Santa Rosa (schooner)

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Schooner Santa Rosa sailing from Santa Rosa loaded with island Sheep, 1896
oil on canvas, 20” x 32” from the Collection of Perry Gwynne More Austin Jr., M. D., and Camilla Austin Andrews.


Santa Rosa (#115660) (1879-1899), 61.2-foot wooden island support schooner built in Oregon and used by the Mores during part of the time they owned Santa Rosa Island. The schooner Santa Rosa, along with Star of Freedom of Santa Cruz Island, were described in 1884 as

“the galleons of the pastoral kings who rule those islands domains. Their treasures are wool, pelts, tallow, sheep, and among their duties are the carriage of men and provisions to and from Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz and adjoining islands.”

They were back and forth between the islands, Santa Barbara and San Francisco all through the year, and they helped in servicing each other’s islands as well. On November 24, 1899 Santa Rosa was pushed by high seas onto the beach at Cuyler's Harbor on San Miguel Island. She was replaced by Vail & Vickers with their new schooner Santa Rosa Island in 1903. Her captains included:



In the News~

April 22, 1879 [SBDP]: “The new schooner Santa Rosa with a sheep shearing outfit sailed from More’s Landing this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


April 26, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


April 28, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last evening from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 7, 1879 [SBDN]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday, and are lying at anchor in the harbor today.”


May 9, 1879 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


May 19, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa from Santa Rosa Island, arrived this morning.”


May 20, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Surprise and Santa Rosa and the McArthur are in the harbor today. The Santa Rosa is being painted and will remain in the harbor for a few days.”


May 26, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island today.”


July 23, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed from More’s Landing to Santa Rosa Island today.”


August 14, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island last night.”


August 19, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed today for Santa Rosa Island.”


August 25, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Lindbridge, arrived Saturday with the crew of the schooner Prescott. The Prescott, under command of Captain Fox, was on her way from San Francisco to San Pedro with a load of railroad ties on August 16 when during a heavy fog she went ashore on San Miguel Island.”


August 25, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands last Saturday evening with the crew of the wrecked schooner Prescott, of San Francisco, on board.”


September 3, 1879 (SBDP): “The schooner Santa Rosa goes to San Miguel Island tomorrow to wreck the schooner [G.W.] Prescott that went ashore on that island two weeks ago.”


September 15, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has arrived from the islands with H. H. More aboard. She will take on a couple heavy anchors for use in getting the schooner Prescott, ashore on San Miguel Island, and sail for the scene of the wreck shortly.”


September 22, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from San Miguel Island on Saturday evening.”


September 23, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, belonging to the More Brothers, has gone to Santa Rosa Island to load with wool for More’s Landing.”


October 1, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from the islands.”


October 6, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and N. B. are in the harbor.”


November 4, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for More’s Landing yesterday afternoon.”


November 20, 1879 [SBDP]: “On Wednesday of last week the schooner Santa Rosa, belonging to the More Brothers, narrowly escaped being wrecked during the gale which prevailed outside of the islands. She parted her chain cable and was rapidly drifting onto the rocks, but sail was got on her in time to enable her to beat off shore and keep away for More’s Landing.”


November 20, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Nidever brothers came over from the islands on the Santa Rosa, and returned to the hunting grounds in their little boats.”


November 29, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom, Santa Rosa and Surprise and the steamer McArthur are at anchor in the harbor.”


December 1, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left here yesterday morning for More’s Landing, from which place she will take a load of supplies to Santa Rosa Island.”


December 23, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and Surprise are at the anchorage.”


January 12, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Santa Rosa came in yesterday from Santa Rosa Island, and returned again this morning.”


April 30, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, arrived here Thursday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island, and has been lying in the harbor since that time.”


May 7, 1881 [SBWP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, arrived here last Thursday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island and has been lying in the harbor since that time.”


May 14, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 18, 1881 [SBDP]: “A. P. More and C. F. McGlashan, editor of the Press, went over to Santa Rosa Island yesterday in the schooner Santa Rosa. They will be absent about three days.”


May 21, 1881 [SBDP]: The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Frank W. Thompson, arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon with A. P. More and party.”


July 15, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Mills [?], arrived from Santa Rosa Island last night, and is now lying in the harbor.”


July 16, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, sailed for Santa Cruz today for a cargo of lumber.”


October 26, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, arrived this morning from the Island.”


October 26, 1881 [SBDP]: “Four schooners are in the harbor, the Star of Freedom, Convoy, Surprise, and Santa Rosa.”


July 22, 1882 [SBDP]: “Captain Thompson, commanding the schooner Santa Rosa, met with a severe accident ten or twelve days ago. He was crossing the deck when his foot got caught in a rope, and he fell, injuring his hip severely. He has been confined to his bed ever since, but is now considered to be improving.”


February 16, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned to her moorings near the wharf last evening.”


March 12, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Santa Rosa has just returned from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 9, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is anchored at the wharf, having arrived from Santa Rosa Island last Sunday evening. She brought a number of sheep shearers over.”


June 1, 1883 [SBDI]: “The Santa Rosa schooner came in this morning with a lot of sheep shearers from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 4, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday.”


June 5, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is back from Santa Rosa Island.”


November 19, 1883 [SFMC]: “…The little schooner Santa Rosa, registering thirty-one tons, arrived in port from Santa Barbara a few days ago. She is in command of Captain H[arry] Higgins, and plies between Santa Rosa Island and the mainland, and comes up to this city [San Francisco] twice a year to secure provisions, clothing, lumber, etc. for use on the island...”


November 21, 1883 [LAT]: “An extensive sheep range on Santa Rosa Island. How eighty thousand sheep are readily and thoroughly washed twice a year—a herd of trained goats. The little schooner Santa Rosa, registering thirty-one tons, arrived in port from Santa Barbara a few days ago…” [from SFMC November 19, 1883]


December 14, 1883 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom has gone to Santa Cruz Island for orders. Captain Frank Thompson has resigned his commission and will engage in business in San Francisco. Captain Harry Higgins takes command. Captain Burgess takes the schooner Santa Rosa.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “On account of the prevailing sou’easter yesterday afternoon, the Santa Rosa made a run over to Prisoners’ Harbor.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and the Star of Freedom, and sloop Ocean King are still at the islands.”


February 23, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa set sail today for More’s Landing, where she will take a cargo of asphaltum for San Francisco.”


April 13, 1884 [DAC]: “Arrived. April 12. Schooner Santa Rosa, [Captain] Burtis, 3 days from Santa Rosa Island; 45 tons asphaltum to J. H. Congdon.”


May 9, 1884 [SBDI]: “A party of 15 Chinamen were shipped in two parties this morning for the islands of Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa by the schooner Santa Rosa. They are abalone fishermen and have with them a complete outfit for a long stay on the islands. They use long flat bottom boats, like the sharpie of the New England coast, save that it is steered by a clumsy Oriental-looking sweep tied to the stern instead of the ordinary oar or rudder.”


May 15, 1884 [SBDP]: “Arrived yesterday May 14, the yacht Santa Rosa, from Santa Rosa Island via Santa Cruz Island, vessel and cargo commanded by Captain Sam Burtis Jr., having on board Mr. A. P. More and General R. H. Chittenden. The latter gentleman has for a week been enjoying the hospitality of Santa Rosa Island, the guest of its owner, Mr. A. P. More.”


May 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa, and the sloop Ocean King are all lying at the wharf.”


May 26, 1884 [SBDI]: “The two schooners, Santa Rosa and Angel Dolly, went out on a fishing excursion yesterday, carrying a crowd of ladies and gentlemen, who enjoyed the trip immensely.”


May 26, 1884 [SBDP]: “A large party of excursionists from the city yesterday spent the afternoon in sailing in the channel in the schooner Santa Rosa. The usual accompaniment of such pleasure trips slightly marred the equilibrium of several of the party, but it was ‘only a slight faintness.’ And all returned delighted with the sail.”


July 1, 1884 [SBWP]: Yesterday, Sunday morning as the schooner Santa Rosa was about to leave the wharf at Santa Rosa Island, an altercation took place between Mr. A. P. More and a Chinaman by the name of Ah You, who had been employed on the island as a cook for about 16 months... Mr. More refused to let him go aboard the schooner. The Chinaman persisted in attempting to force his way on the boat, when a dispute arose which ended in the drawing of weapons and resulted in Mr. More’s shooting the Chinaman through the head with a pistol, inflicting a fatal wound...”


July 7, 1884 [SBDP]: “…Harry Higgins, formerly captain of the schooner Santa Rosa, testified that he had been in More’s employ prior to December 2, 1883; he was discharged at that time…”


November 12, 1884 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in our harbor yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with one hundred head of fine sheep on board consigned to I. K. Fisher.”


January 5, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa goes to More’s Wharf in a day or two to load asphaltum for the San Francisco market.”


January 5, 1885 [SBDI]: “Heroism displayed. Santa Rosa’s adventurous and stormy trip. Our harbor never looked prettier with her four schooners and several otter boats, with flags and streamers floated lazily through the soft zephyrs, than she did yesterday morning… We jumped into a small row boat that conveyed us to the Santa Rosa, the property of A. P. More of this city. On boarding the vessel we were were greeted by the captain in a cordial manner, who was pleased at our coming aboard. In a few words, Mr. Orderhof, the Master, related his recent adventurous trip. One week ago yesterday, while lying in the stream at San San Francisco, he received orders from Mr. More to set sail for Santa Rosa Island, with a cargo amounting in all to forty-five tons… The sailors aboard owing to the strong gale that was blowing at the time, together with the boat being loaded top heavy, did not like the idea of venturing out during the stormy weather, and fear prevailed among the crew, but the Captain, assuring them that he would pilot them through safely, dispelled the fear that at first existed. Long before the Heads were reached, it was plainly to be seen that their undertaking was a perilous one, for the bar which they had to cross was one mass of white caps, indicating that the waters were troublesome… For thirty-two consecutive hours the Captain never relinquished his hold upon the wheel, and all he had taken during that period to sustain life was a little coffee. Had not the crew been lashed to the ship, they certainly would have been drowned…”


March 14, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in port.”


March 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed today for Santa Rosa Island with a number of sheep shearers.”


March 17, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left this morning for Santa Rosa Island with thirty-five sheep shearers on board, who will be engaged for the next few weeks in shearing sheep.”


March 27, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over yesterday from Santa Rosa Island for freight, and was to return today.”


March 27, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the island last night.”


April 10, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa was to have sailed this afternoon with sheep shearers aboard for Santa Rosa Island.”


April 20, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa last night, bringing over a couple of disabled men, one of whom had one of his feet badly smashed by a falling bale of wool.”


April 20, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa brought over two men from Santa Rosa Island yesterday, who were unable to work owing to some accident they received.”


May 6, 1885 [SBDI]: “Some forty odd sheep shearers came over from Santa Rosa Island early this morning on the schooner Santa Rosa, having got through with their work. Some of them as early as 6 o’clock were seen in a bibulous condition, determined on having a good time while their money lasted. Again, others were more discreet, and appreciate the worth of their money, and apply it to good purposes.”


May 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came into port today for freight for the island of the same name.”


May 27, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over from the island Monday night bringing the sheep shearers, who have now finished their work for the season.”


June 12, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa leaves today for Santa Rosa Island, ostensibly, so we are informed, for beef for our market.”


August 15, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island at 10 o’clock last night.”


September 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “A rare occurrence, it is noted that every vessel of the Channel fleet was in port this morning: the schooners Santa Rosa, Star of Freedom, Rosita, Angel Dolly, the sloop Ocean King, and numberless fishing smacks and pleasure, sail and row boats. The fleet made a pretty picture, dotting the water in every direction from the wharf.”


December 14, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came into port last night from the islands.”


December 17, 1885 [SBDP]: “It was reported by the schooner Santa Rosa, while at this port day before yesterday, that fully two thirds of the wharf at Santa Rosa Island has been washed away by the recent storm.”


March 23, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sails for Santa Rosa Island tomorrow with freight.”


May 1, 1886 [SBDP]: “Captain Sam Burtis Jr. is now shipmaster of the Santa Rosa.”


May 1, 1886 [SBDP]: “The work of rebuilding the wharf at Santa Rosa Island, which was washed away during the past winter, has been somewhat checked by a lodged drill. The beach where the wharf is being constructed is said to be a solid bed of rock, and a hole has to be drilled for the reception of each pile. It was while at this work that the drill became disabled. The schooner Santa Rosa, which arrived in port yesterday morning, is awaiting the arrival from San Francisco of another drill, which has been shipped there to be sharpened.”


May 7, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in yesterday from Santa Rosa Island, bringing over the sheep shearers who have been working there. The present clip is said to be four hundred bales.”


May 7, 1886 [SBDP]: “Captain Burtis of the schooner Santa Rosa reports that work on the new wharf at the island is being prosecuted again, the lodged drill having been extracted and sent to San Francisco to be sharpened. The beach where the wharf is being built is a solid bed of sandstone and consequently slow progress is made. The structure is about half completed.”


May 29, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa arrived from More’s wharf last evening.”


June 15, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday with a cargo of wool from San Miguel Island.”


July 8, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa brought from Santa Rosa Island several sheep shearers.”


July 27, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa is in port.”


July 30, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa cleared yesterday for San Francisco.”


September 6, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in port from San Francisco last night. The Santa Rosa was repainted during her stay in San Francisco. When she ran into the Port Harford wharf she badly damaged her bow.”


September 13, 1886 [SBDP]: “Schooner Santa Rosa was to have taken over to Santa Rosa Island today a large number of sheep shearers.”


September 25, 1886 [SBDI]: “The Santa Rosa weighed anchor this morning and headed for Santa Rosa Island.”


October 11, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa left this morning for the islands.”


October 14, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa has arrived from Santa Rosa Island.”


October 19, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooners Angel Dolly, Santa Rosa and Star of Freedom are in port.”


November 3, 1886 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa yesterday cleared for Santa Rosa Island.”


November 11, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has gone to Santa Cruz for lumber for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 14, 1887 [SBDI]: “Schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday. Mr. Burtis, the captain, reports everything quiet on the island.”


July 27, 1887 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday for Santa Rosa Island.”


August 7, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa was lying at her mooring yesterday.”


September 19, 1887 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday afternoon from the islands bringing in Mr. S. Gourley, a brother of E. T. Gourley, who has been rusticating there a few days.”


October 12, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, left yesterday evening for Santa Rosa Island.”


October 12, 1887 [SBDI]: “The Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


October 27, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left last night for Santa Rosa Island.”


November 2, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Tuesday night from Santa Rosa Island.”


November 17, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday for Santa Rosa Island.”


November 29, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


December 7, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


1888: According to the New Directory of the City of Santa Barbara, 1888, Samuel H. Burtis, Jr. was captain of the schooner Santa Rosa.


February 12, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from the islands.”


March 12, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in yesterday from the islands.”


March 23, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday.”


March 30, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will leave for the islands this afternoon.”


April 7, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday.”


April 14, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from the islands late last night.”


April 15, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


April 30, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa belonging to Mr. More, will take over this morning to Santa Rosa Island forty-eight sheep shearers, all hijos del pais. Shearing will commence at once on the island, and for the next few months business over there will be lively. Mr. Lawrence More has charge of the party.”


May 1, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island with forty sheep shearers on board.”


May 1, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa did not manage to get away yesterday, but left this morning with seventy-five sheep shearers on board for Santa Cruz Island.”


May 4, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island. She had on board a Spaniard who had his leg broken on the island day before yesterday. The man was driving a mule attached to a hay rake and the animal got scared and ran away. The schooner Santa Rosa returned to Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


May 12, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island this morning, and will take back a cargo of lime for making sheep dip.”


May 13, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 22, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Rosa Island last Sunday morning.”


May 24, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over from the islands this morning.”


May 25, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


May 26, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for San Diego today where she will be laid up for repairs.”


May 27, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


June 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 7, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


June 10, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived last Friday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 26, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


July 1, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 8, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


July 11, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived last Monday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island with A. P. More on board.”


September 5, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island with Lawrence More on board.”


September 22, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will sail today for Santa Rosa Island with sixty sheep shearers on board.”


September 22, 1888 [SBDI]: “About fifty men left on the schooner Santa Rosa for Santa Rosa Island to shear sheep.”


October 10, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


October 11, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


October 17, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island. She will return the latter part of this week with about fifty sheep shearers.”


October 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, arrived Monday night from Santa Rosa Island with about fifty sheep shearers.”


November 20, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Sunday evening from Santa Rosa Island.”


December 19, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Monday evening from Santa Rosa Island.”


January 19, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from Santa Rosa Island.”


April 21, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa was in the harbor yesterday from the islands.”


May 12, 1889 [SBMP]: “John More started for Santa Rosa Island in the sloop Santa Rosa yesterday, to bring his brother Alex. P. More to this city.”


May 14, 1889 [SBMP]: “Captain Thompson of the schooner Santa Rosa returned from the islands yesterday, having left John and Lawrence More with their brother. A. P. More is still very ill from the results of his beating at the hands of the shearers and could not be moved.”


May 21, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday, bringing John More, the brother of the injured ranch owner. When the schooner left, A. P. More was doing well and able to move about on the island. Dr. Winchester returned yesterday to his patient to set the broken arm, which was too badly swollen on his previous visit to admit of being touched.”


May 24, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa started to Santa Rosa Island yesterday, having come over Wednesday afternoon. She will probably bring A. P. More to the city tomorrow.”


June 9, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island Friday night with A. P. More, L. W. More and J. B. Joyaux. A. P. More shows no signs of his recent disaster, except a sprained arm which he still keeps in a bandage. The schooner brought over 440 sacks of abalone shells and 197 abalones, which will be unloaded at Goleta.”


July 20, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday, bringing over A. P. More, the owner of the island, who was suffering from a broken leg. On Friday, Mr. More was in a corral directing a man who was lassoing a horse, when he was violently kicked by a horse and his right leg broken between the knee and hip. He was brought across the channel as soon as possible and taken to the residence of his brother, John F. More, where several physicians were summoned and the broken bone set. Mr. More was last evening doing as well as could be expected.”


August 23, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Anacapa Island yesterday to bring back a party of Chinamen who have been there gathering abalones.”


February 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left at noon yesterday for Santa Rosa Island. She will go from there to San Francisco.”


February 25, 1891 [DAC]: “Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa, [Captain] Thompson, 6 days from Santa Rosa Island; ballast, to Master.”


April 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “Schooner Santa Rosa leaves today for Goleta to take on a cargo of corn for the San Francisco market. On her return she is going to bring down a lot of stores for Santa Rosa Island.”


May 5, 1891 [DAC]: “Arrived. Schooner Santa Rosa, [Captain] Thompson, 8 days from Santa Rosa Island; 232 sacks corn, 1 lot dry hides, to Price, Berlin & Co.”


May 17, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in port yesterday afternoon from a trip to San Francisco. She stopped at Santa Rosa Island on her way down.”


May 17, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa leaves today for the islands with a gang of Chinamen to collect abalone shells for Captain G. F. Ellis.”


May 22, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday.”


June 12, 1891 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa arrived from the islands with forty sheep shearers.”


June 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning, bringing over A. P. More, John More and family. Miss Alice Colt and Samuel Colt, who have been spending a couple of weeks on the island. Nothing was known on the island of the loss of a sailor from the sloop Liberty on June 15th, and he had not been washed ashore there. This disposed of the last chance of his safety and Ybarra was undoubtedly drowned.”


August 8, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday.”


August 19, 1891 [SBMP]: “Schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with a load of horses which were landed at Goleta.”


September 22, 1891 [SBMP]: “Schooner Santa Rosa is at Goleta with a cargo of lumber from San Francisco.”


September 27, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 30, 1891 [SBI]: “Capt. Frank Thompson, as usual will spend the winter months on shore and is succeeded in command of the schooner Santa Rosa by Capt. Burtis. We trust Capt. Thompson will devote his time to painting some of the charming marine views which all admire so much and for which he has so much talent. It takes a thorough sailor to paint truthful marine pictures. 'Land lubbers' usually make caricatures. A ship — sails set properly, sky and ocean truthful — makes on of the grandest of all pictures. No landsman can expect to accomplish this. It takes a seaman, who has served a long apprenticeship, to bring out the nice details and make the view realistic. Capt. Thompson succeeds admirably.”


November 4, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon. She will return on Friday or Saturday with a band of sheep shearers.”


November 6, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with a gang of sheep shearers.”


November 28, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning, and the Star of Freedom for Anacapa where she will be repaired.”


December 2, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is back from Santa Rosa Island. She brought over a party of men who had been hunting wild hogs. In five weeks they killed 700 of the animals.”


December 16, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


December 25, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, is over from Santa Cruz Island. She will leave in a few days for San Francisco.”


January 5, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has gone to Goleta from which place she will sail for Santa Rosa Island.”


January 12, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa was busy loading provisions yesterday and will sail for San Nicolas Island this morning.”


January 12, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, left for San Nicolas Island yesterday with a number of Chinamen.”


January 14, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has gone to the San Nicolas Island and San Pedro.”


February 5, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, has returned from San Pedro.”


February 11, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


February 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday.”


March 22, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burgess [Burtis], left yesterday evening for Santa Rosa Island, thence to San Francisco.”


April 26, 1892 [SBMP]: “A large party of sheep shearers left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday on the schooner Santa Rosa.”


April 28, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island taking some sheep shearers along.”


May 1, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday.”


May 1, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, on her last trip to Santa Rosa Island took about fifty sheep shearers over, one of whom was washed overboard and drowned. He was a single man, named José Reyes from Ventura County. His body was not recovered.”


May 6, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa expects to leave today for the islands.”


May 7, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Cruz Islands yesterday morning.”


May 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa expects to leave today for the islands.”


May 20, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in the harbor from the islands.”


May 20, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning bringing fifty-six sheep shearers, and every shearer brought a sheep or a lamb with him, in addition to his regular wages.”


June 14, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday noon.”


June 15, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned to the islands.”


July 1, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed for the islands yesterday afternoon. Clark P. Streator, Assistant Ornithologist United States Department of Agriculture, was a passenger. He was going over there to secure some specimens and information.”


July 17, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning.”


July 18, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa cleared for Santa Rosa Island today with a number of sheep shearers.”


July 20, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


July 26, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa sailed yesterday for Chinamen and shells.”


July 26, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will sail for San Nicolas Island for some Chinamen.”


August 4, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


August 9, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island Sunday.”


September 3, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


September 4, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


September 6, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in the harbor from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 6, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa also came in from Santa Rosa Island about noon.”


September 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday with J. F. More.”


September 16, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon, but was ignorant of there having been a wreck on the seaside of the island.”


September 25, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands Friday morning.”


September 27, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned from the island.”


September 30, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday for the islands. She will return with the sheep shearers in about two weeks.”


October 1, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned from Santa Cruz [Island] with two seals. They were shipped to San Francisco last night on the Eureka.”


October 4, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday.”


August 29, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa and the schooner Star of Freedom are in from the islands.”


October 5, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the island yesterday.”


October 16, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from the islands. The captain reports having visited the scene of the wrecked bark, Goldenhorn, and says that the vessel has collapsed, lies over on her beam ends, and in fact there is little left of the ship above water.”


October 18, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island with a crew of Chinamen who have been engaged in securing a cargo of abalone shells. Mr. John T. More will return on the boat.”


October 19, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island with a crew of Chinamen who have been engaged in securing a cargo of abalone shells. Mr. John T. Moore will return on the boat.”


October 25, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from the islands. It arrived here yesterday.”


October 26, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon.”


November 2, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came from the island of Santa Rosa yesterday. Mr. Moore and Mrs. Moore were passengers. [Note: Frank P. Moore was superintendent on Santa Rosa Island.]


November 3, 1892 [LAT/SNC]: “Captain Samuel Burtis has resigned his position as captain of the schooner Santa Rosa, which plies between Santa Barbara and the islands, and Paolo Gentine has been appointed in his place and will hereafter sail the schooner.”


December 2, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came into port yesterday morning. She leaves in a few days for Catalina for repairs.”


December 5, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


December 7, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Samuel Burtis and Miss Susan Lehner were united in marriage at the residence of the bride’s parents on Guiterrez Street at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon by the Reverend C. T. Weitzel. Both are well known residents of Santa Barbara, and they start on married life with the best wishes of hosts of friends. The happy couple left on yesterday evening’s train for Los Angeles where they will spend a month’s honeymoon in that city. Captain Burtis’ friends are rejoiced to see how rapidly he has regained his health since quitting the Santa Rosa, and they now hope for his complete recovery.”


January 5, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island Tuesday night.


January 19, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left Tuesday for Santa Rosa Island taking 17 head of cattle to that place from Goleta.”


January 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


February 14, 1893 [SBMP]: “Sunday afternoon Bent Ellefson, a sailor on board the schooner Santa Rosa, ended his life by a bullet to his brain. The deceased was a young man 24 years of age, unmarried, and had parents who are now living in Norway... He had not been working long on the Santa Rosa, having been engaged by the Captain only about fifteen days ago...”


February 23, 1894 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa set sail today for More’s Landing, where she will take a cargo of asphaltum for San Francisco.”


February 28, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from San Clemente Island Sunday with a cargo of four tons of gravel. The schooner will take a load of lumber back to Santa Rosa Island.”


March 2, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning by way of Goleta.”


March 17, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in the harbor yesterday afternoon from the islands.”


March 19, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


March 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


April 2, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning bringing a load of abalone shells and a number of sacks of dried abalones. They have been gathered on the island in the past four months by a camp of Chinamen located there for that purpose.”


April 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for the islands yesterday for another cargo of abalone shells.”


April 7, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a cargo of abalone shells.”


April 8, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed yesterday afternoon for Santa Rosa Island.”


April 16, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday afternoon for Santa Rosa Island with 60 sheep shearers. The wool crop will be good this year.”


April 21, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the island yesterday afternoon with a load of sheep shearers.”


April 26, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned from the island.”


May 5, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday morning.”


May 8, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in the harbor yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 9, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over from Santa Rosa Island Monday morning with two San Francisco livestock dealers from Baden Slaughtering Company, who closed a $50,000 livestock contract for 10,000 sheep and 400 head of cattle from that island.”


May 14, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 26, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa brought Mr. More over from Santa Rosa Island yesterday and will return taking two Chinamen over to look for abalones.”


May 27, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over from Santa Rosa Island and will return with a load of Chinamen who go over to gather abalones there.”


June 13, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and Star of Freedom are expected in from the islands today.”


June 19, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Saturday night from Santa Rosa Island. Mr. J. F. More was passenger.”


June 20, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned to the islands from the north.”


June 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa are expected in from the islands today or tomorrow.”


June 26, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday.”


June 27, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from the island.”


June 27, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island last evening.”


June 28, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has gone to the islands on one of her regular trips.”


July 2, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, and the gasoline schooner Santa Cruz are expected over from the islands today.”


July 4, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and San Mateo, and the sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning.”


July 5, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooners Santa Rosa, San Mateo, and the sloops Liberty, Restless and Ida were in the harbor this morning. The Santa Cruz returned to the island yesterday.”


July 11, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is gleaming with a fresh coat of paint.”


July 14, 1893 [SBDI]: “The first Santa Barbara Boys Brigade returned on the Santa Rosa this morning from their outing at Avalon, Catalina Island. They report a pleasant trip and their appearance shows plainly that they have seen lots of outdoor life.”


July 19, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 24, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left the harbor early this afternoon.”


August 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, arrived in our harbor last evening from the islands and cast anchor just off the wharf.”


September 2, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for that island Thursday, Captain Frank Thompson in command.”


October 6, 1893 [SBDI]: “The gasoline schooner Santa Cruz and the schooner Santa Rosa, returned to the islands today.”


October 9, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “A large party of sheep shearers left this morning for Santa Rosa Island on the schooner Santa Rosa.”


October 18, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, is in with a cargo of 321 sacks of abalone shells, 69 sacks of abalone, and five sacks of seaweed from the Chinese camp on Santa Rosa Island. The abalone and seaweed are for shipment to China, where they are cooked and served in oriental style and considered great delicacies.”


November 13, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, is in from Santa Rosa Island.”


January 11, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has gone to the island with a crew of Chinamen to gather in a supply of abalone. They are not intended for the Amphibia.”


January 17, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in the harbor from Santa Rosa Island.”


March 1, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will sail for the islands today.”


March 23, 1894 [SBMP]: “The sloop Liberty from San Miguel Island, Young America from Santa Cruz, and the schooner Santa Rosa from Santa Rosa Island were in the harbor yesterday.”


April 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from the islands last evening.”


April 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa brought over seven tons of shells and ten tons of abalones.”


April 18, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from the islands.”


April 23, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa and sloop Liberty arrived today from the islands. The Santa Cruz also came in with Deputy Assessor J. L Barker and party on board.”


May 9, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left last evening for Santa Rosa Island.”


May 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned from the islands with 50 sheep shearers on board.”


May 28, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “John T. More and a party from San Francisco, who were appointed appraisers of the estate of the late Alexander P. More, have just arrived on the schooner Santa Rosa from a trip to Santa Rosa Island, which comprises a large portion of the estate.”


June 4, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has arrived from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 6, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has arrived from the islands.”


June 8, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa did not sail as expected yesterday afternoon, and Messrs. Braunhart, More and party will not leave until this evening or tomorrow for the island.”


June 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in yesterday from the island with T. R. More, F. M. Whitney and Mr. Braunhart on board. The work of appraising the property is not finished.”


June 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has left for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 7, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over yesterday from Santa Rosa Island.”


July 24, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is over from the island.”


July 31, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday afternoon.”


August 2, 1894 [SBDI]: “Mr. John More returned from the island yesterday afternoon on the schooner Santa Rosa.”


August 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “Yesterday afternoon a crowd of from two to three hundred people assembled on the beach to witness the launching of the pleasure yacht Dolphin… the schooner Santa Rosa was moored close to shore to render assistance if possible.”


August 10, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


August 15, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island this morning and unloaded 130 sacks of abalones and 100 sacks of shells at the wharf. This is the result of about three months’ work of a number of Chinese abalone fishermen.”


August 16, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa tied up at the wharf this morning to unload one hundred and thirty sacks of shells from Santa Rosa Island.”


August 16, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa this morning took on board the pile driver recently built on the wharf, and sailed with it to Santa Rosa Island this afternoon.”


August 17, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the island this afternoon.”


August 18, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa started for the islands yesterday.”


August 23, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned from Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


August 27, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in this port from the island yesterday.”


August 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed last night for Goleta where she will take on a party of workmen and sail for the island to put up the new pile driver.”


August 30, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left last night for Goleta, where she takes on board a force of men to work on the wharf, and sails for Santa Rosa Island.”


September 2, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned yesterday from Santa Rosa Island where the crew has been assisting in driving piles for a wharf there.”


September 11, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 17, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Saturday night from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 18, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed today for Santa Rosa Island.”


September 19, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for the islands yesterday.”


September 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived this morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over yesterday from Santa Rosa Island bringing a swordfish taken near the island for Dr. Yates.”


September 30, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday afternoon to bring back the men who have been engaged in pile driving on the island.”


October 1, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last evening from Santa Rosa Island, bringing over a swordfish taken near there, which will be stuffed and added to Dr. Yates’ collection.”


October 5, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived this morning from Santa Rosa Island with the pile drivers, they having completed the work of repairing the wharf at that place.”


October 8, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed this morning for Santa Rosa Island with a large party of sheep shearers.”


October 13, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


October 14, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa is in from the island.”


October 15, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


October 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived this morning with a cargo of sheep from Santa Rosa Island.”


October 22, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed yesterday for Santa Rosa Island.”


October 29, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived this morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


November 1, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


November 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for the islands yesterday. She will return in a few days and then be sent to San Pedro for an overhauling.”


November 12, 1894 [SBDI]: “The weather for the past week has been the thickest known among the coast for years. Seamen report dense fog night and day. On Saturday night the schooner Santa Rosa, lying at anchor in this port, narrowly escaped being run down by the Coos Bay making for the wharf. The Coos Bay did not discover the schooner until almost over her, passing so close as to strike the boom of the Santa Rosa, but doing no serious damage. There has been no wind at all to speak of and the ocean is very smooth.”


November 15, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


November 20, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has returned to Santa Rosa Island.”


November 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island. Captain Thompson visited the wreck of the steamer Crown of England on Saturday last. He says that she is still in good condition, nothing being broken but her sternpost…”


November 28, 1894 [LAT/SB]: “The steamer [schooner] Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island. Captain Thompson visited the wreck of the Crown of England, Saturday. He says that in her position there is little danger of breaking up. While there are several large holes in her bottom, there is nothing else injured about the ship with the exception of a broken sternpost. She lies on a ledge of rocks supported from stem to stern, and as yet there is but four feet of water in the hold. Captain Thompson thinks everything of value on the ship can be saved without trouble.”


December 26, 1894 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday from San Pedro, where she has also been undergoing repairs, and sailed this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


January 2, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, arrived last evening from Santa Rosa Island. Captain Thompson reports that the weather has been so rough that for several days work on the wrecked steamer has been suspended, and the tugs and schooners anchored in a sheltered place, but that they returned to the scene of the wreck Sunday evening. He says that they have removed all the machinery from the vessel except the two boilers and the condenser, and that another schooner arrived last week from San Francisco to take the boilers.”


January 25, 1895 [LAT]: “Captain Thompson of the schooner Santa Rosa, reports a derelict pontoon, forty by twenty feet, floating off Santa Cruz Island and level with the water.”


April 5, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from the islands.”


April 7, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has arrived from the islands.”


April 11, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from the Santa Rosa Island.”


April 22, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed yesterday for Santa Rosa Island.”


April 24, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in the harbor last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 6, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived in the harbor last night.”


May 7, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa has sailed for Santa Rosa Island.”


May 16, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 22, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed this morning for Santa Rosa Island.”


May 30, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived last night from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 30, 1895 [SBDI]: “Mr. C. E. Sherman returned last evening on the schooner Santa Rosa from Santa Rosa Island where he has been taking stock of sheep there.”


May 31, 1895 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed today for Santa Rosa Island.”


June 9, 1895 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara, June 8. Henry Rohrbeck, a wrecker employed on the ship Crown of England, ashore on Santa Rosa Island, was struck by a piece of iron early this week and his leg was badly fractured. Rohrbeck laid for days without surgical attendance and was today brought to the Cottage Hospital for treatment. Captain McGinn of the Santa Rosa states that the high winds of last week blew down the derricks, completely checking the work of the wreckers.”


July 29, 1895 [SBDI]: “The islands’ boats Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz were both in harbor yesterday.”


September 1, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The three boats which regularly ply between Santa Barbara and the islands… the Santa Rosa, belonging to the More estate, and plying back and forth between the island of the same name and the mainland… all came in yesterday afternoon.”


September 26, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, arriving from the island yesterday, reports the heaviest northeaster for many years at this season. In leaving the harbor at Santa Rosa Island, she was carried near the rocks several times, but managed to get away without serious harm. She reported that another schooner was also in a hazardous position for awhile, but succeeded in reaching safe anchorage.”


September 28, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 26, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned from Santa Rosa Island today, reporting that the windstorm that had been raging for several days, had spent its force.”


October 6, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed today for Santa Rosa Island with about fifty sheep shearers.”


October 21, 1895 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Thompson of the schooner Santa Rosa came over today from the islands, and reports a heavy fall of rain in that section.”


November 9, 1895 [SBDP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Frank Thompson, arrived yesterday morning from Santa Rosa Island.”


May 9, 1896 [SBDI]: “A party of fifteen Chinamen were shipped in two parties this morning for the islands of Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa, by the schooners bearing the same names. They are abalone fishermen and have with them a complete outfit for a long stay on the islands. They use long flat bottom boats, like the sharpie of the New England coast, save that it is steered by a clumsy oriental-looking sweep tied to the stern instead of the ordinary oar or rudder.”


June 16, 1896 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, went to Santa Rosa Island the forenoon with a company of sheep shearers.”


June 16, 1896 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left this morning with seventy sheep shearers, bound for Santa Rosa Island.”


July 3, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Rosa Island schooner came over yesterday, bringing home a number of campers and taking others on the back trip.”


August 26, 1896 [SBDN]: “The schooner under command of Captain Frank Thompson raised anchor this morning and started for Santa Rosa Island with a crew of employees for the island.”


September 25, 1896 [SBH]: “Albert W. More arrived from San Francisco this weekend to take charge of Santa Rosa Island in the name of Mrs. Ellen Miller, administratrix of the More estate. He was taken to the island by the schooner Santa Rosa yesterday.”


September 25, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa went to the islands yesterday, taking a large party of Barbareños for a week’s outing.”


October 28, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the islands today.”


November 4, 1896 [LAT/SB]: “Captain Thompson returned to port with his schooner, Santa Rosa last night, having failed to land his Chinamen on the islands on account of rough seas. The Chinamen went over to gather abalones.”


November 29, 1896 [NYT]:


December 2, 1896 [SBDN]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came over from the island last evening having on board Mrs. Miller, administrative of the estate of the More estate, and C. A. Storke, Esq., her counsel.”


January 31, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa returned from San Pedro last night and will leave tomorrow for Santa Rosa Island. Captain Burtis is in command.”


April 18, 1897 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left again for Santa Rosa Island this morning with those same forty-five or fifty sheep shearers aboard that she started out with some days ago. There are thousands of sheep over there in a corral and have been there for a week, waiting for the shearers… The heavy fog prevented them from making a landing… Captain Thompson says this is the most peculiar experience he has ever had.”


June 24, 1897 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Thompson, came in from Santa Rosa Island last evening.”


July 10, 1897 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will return to the island next week.”


July 17, 1897 [SBDN]: “The sheep shearers left on the schooner Santa Rosa for Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


July 17, 1897 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island today with fifteen shearers.”


August 5, 1897 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left yesterday for Santa Rosa Island with John Lawlar as passenger. Lawlar purchased from the island 400 head of cattle, two hundred goats, and six hundred sheep. He is now attending to the shipping of the stock, the last of which he will send up this week.”


November 4, 1897 [LAT/SP]: “The small schooner Santa Rosa, from Santa Barbara, has come to this port to be repaired on the ways.”


June 29, 1898 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


October 20, 1898 [LAT/SP]: “Arrived… schooner Santa Rosa from Santa Barbara in ballast…”


December 8, 1898 [ ]: Captain Burtis rescued the crew of the Helene who stranded at Forney's Cove on the schooner, Santa Rosa.


December 13, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came into port late last night bring with her six shipwrecked men from the schooner Helene… The six men on the vessel were Ramon Vasquez, Joseph Leva, Colice Vasquez, Joe Cota and Charles Shout…”



December 20, 1898 [SBMP]: “Rosaline Vasquez has visited the scene of the wreck of the Helene and obtained part of the rigging, the mainsail, etc. He returned yesterday on the schooner Santa Rosa, reporting nothing left of the sloop but pieces. Captain [Ramon] Vasquez is improving slowly now, having passed the danger point.”


December 20, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island early this morning. The captain reports that feed is looking very good on the island, and that the last rains helped it wonderfully.”


December 21, 1898 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa will sail tomorrow morning for Santa Rosa Island taking with her seven or eight sheep shearers and a Chinese cook. In former years it required at least forty shearers at this time of the year, but owing to the dry season it is found to be impossible to gather the sheep owing to their poor condition.”


January 18, 1899 [LAT/SB]: The schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Burtis, came in from Santa Rosa Island last evening, bringing four sheep-shearers. Captain Burtis reports nearly ten inches of rain for the last storm on the island, and states that feed there is plentiful. He reports that all sheep and lambs are in fine condition; in fact, as good condition as they have been for several years. The wild hogs on the island have been devouring a great many lambs, and seem to be as numerous as ever, regardless of the dry year. The remaining shearers will be brought back the first of the week.”


January 26, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “Schooner Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island this morning, bringing over twenty sheep-shearers who had finished their work on the island. Captain Burtis reports feed growing excellently and all sheep and cattle in fine condition.”


January 28, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


February 2, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Rosa came in from Santa Rosa Island early this morning, bringing over Messrs. Weller and Mills, both prominent stock men from Los Angeles. The schooner will go immediately to Santa Catalina Island, where she will be beached and undergo some repairs to her rudder.”


February 24, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday afternoon.”


February 28, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The Santa Rosa schooner arrived today from Santa Rosa Island. “


April 4, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed yesterday morning for Santa Rosa Island with twelve sheep shearers as passengers.”


July 14, 1899 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


July 15, 1899 [SBMP]: “M. A. Botello sent two homing pigeons over to the island on the schooner Santa Rosa, Captain Russell, by J. W. Spoonover, who will release them, and Mr. Botello is expecting his pigeons this morning with notes bearing the hour of their flight and any news concerning Santa Rosa Island.”


July 24, 1899 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for the islands this morning.”


August 1, 1899 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa leaves this morning for Forney’s Cove, Santa Cruz Island, where she goes to bring over Captain Mullett’s seals, which were caught last week. These animals will be sold to museums and zoological gardens of the east. The Southern Pacific Company has also ordered a few for its exhibit at the Paris exposition.”


August 4, 1899 [SBMP]: “Twelve tons of seals. Forty of them arrive from the islands yesterday. Island fleet of boats runs a race across the channel. Pearl the winner... Petrel, Captain Bates, and Pearl, Captain Vasquez, were also ready to start, when one of the skippers, probably Captain Burtis of the Santa Rosa, proposed a race to Santa Barbara...”


August 9, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa sailed for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning on her regular trip.”


August 15, 1899 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island this morning.”


August 16, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from the island early yesterday morning. She reports very heavy winds in the channel between the islands.”


August 24, 1899 [SBMP]: “The Santa Rosa returned to Santa Rosa Island late last evening. She will return Friday, when Mr. Storke will come over from a business trip to the island.”


August 24, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “The Catalina Conserving Company’s schooner, the Magic, Captain O’Brien, is lying a wreck in the rocky channel between Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands. The schooner Santa Rosa arrived here yesterday bringing over Edward Duffy, engineer of the lost vessel, and two of her crew, one a boy. Duffy and his companions had an exciting experience during the accident...”


September 18, 1899 [NYT]: “A large whale was washed ashore on the east end of Santa Rosa Island on Friday, September 8. It was still alive when found, but expired shortly afterward. Captain Curran of the Santa Rosa stated that the whale was of a kind that he had never seen before. The monster was sixty feet in length.”


September 27, 1899 [SBDI]: “The island schooner Santa Rosa was taking on a cargo of lumber for Captain Waters at San Miguel Island, and the gasoline launch Santa Cruz was loading with freight for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 6, 1899 [SBDI]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived from Santa Rosa Island yesterday.”


November 7, 1899 [SBMP]: “The schooner Santa Rosa arrived Sunday morning from Santa Rosa with the mail and ten sheep shearers and vaqueros. They report that the island wharf suffered considerably by the heavy sea and high breakers of several days ago. It was the heaviest surf that has been experienced on the island for several years. The planking of the wharf for a considerable distance was carried away.”


November 26, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “Schooner Santa Rosa lost in Cuyler’s Harbor. The steamer Santa Cruz brought into port Captain Burtis and Philip Curran, the crew of the Santa Rosa, and they tell a tale of terrible suffering for three days and nights, and the wreck of the finest vessel in the harbor. The schooner Santa Rosa, belonging to the A. P. More estate, was lost early Friday morning in Cuyler’s Harbor, San Miguel Island, during a raging southeaster. The Santa Rosa left this port Sunday morning with freight and mail for Santa Rosa Island, and on Monday proceeded to San Miguel and encountered a southeaster, with a heavy sea. She put into Cuyler’s Harbor and threw out both her heavy anchors. The storm became fiercer and breakers began rolling over the vessel. Every jerk the captain thought to be the last and fatal one. Two hundred yards off were several hidden rocks. This lasted two days when, on Friday morning at 3 o’clock, one anchor chain parted and the vessel dragged the other and was at the mercy of the sea. The small entrance to the channel was a whirlwind of fighting waves. The vessel could not be controlled and was fast closing in on the sunken rocks. Seeing this, the men lowered the boat and had no sooner gotten in when, looking about, they saw the Santa Rosa covered by a wave, and that was the last time she was seen. They had had nothing to eat for twenty-four hours before the wreck. They made for the open sea, and for fifteen hours were at the mercy of the waves, when finally picked up by the steamer Santa Cruz. The Santa Rosa was the largest vessel in the channel, being thirty-five tons register. She was built for the More brothers in 1878 for use in the island business. She was valued at $6000, with no insurance, and last year $1000 worth of repairs were made on her.”


December 7, 1899 [LAT/SB]: “A wrecking party returned last night from the wreck of the schooner Santa Rosa on the rocks in Cuyler’s Harbor, San Miguel Island. The ship is a wreck. About eight hundred pounds of copper from her bottom was the only valuable wreckage brought back.”


December 9, 1899 [PD]: “Santa Barbara County. The schooner Santa Rosa was wrecked during the recent storm in Cuyler’s Harbor, San Miguel Island. The crew escaped in boats, but had a hard time, tossing about the water for three days, and having nothing to eat for twenty-four hours.”