from working up Guadalupe Island, Mexico. He found specimens of the sea elephant, a marine mammal about double the size of the seal, and supposed to be extinct. Mr. Streator will now spend some time in working up the birds of Santa Barbara Islands.”


June 11, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Parties to the islands for a few days recreation are becoming quite a thing. On Saturday another party of eight went over to where Mr. Ray and his friends are. These were Mr. Wallace Baily and his wife, Mr. Penfield and wife, Miss Winnie Humphrey, Miss Mable Hutchinson, E. J. Portens and Clark Streator, the bird and bug man. They went over in Captain Burtis’ boat, the Lottie.”


July 1, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Liberty arrived from San Miguel Island Wednesday night, bringing Captain Waters, W. I. Cummings, special government inspector, and Clark Streator, the ornithologist. Mr. Streator found about twenty specimens of a rare species of the mouse family, and several other specimens. He will leave shortly for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 1, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed for the islands yesterday afternoon. Clark P. Streator, Assistant Ornithologist United States Department of Agriculture, was a passenger. He was going over there to secure some specimens and information. The sloop Liberty came in from San Miguel Island yesterday evening bringing as passengers Captain Waters, Clark P. Streator and W. T. Cummings, special Chinese inspector.”


July 7, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Clark Streator, an employee of the government, has returned from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 11, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Parties to the islands for a few days recreation are becoming quite a thing. On Saturday another party of eight went over to where Mr. Ray and his friends are. These were Mr. Wallace Baily and his wife, Mr. Penfield and wife, Miss Winnie Humphrey, Miss Mabel Hutchinson, E. J. Portens and Clark Streator, the bird and bug man. They went over in Captain Burtis’ boat, the Lottie.”


1900: “During the spring and summer of 1892, Mr. Clark P. Streator, under the auspices of the Biological Survey of the Department of Agriculture, made a small collection of birds upon the Santa Barbara Islands, California. Of these specimens, which are now in the United States National Museum as part of the Biological Survey collection, the writer [Harry C. Oberholser] has been able, through the kindness of Dr. C. Hart Merriam, to prepare the subjoined list. The new forms obtained by Mr. Streator have already been described... The islands visited by Mr. Streator, with inclusive dates of his collecting, are as follows: Santa Catalina Island April 9 to 29; San Miguel Island June 24 to 29; Santa Rosa Island July 1 to 3; Santa Cruz Island July 9 to 20.” [Proceedings U.S. National Museum, Vol. XXII No. 1196, p. 229.]


April 9, 1023 [SLO Daily Telegram]: “Mrs. C. P. Streator of Santa Cruz, injured in an auto accident Friday, died today at San Luis Obispo sanitarium of the injuries. Mrs. Streator was riding in a truck driven by her husband, which turned over near the top of the Cuesta grade. The Streators were on a camping trip when the accident happened. The body will be shipped to Oakland for cremation. R. F. Richardson is in charge of the funeral.”


April 10, 1930 [Santa Cruz Evening News]: “S.C. Expressman takes vacation from carrying trunks to attend meeting of scientists in L.A. Life as an express man is not as dull as it might appear—at least not if it has the colorful background of experiences that Clark. P. Streator, and express man of this city, has had. Few men in any walk of life can draw their chairs before an open fireplace after a vigorous day's work at the age of sixty-three, and call forth an endless stream of living pictures such as his life has been filled with. Early travels. His life, before he settled in Santa Cruz 34 years ago, was spent in traveling and collecting bird and animal specimens for individuals and the government, in natural science work. Illness finally forced him to give up this work, and he chose Santa Cruz as the most desirable homesite in the 46 states he had traveled over. Although he has been engaged in transfer work during the residence here, in addition to raising a family, he has not lost interest not contact with those who are engaged in his chosen work. To attend club meeting. Mr. Streator left Santa Cruz today for Los Angeles to attend the annual meeting of the Cooper Ornithological Club April 11, 12 and 13 and will leave early in May for the east coast, where he will remain until late in June. This second trip will be made to attend the national convention of the Society of American Mammologists, which will be held in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, beginning May 21 and continuing for several days. One of the most important objectives of this meeting will be to educate the public wisely and conserve the natural wildlife. During this trip he will pass through the only two states in the Union which he has not as yet visited, Florida and South Dakota. Interesting maps. Among his interesting collections, Mr. Streator has some maps outlining his travels back and forth as well as up and down the United States, indicating the routes he has followed which resemble a huge spider web. He has also traveled extensively in Alaska, Western Canada, Old Mexico and West Indies. Native of Ohio. Ohio was Mr. Streator's home until he was 16. At that age he set out for California alone. He came to Santa Barbara to live with his brother and accumulated enough money to establish a taxidermy shop which he operated for two years. After leaving Santa Barbara he worked at mounting and collecting specimens in San Francisco, Portland, Oregon, Portage county, Ohio, and the West Indies where he nearly lost his life with a tropical disease. Not long after returning to New York City, he left for British Columbia where he collected about 1,000 bird and mammal skins in one season. It was here that Mr. Streator met and married his wife. As winter drew near, he returned to San Francisco where he worked for the California Academy of Sciences. Employed in U.S. Dept. Dr. Merrian, head of the biological survey of the United States department of agriculture, employed him next, where he remained six years. This was the last work of this kind that Mr. Streator has engaged in. During that time he rose to the position of assistant ornithologist of the department and then to field naturalist. Large collection. Mr. Streator has collected some 2000 birds and 6000 mammals. Among these, 55 species and subspecies, or one thirtieth of all the North American mammals were described as new to science, which makes Mr. Streator discoverer of that many mammals and birds. Several of these have been permanently named after him such as the Scirurus Hudsonicus Streator, a squirrel commonly known as the Streator squirrel. This animal is found in eastern Washington and south-central British Columbia. A large number of these specimens have been used as models from which descriptions have been made for official classification and some mounted as specimens in the National Museum. Dines with Roosevelt. Perhaps most unique among the events of his life, was the priviledge, that most persons would cherish in memory, to dine with the then head of the U.S. civil service commission, Theodore Roosevelt; to discuss work they were similarly engaged in, to predict that he, (Mr. Roosevelt) might be president of the United States some day, and to then see that prediction come true. He once happened to have an appointment for lunch with the same man that Roosevelt had a like appointment with and since they were all interested in the same work, each one accomplished what he had come for. Following Mr. Streator's return from this meeting, he visited his brother, the late George Jason Streator of this sity. They were both admirers of Roosevelt long before he was elected president and at the time of the visit, Clark Streator remarked to his brother that, "It wouldn't surprise me at all to see Roosevelt elected president some day." Little can cause the casual observer surmise that memories are passing through Mr. Streator's mind as he rolls a barrel down the loading plank into his truck or while he displays his jolly Irish grin as he balances a 200-pound trunk on his broad shoulders.”


December 10, 1943 [Santa Cruz Sentinel]: “A Santa Cruzan whose knowledge of birds and mammals has won him international recognition continues his work as a way of 'staying young' although he is in his 78th year. He is Clark P. Streator, and despite his age he is actively engaged in collecting skins of birds and mammals for the University of California. His collections at the present time include 165 mammal skins, and of his collection of 1075 bird skins, 435 are already in the hands of the university. The skins not already sent to the university are at his home here at 299 Otis Street [Santa Cruz, CA]. Streator has no idea how many thousands of miles he has traveled on the North American continent and in the West Indies in his work as a naturalist, but he believes the combined mileage would encircle the globe several times. He has visited every state in the union and has been in Alaska, Canada and Mexico on various expeditions. He served in the U.S. Biological Survey for almost six years as field agent, assistant ornithologist and field naturalist before settling down in Santa Cruz many years ago. He is officially credited with discovery of 66 types of mammals not then known to science, and six of these have been named for him. Coming to California as a lad of 17, in 1883 to join his brother in Santa Barbara, Streator saved $100 and opened a taxidermy shop there. In 1888 he went to the West Indies as a naturalist on an expedition for Charles Corey, wealthy Boston ornithologist, but Streator's work there was terminated when he almost lost his life from a tropical disease. In 1889 he went to British Columbia for the American Museum of New York, collecting about a thousand bird specimens and 114 mammals. The following year he spent seven months at the Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. He joined the U.S. Biological Survey in 1890, and went to Idaho on a field expedition under Vernon Bailey, chief field collector. Streator recalls that he is now the only one left alive of the members of that expedition. He was a personal friend of the late Dr. C. Hart Merriam, famous former chief of the biological survey, and through him, in 1890, Streator had lunch with Theodore Roosevelt, who was then head of the U.S. Civil Service commission. In Washington, Streator saw the inauguration of President Harrison, and four years later of President Harrison, and four years later of President Cleveland. He recalls working in Washington in those years in association with some of the best known scientists of the day. One of his most interesting and fruitful expeditions was in 1891, down the entire length of the Rio Grande from Eagle Pass, Oregon , to Laredo, Texas and thence into Monterrey and Mexico City. In the spring of 1892 Streator made an expedition into the Cascades in the state of Washington, traversing the glacier country and down Skagat River in a canoe with Indian guides to Lake Cushman. In later years he headed an expedition to the Guadaloupe islands in the West Indies [Guadalupe Island, Mexico] to investigate fur seals and secure specimens of sea elephants. Streator says that in recent years the sea elephants have come back to the Santa Barbara islands in the Pacific and now are seen occasionally off the California coast. These gigantic mammals weigh several tons, and Streator says the 'old man of the sea' that has been seen in Monterey Bay probably was a sea elephant. Streator was married in 1896 in British Columbia. He gave up his travels because of health reasons, and settled in Santa Cruz where he was engaged in the transfer business for forty years. During all this time, however, he kept up interest in his work as a naturalist. He retired from the transfer business in 1937, but for the past seven years has collected specimens for the University of California. One room in his home is devoted to boxes of specimens and shelves of books and pamphlets dealing with his favorite topic. The specimens must be kept from the light, he explains, for if the plumage of a bird fades, it is of no value to science. He is a member of numerous national societies and organizations devoted to natural history, and is a charter member of some of them. As a tribute to his work he has received, gratis, all publications of the Smithsonian Institute during the past five years. Streator is a walking encyclopedia of the birds and animals of the Santa Cruz area, and has gone on observation hikes and showed his collection numerous times to groups of interested students.”