Star of Freedom

From WikiName
Jump to: navigation, search

Star of Freedom (#23205) (1864-1895+), 54-foot wooden sloop of 23.99 gross tons built in San Francisco by J. E. Thayer and sold to Theodore Lemmen Meyer. She received her tonnage admeasurement certificate #1089 on January 12, 1865. Her master in 1865 was M. Sanford. Lemmen Meyer was one of ten original incorporators of the Santa Cruz Island Company in 1869. Star of Freedom is the second vessel known to have performed the services of the Santa Cruz Island Company, after the J. D. Sanborn, sailed by Captain Chase. Chase then became master of Star of Freedom. During her career, masters of Star of Freedom included captains Chase, C. Thomas, Samuel Burtis, Davis, Harry Higgins, James G. Prescott, and Frank Wildes Thompson. After more than two decades of island service, Star of Freedom was sold by the company and replaced with their custom schooner, Santa Cruz (schooner), built in 1893. The following year, Star of Freedom was stolen by famous Pacific pirate, Oscar Bartels, and sailed to Mexico. Her fate remains unknown, although it is thought she perished near La Paz.




In the News~

1867 San Francisco Delinquent Tax List. Shipping. Sloop Star of Freedom. Thayer, J. E.


January 7, 1871 [DAC]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, 23 tons, has been sold to the Santa Cruz Island Company for $2300.”


February 4, 1871 [SBT]: “We have just learned from Captain Brown that Captain Chase, who commanded the schooner Sanborn, has traded her for a first class passenger yacht [Star of Freedom], and will leave San Francisco about the 10th instant for this place, and will thereafter ply between our port and Santa Cruz Island.”


February 25, 1871 [SBT]: “Arrived. February 22. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, San Francisco, ballast.”


April 22, 1871 [SBT]: “[Captain] Chase, the genial master of that splendid yacht, the Star of Freedom, dropped in on us a few days since with the pleasing information that he is overhauling his boat and preparing her for the accommodation of pleasure parties, families and others who wish to employ such means of recreation.”


June 10, 1871 [SBT]: “Several schooners are laying in our harbor at present, none of which we recognize, except the Star of Freedom, which has been repainted and renovated lately.”


November 4, 1871 [SBT]: “Departures. October 29. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, Santa Cruz Island.”


November 4, 1871 [SBT]: “Arrivals. October 31. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island.”


June 17, 1871 [SBT]: “Captain Chase has now got his yacht, Star of Freedom, ready to accommodate pleasure parties. Those desiring to engage the vessel can apply on board or to Leland & Co.”


October 16, 1872 [SBT]: “Voyage of the Star of Freedom to Santa Cruz Island. The passengers and baggage esconded aboard safely at 3 P.M. The bold and noble Captain [Chase] gave orders to haul in the boy and heave up the fish hook. We then set sail and bore away for the island of Santa Rosa. It was a tempestuous night, but the bold Captain, with undaunted courage, stood at the brakes…”


November 15, 1872 [DAC]: “Arrived. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, 8 days from Santa Cruz Island; in ballast, to Master.”


May 7, 1873 [SBMP]: “A Picture of Santa Rosa Island. Professor James and a party left about 11 A.M. today (Thursday) in the schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, for Santa Rosa Island. The Professor and his assistants will take a picture of the island and views of objects of interest thereon, under the auspices of the Press, this being the beginning of the proposed work heretofore announced. The accompanying party was quite large. Messrs. Henry and Alexander More, the owners of the island, have manifested a substantial interest in this enterprise of illustrating Southern California, and have shown their faith in the general and special good that will result from its accomplishment by their generous pecuniary aid. Santa Rosa Island, with its varied scenery, will make a beautiful picture. We hope to obtain views of the other islands.”


July 11, 1873 [SBMP]: Arrived. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. July 19. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


July 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. July 19. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Catalina Island.”


August 14, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. August 6. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Catalina Island.”


August 14, 1873 [SBDP]: “Sailed. August 8. Schooner Star of Freedom for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 23, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. August 14. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from San Miguel Island; cargo of seal skins and oil.”


August 23, 1873 [SBDP]: “Sailed. August 16. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, Santa Cruz Island.”


August 30, 1873 [SBSWT]: “Excursionists have a rare chance now. Captain Chase, a popular officer and most competent and careful sailor, has fitted out the Star of Freedom for the purpose of accommodating the pleasure seeking public. Let everyone fond of fishing and sailing patronize the Captain.”


September 6, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. September 2. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 12, 1873 [SBW]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Rosa Island carrying abalone.”


September 14, 1873 [SBDMT]: “Shipping News—Arrived—schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, master, from Cañada Corral.”


September 14, 1873 [SBDMT]: “The fishing excursion on the Star of Freedom today promises to be a grand affair. This schooner is a model of neatness, a fast sailor and perfect in all her appointments. Her captain [Chase] is a most affable gentleman, and judging from past experiences we predict a splendid time and plenty of fish. To all lovers of this sport we say go by all means.”


September 15, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. September 12. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Rosa Island.”


September 15, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. September 14. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 15, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. September 15. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 16, 1873 [SBDMT]: “A party of gentlemen leave this morning at 8 o’clock to cross the channel in search of piscatorial sport. The good ship Star of Freedom, the gallant [Captain] Chase commanding, will bear the jolly party to the scene of action. She has been well victualed with fifty cases of wine and demijohns of assorted liquors, all of which have been duly licensed by the Internal Revenue Collector, who goes along to see that it is not retailed. The fish will be brought back in a Chinese junk. The invalids are expected to be at home again tomorrow evening. We wish them luck.”


September 20, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. September 16. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 20, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. September 17. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 20, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. September 19. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 23, 1873 [SBDMT]: “Another fishing excursion takes place today. A party of pleasure seekers has persuaded the gallant Captain Chase to trim the sails of the Star of Freedom for a voyage across the channel in search of yellowtails, red fish, etc. The voyagers are to leave this morning at 8 o’clock. We hope they may have plenty of sport and a good time generally.”


September 24, 1873 [SBDMT]: “The fishing excursion Sunday was a grand success. Although the boys started late they had a spanking breeze and plenty of fish. [Captain] Chase and the yacht [Star of Freedom] are winning golden laurels for themselves.”


September 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. September 21. Schooner Star of Freedom, from fishing excursion.”


September 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. September 22. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, fishing excursion.”


September 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. September 27. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from fishing expedition.”


September 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. September 23. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 26, 1873 [SBDP]: “The trim little schooner Star of Freedom, which left here last Tuesday with a pleasant party, for Santa Cruz Island, returned this morning. The party spent about two days at the island, and brought back about fifty pounds of red fish and four large mackerel.”

September 27, 1873 [SBWP]: “Arrived. September 27. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from fishing expedition.”


September 27, 1873 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is getting to be a great favorite with excursionists, and deservedly so. She and her accommodating Captain are ready for another trip. Pleasure seekers should be on the alert.”


October 8, 1873 [SBMP]: “Departures. Oct. 5, schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 11, 1873 [SBT]: “The Star of Freedom has returned from Santa Cruz Island and Captain Chase is ready for another fishing excursion.”


October 12, 1873 [SBDMT]: “Mr. Tittmann of the United States Coast Survey, and his party left yesterday on board the schooner Star of Freedom for San Miguel Island. In the party are Mr. Woodward and Mr. Edwards of the Survey. They are engaged in the work of main triangulations. We hope to see them soon again in Santa Barbara.”


October 14, 1873 [SBMP]: “Arrived. October 7th, schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 24, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. October 16. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Gaviota.”


October 24, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. October 21. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 26, 1873 [SBDMT]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, was to sail this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 28, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. October 22. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 28, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. October 26. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, on fishing expedition.”


October 28, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. October 28. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 11, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. November 6. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from the Islands.”


November 15, 1873 [SBW]: “The schooner Star of Freedom departed for the islands for abalone and hides.”


November 22, 1873 [SBSWT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, arrived at this port yesterday afternoon. She comes from San Miguel Island and Santa Cruz Island.”


November 22, 1873 [SBSWT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island. She had on board five saddle horses for parties on the island.”


November 28, 1873 [SBMP]: “Arrived. November 21— Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 29, 1873 [SBSWT]: “Sailed November 22, for San Miguel Island, schooner Star of Freedom.”


November 29, 1873 [SBSWT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from San Miguel Island.”


December 2, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. November 25. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from San Miguel.”


December 2, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. November 29. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 2, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. November 28. Schooner Star of Freedom, Chase, for the Islands.”


December 13, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. December 3. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Islands.”


December 13, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. December 7. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 19, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. December 14. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from the Islands.”


December 19, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. December 17. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from the Islands.”


December 19, 1873 [SBDP]: “Departures. December 15. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for the Islands.”


December 27, 1873 [SBDP]: “Arrived. December 22. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from the Islands.”


January 6, 1874 [SBDMT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island with supplied for the U.S. Coast Survey yesterday. It will take several months to complete the work now in progress there.”


January 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. January 1. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from San Miguel Island.”


January 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. January 2. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Prisoners’ Harbor.”


January 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. January 4. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from the Islands.”


January 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. January 7. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for the Islands.”


January 23, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. January 20. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 30, 1874 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. January 23. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


January 30, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. January 26. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for Santa Cruz Island.”


February 4, 1874 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. January 29. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 4, 1874 [SBDP]: “Arrivals. February 3. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 12, 1874 [SBDP]: “Departures. February 8. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 14, 1874 [SBDMT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, yesterday made the best time between Santa Rosa Island and this port that probably was ever made under sail on the coast by any vessel of her class. She ran in a distance of 37 miles in three hours. She is a small craft of 24 tons and 50 feet keel, and not built specifically for speed.”


March 18, 1874 [SBDMT]: “A trip among the woolies… our attention was called to a saucy little schooner which at that moment was gliding into port under a cloud of snowy canvas. Upon inquiry we learned that it was the Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, and that she belonged to the Santa Cruz Island Company… We held a consultation with the captain, and two days later behold us on the deck of the yacht bound on a voyage of discovery to that mysterious land, Santa Cruz. We got under way at 10 A. M… On our way over we learned that the Company was in the midst of their annual shearing, and we determined to pay a visit to the ranch and see all we could. Going ashore we found a wagon, which had been sent for the freight which came with us, and taking passage in it we were soon at the hospitable portals of the main ranch house. We were just in time, as they were at that moment preparing for a move to the mountains, there to camp for the night and commence driving the sheep at the first peep of day. Horses were kindly furnished us, and we joined the cavalcade fully determined to take the rough with the smooth. Up, up, up over the roughest trails we have ever seen traveled… It was nearly dark when we reached the rendezvous, a small basin at the top of the mountain, and immediately the work of unsaddling and tethering was gone through with…a sheep had been lassoed on the way, and was now quickly killed and flayed… and it was roasted before the fire on two huge iron spits… Long before daybreak the camp was astir, horses saddled, breakfast eaten and the party divided, for it was necessary for a portion of the men to go on foot through the canyons and drive the sheep to the ridges where the horsemen massed them in droves… it was no light task to keep those wild sheep moving in the proper direction… All being mounted, we dropped to the rear and followed them home where arrived late that afternoon… After a thorough wash and a substantial supper we strolled around the houses and hearing music in one, knocked and were admitted, and to our astonishment here were our friends of the day whom we imagined completely worn out, singing and dancing to the music of accordion and guitar and seemingly as fresh as if there was not a canyon, mountain or sheep in existence… We were awakened early by the clang of the large ranch bell and hastily dressing we reported for breakfast after which we repaired to the shearing shed where the men were already at work. About thirty were shearing… We stayed a couple hours in the shed and then, as the wagon was ready to take us to the beach, we stepped in and had the pleasure of dining with Captain Chase, the sails were hoisted, and we took tea with Monsieur Raffour and were home again. Claire.”


March 21, 1874 [SBDMT]: “Schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, arrived here yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 24, 1874 [SBSWT]: “Arrived. March 22—Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, captain, from Santa Cruz Island.”


April 25, 1874 [SBSWT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with a cargo of wool belonging to the Island company.”


May 9, 1874 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom returned from Santa Rosa Island this Saturday afternoon bringing Professor James and party. They all say they had a pleasant time. A picture of the island and views of special objects of interest thereon have been taken. The party was accompanied by H. C. Hodge, who will doubtless give his impressions in print of what he saw on the island and many interesting facts concerning that place.”


May 11, 1874 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, brought fifty-seven bales of wool from Santa Rosa Island on Saturday. This wool is from the clipping made by Messrs. Henry and Alexander More.”


May 16, 1874 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Rosa Island at 11 A.M. today (Saturday) with a large amount of tobacco stems and sulphur.”


May 24, 1874 [SBDMT]: “The Star of Freedom, from Santa Cruz Island, brought over a lot of sheep;”


August 24, 1874 [SBDP]: “The Island of Santa Rosa by J. Ross Browne. A few weeks ago, while on a visit to Santa Barbara, it was my good fortune to meet one of the owners of Santa Rosa Island, Mr. H. H. More, who cordially invited me to make a voyage with him to that romantic retreat, of which so little is known even on this coast… Without a word of objection, I shouldered my knapsack and embarked with him on board the good schooner Star of Freedom, then lying at the Santa Barbara wharf. An extra supply of provisions having been secured by Captain Chase, that thoughtful mariner, shook loose his sails… Captain Chase promised that we would reach Santa Rosa in four hours — if the breeze held out... The property is owned by two brothers, Messrs. A. P. More and H. H. More… It was not until the next day at noon that we were enabled to make a landing at More’s Harbor...”


August 24, 1874 [SBDP]: “The schooner John D. Sanborn, Captain Vasquez, bound on a hunting expedition, is also here, together with the schooner Star of Freedom and Tocacoa, and the fishing smack, Rosita.”


September 3, 1874 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Chase, left here last Friday at noon, with a party of nine excursionists from this city. She sailed to Santa Cruz Island, and from there to Point Conception, and then visited the camping ground of the Coast Surveying Party, about twenty miles north of that place. Here a cargo of supplies for Captain Greenwell and his men was landed, and after a short tour for observation on the shore, the excursionists set sail again. Before returning, the party caught a large number of fish called bonita, and gave a barrel of them to Captain Chase, who salted them down…”


March 24, 1875 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed today with a gang of sheep-shearers for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 14, 1875 [SBDP]: “On shore. The schooner Star of Freedom came along side the wharf this morning and landed the 12 cases of sea lions which were captured during the week.”


June 16, 1875 [LAH]: “On the schooner Star of Freedom, which arrived yesterday morning, there were seventeen sea lions, all alive and feeding well; of the number eight were males, four females, and the remainder were cubs. The heaviest one weighs about 1,000 pounds and is a fine looking monster; the others vary from 200 and upwards, and the whole is the finest lot of sea lions ever captured on this coast. About eight days ago Col. Hudson chartered the schooner Star of Freedom, and having secured the services of twelve men, started for San Nicolas Island where two were captured. At Santa Cruz Island, however, the catch of the remainder was made — one of the largest hauls on the coast. The undertaking was a dangerous one, as the lions were very fierce, and can only be captured by lassoos. These lions will be shipped on cars for the East under the charge of Col. Hudson. The attempt to catch these lions was a great undertaking, but the will-power of the Colonel triumphed. Our Eastern friends will now have an opportunity to see some of the herculean monsters of the Pacific Ocean.”


June 18, 1875 [SBDP]:Star of Freedom. The schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, master, sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 23, 1875 [SBDP]: “The schooner Matinee, Thompson, master, and the schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, master, came into port yesterday — the former from San Miguel Island and the latter from Santa Cruz.”


July 14, 1875 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


July 19, 1875 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 10, 1875 [SBDN]: “In the channel. Schooners Cassie Hayward and Star of Freedom, and United States steamers Hassler and Shubrick, were lying in the offing yesterday.”


August 11, 1875 [SBDN]: “At the wharf. The schooners Cassie Hayward and Star of Freedom were the only vessels at the wharf yesterday.”


August 14, 1875 [SBDN]: “In the harbor. The schooner Star of Freedom, and the constant Hassler were in port yesterday.”


August 15, 1875 [SBDN]: “In the harbor. The schooner Star of Freedom, and the constant Hassler were in port today.”


August 16, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Hassler and Star of Freedom had the channel all to themselves yesterday.”


September 6, 1875 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, with a fishing party on board, returned from Santa Cruz Island on Saturday evening. Plenty of fish and fine sport is reported on the other side of the channel.”


September 15, 1875 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island came into port last night.”


October 2, 1875 [SBDP]: “A sojourn in California… Having concluded to visit Santa Cruz Island by permission of its superintendent, we engaged a passage over on board of the small schooner Star of Freedom, of only 24 tons burden, which sails frequently on business of the island company, from the port of Santa Barbara. She is commanded by Captain Chase, who is quite young but has rounded Cape Horn on several voyages, and requires a crew of only two or three other sailors…”


October 28, 1875 [SBDP]: “The schooners Matinee and Star of Freedom arrived here from the islands last night.”


November 25, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Rosa Island last evening.”


December 1, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Newton Booth and Star of Freedom were the only vessels in the offing yesterday.”


December 6, 1875 [SBDN]: “The U. S. steamer Hassler from Santa Monica and the Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island, arrived yesterday.”


December 13, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday.”


December 18, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom went over to the islands yesterday.”


December 24, 1875 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom went over to the islands yesterday.”


January 3, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from the islands last Saturday.”


January 8, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom took quite a party of excursionists to the islands yesterday. We fear the rain storm spoiled their fun.”


January 19, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom left for More’s Landing today for a cargo of supplies for Santa Rosa Island.”


January 25, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom sailed hence for Lower California via Santa Cruz Island today.”


January 25, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom carried over to Santa Cruz Island yesterday a coop of wild turkeys sent here from Louisiana for and at the expense of the Santa Cruz Island Company. The turkeys will be let loose on the island for the purpose of acclimatizing the kind and stocking the country therewith.”


January 25, 1876 [SBDN]: “In Sunday’s issue of the Daily News I find a slight mistake about the importation of a number of wild turkey’s from Illinois, by James Gamble, Superintendent of the Western Union Telegraph, and that said turkeys were to be placed on Santa Cruz Island. The facts are as follows:

That the Santa Cruz Island Company imported one dozen wild turkeys, which were expressly caught expressly for that Company in Louisiana and shipped via Chicago and Overland Railroad to San Francisco, accompanied by a special messenger, all that long way, with an expense to the Company of about $400 gold. That seven out of twelve (five died on the journey) of that noble animal are today to be shipped on the schooner Star of Freedom to Santa Cruz Island, and that Mons. F. B. Zogautt, the superintendent of the Santa Cruz Island Company is in town to accompany that game to its place of destination with the view of acclimating the same on the Pacific slope.” R. Breitzman. Santa Barbara, January 24, 1876.


February 22, 1876 [SBDN]: “Arrivals at the wharf last Sunday: the Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island, schooner Reliance from Santa Cruz loaded with 160 barrels of lime and 1200 redwood posts consigned to J. P. Stearns...”


February 26, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


March 1, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from the island yesterday.”


March 4, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with an excursion party that had been spending several days there. The excursionists seemed well pleased with their trip.”


March 5, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom went over to Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


March 11, 1876 [SBDP]: “Shell-hunting on Santa Cruz Island. Placing ourselves in charge of Captain Thomas, on board the Star of Freedom, at 9 A.M. we sailed for the famed island of Santa Cruz… A commodious adobe house, though damp, cold and dusty from long vacancy, afforded us a sufficient shelter…”


March 17, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom brought 44 sacks of wool over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, and it will be shipped to San Francisco today by the Los Angeles.”


March 18, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed hence for the island of Santa Cruz yesterday.”


March 18, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Matinee sailed for the outlying islands yesterday after abalones.”


March 22, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from the island yesterday and brought 30 bales of wool for the More Brothers.”


March 22, 1876 [BowersFN]: “I and my wife, DeMoss, Dr. Yates, and two hands embarked at Santa Barbara on the Star of Freedom for Santa Rosa Island. Becalmed in the channel, we were 29 hours in reaching the island. We were fearfully seasick. Had a fine number of whales that came near our ship. The noise of their spouting was like that of a low pressure steamer.”


March 23, 1876 [SBDN]: “Reverend Steven Bowers and party sailed on the Star of Freedom yesterday for Santa Rosa Island. They will write an account of its geology, fossils, shells, plants, and antiquities which will be published at Washington. It is an expedition of no little importance to science. Mr. Bowers goes thoroughly prepared to make a complete survey of the island.”


March 28, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom made a trip from and to the island of Santa Cruz yesterday. She brought a lot of wool and skins.”


March 28, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from the islands yesterday morning. She brought 18 sacks of wool and 17 bales of sheep pelts. She returned to Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


April 5, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with Tittmann’s surveying party. The schooner returned to the island last evening.”


April 16, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 71 bales of wool. She will discharge her cargo on the wharf tomorrow.”


April 17, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom has brought another large cargo of wool from the island.”


April 25, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from the island and was in the offing yesterday.”


April 26, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


April 30, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


May 10, 1876 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


May 11, 1876 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 30 bales of wool, the last of the present clipping.”


May 23, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Alice, Star of Freedom, and Vision are the only craft in the harbor today, besides the usual mosquito fleet.”


May 24, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Vision have departed, both for the outlying islands.”


May 29, 1876 [SBDP]: “As the Star of Freedom was coming over from Santa Cruz Island on Saturday, a Chinaman who had been employed on the island and was returning to Santa Barbara jumped overboard and was drowned. From the actions of the man, who had been leaning on the rail laughing and talking to himself, it is thought he went overboard in a fit of insanity.”


June 3, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom, Matinee, and Vision were the only vessels in port this morning. The Star of Freedom came over from the islands last night, bringing a few sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 30, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom was lying at anchor in the harbor all day today.”


July 6, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed from our harbor today for Santa Cruz Island.”


July 11, 1876 [SBDN]: “Professor Bell and party returned from Santa Cruz Island on the Star of Freedom yesterday afternoon. They had a very pleasant time and secured a large collection of archaeological specimens, beautiful shells, sea moss and samples of the flora of the island. They were five hours on the homeward voyage.”


July 15, 1876 [SBWP]: “A party of young folks, Professor Bell and others, are planning an excursion to Santa Cruz Island of one week’s duration. They expect to take passage on the Star of Freedom.”


May 29, 1876 [SBDN]: “As the Star of Freedom was coming over from Santa Cruz Island on Saturday, a Chinaman who had been employed on the island and was returning to Santa Barbara, jumped overboard and was drowned. From the actions of the man, who had been leaning on the rail laughing and talking to himself, it is thought he went overboard in a fit of insanity.”


July 8, 1876 [SBDP]: “A party of young folks, Professor Bell and others, are planning an excursion to Santa Cruz Island of one week’s duration. They expect to take passage on the Star of Freedom on her next trip.”


July 10, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Matinee are anchored in the harbor.”


July 11, 1876 [SBDP]: “Mrs. H. L. Perry, Professor A. Bell, and Miss San Louis Anderson will depart on the Star of Freedom tomorrow for Santa Cruz Island. The object of the excursion is to study the flora of the island, and endeavor, if possible, to make some acquisitions in the botanical world. When they return they will bring the results of their labors and report to Professor Lemmon, the botanist who has been in this city for some weeks. The little party will be absent from the continent one week in the interests of science. While on the island they will be the guests of Mons. Joyaux, superintendent of the island. A very pleasant time is anticipated.”


July 11, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Matinee and Star of Freedom are still in the harbor. The latter will sail for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow evening.”


July 16, 1876 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed from our harbor today for Santa Cruz Island... Mutton in Santa Barbara is selling from 3 to 8 cents a pound.”


July 20, 1876 [SBDP]: “Professor Bell and party returned from Santa Cruz Island on the Star of Freedom yesterday afternoon. They had a very pleasant time and secured a large collection of archaeological specimens, beautiful shells, sea moss and samples of the flora of the island. They were five hours completing the home voyage.”


July 21, 1876 [SBDP]: “Santa Cruz — for a week… As to the passage to and fro, we made it on board a fine little craft under command of Captain Thomas, as genial and jolly ‘old salt’ as can be met… I recommend all who desire try ‘a life on the ocean wave’ to betake themselves to the Star of Freedom…”


August 1, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Thomas, arrived in port yesterday afternoon loaded with wood, from Santa Barbara, and will discharge and undergo some repairs here. [San Diego World, 28th.]


August 19, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Matinee were in the harbor today.”


September 4, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Matinee has been sold to parties in San Francisco, and will hereafter be under the command of our old friend, Captain G. W. Chase, formerly of the Star of Freedom. Captain Frank Thompson, who pulls down a pennant on the Matinee, is a No. 1 sailor, and wherever he may go we wish him well.”


September 13, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left this morning for Santa Cruz Island with an excursion party on board.”


October 10, 1876 [SBDP]: “The United States Coast Survey steamer Hassler and the schooner Star of Freedom were in the harbor this morning.”


October 17, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Matinee were in the harbor last evening.”


October 18, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Matinee sailed for the islands yesterday.”


October 28, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom and the Coast Survey steamer Hassler were in the offing this morning.”


November 9, 1876 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Cygnet were at anchor in the offing this morning.”


January 3, 1877 [SBDP]: “This morning a large party of ladies and gentlemen from the Arlington, numbering about forty, went out for a sailing and fishing expedition in the Star of Freedom. They were well supplied with lunch baskets and fishing tackle.”


January 4, 1877 [SBDP]: “The fishing party yesterday was very successful. Eleven large bonitas were hooked and landed, weighing together over two hundred pounds. The hearty expressed great satisfaction with their trip and admiration of the schooner [Star of Freedom] and her captain.”


January 13, 1877 [SBDP]: “Captain Thomas of the Star of Freedom, hoisted his signal for sailing this morning, and concluded to start for the islands. He will return next week, and will be ready for some more fishing parties.”


March 2, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in port this morning from the Island of Santa Cruz.”


April 17, 1877 [SBDP]: “Captain C. Thomas, of the Star of Freedom, arrived in port from the islands this morning, and will leave again tomorrow morning for the islands, taking with him a reinforcement of butchers.”


May 11, 1877 [SBDP]: “Captain Mullett of San Francisco, who, two years ago caught several fine sea lions and sent them to New York and London, has engaged the Star of Freedom to go to the islands on another similar expedition. He intends capturing with a lasso, some twenty-five or thirty more and sending them to the same destinations. He expects to start on Tuesday morning and will take with him some fifteen men. The lions when captured will be landed here and transferred to a steamer for San Francisco, and from there they will go overland to New York, and be shipped thence to Europe. Captain Mullett has been a very successful seal hunter and thoroughly understands the business.”


May 21, 1877 [SBDP]: “Captain Mullett left the harbor this morning on board the schooner Star of Freedom, which he has chartered for his sea lion hunt. Captain Thomas commands the ship. Fifteen men are employed by Captain Mullett on this expedition.”


May 26, 1877 [SBDP]: “This morning Captain Mullett returned from his expedition after sea lions, having succeeded in capturing twenty-four of them, which he states are the finest that have been caught. The schooner Star of Freedom, which was chartered for the hunt, arrived at the wharf at noon today with the lions on board. On arrival, they were transferred to the wharf, whence they will be shipped per steamer for Europe accompanied by Captain Mullett. George Nidever, who had charge of the expedition, displayed some splendid seamanship in surfing the boats — finer the Captain says he never saw. The schooner was only four days out, having left here Tuesday morning last and arrived near the lighthouse last evening. The sea lions are looked upon as quite a curiosity in the Eastern States and Europe, as they belong strictly to the Pacific Ocean. Captain Mullett succeeded in capturing a female with a cub, a rare occurrence, and it is a valuable specimen. The greater portion of the lions show the effects of the capture, being somewhat scratched, proving that it is no job to handle these monsters, the largest of which measures six feet in length and weighs 400 pounds. One fully as large made an effort for freedom, and managed to break his cage while the men were getting him aboard the schooner, and escaped into the sea. They differ, according to their age from a dark brown to a dun color.”


May 26, 1877 [SBDP]: “A rumor was circulated on the street this morning to the effect that the schooner Star of Freedom and More’s Wharf were burned and Captain Thomas and crew were drowned. The rumor, which is entirely without foundation, is supposed to have originated in the fact that Captain Mullett and men who had been catching sea lions arrived in one of the schooner’s boats, the schooner itself being becalmed on the other side of the lighthouse. Captain Mullett left the schooner this morning with captain and all hands in good health.”


May 31, 1877 [SCICo]: “Mr. H. H. More: As I have already notified you in writing, you cannot have the use of the schooner [Star of Freedom] for any further trips... If it be necessary for you to have transportation to Santa Rosa Island, you must secure it from some other source... I will give the use of the schooner for the one trip for $35., but in no way obligate myself to this. J. B. Joyaux, Superintendent”


July 17, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the island of Santa Cruz this morning.”


July 17, 1877 [SBDP]: “The schooner Reliance has just been purchased by the More Brothers of Santa Rosa Island, and Mr. Burtis, formerly mate of the Star of Freedom, has been appointed sailing master. Mr. Burtis is well known as a thorough seaman, and the owners have made a good move in securing his services. She takes her first trip today, under new management, on a sea lion hunt.”


August 3, 1877 [SBDP]: “The schooners Reliance and Star of Freedom are in port.”


August 11, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, on its last trip to Santa Cruz Island, made the trip across the channel in two and a half hours, a distance of 28 miles.


August 21, 1877 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom had, early this morning, shaken out her sails and started for the Island of Santa Cruz, but was suddenly becalmed a few hundred yards out, where she lay for over two hours with her sails flapping against the mast. At about noon a slight breeze sprang up again, the schooner’s sails filled, and she started off on her trip across the channel.”


August 30, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is in port again.”


September 4, 1877 [SBDP]: “Mons. De Cessac, a noted French philosopher and savant, arrived here last evening. He arrived at San Francisco in company with Mons. A. Pinart, on board the French man-of-war Magicieme. Mons. Pinart will arrive here in the course of the week. They are sent out by the French government to investigate the geology, etc., of Santa Cruz Island and the adjacent islands, and it is very probable that they will make a thorough examination of the Santa Ynez range of mountains. Mons. De Cessac will leave for the island on Thursday next by the schooner Star of Freedom. Their researches are expected to occupy from two to three months.”


September 7, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left this afternoon for the island with the French flag flying at half mast on account of the death of the late ex-President A. Thiers.”


September 25, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is at anchor in the harbor.”


September 26, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the island of Santa Cruz yesterday afternoon.”


October 1, 1877 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Reliance are in the harbor today.”


October 3, 1877 [SBDN]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the island of Santa Cruz yesterday.”


November 3, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands this morning.”


November 15, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in port yesterday with her bowsprit broken. She had encountered rough weather coming up the coast, and was obliged to put in here for repairs. She sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


December 13, 1877 [SBDP]: “Departures. December 3. Schooner Star of Freedom, [Captain] Chase, for islands.


December 15, 1877 [SBDP]: “The United States Coast Survey steamer McArthur from the channel, and the schooner Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island, are expected to arrive this afternoon.”


December 24, 1877 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Thomas, is in port.”


January 6, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom and the Surprise are riding at anchor in the channel.”


January 19, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and the Matinee ride quietly at anchor in the harbor.”


January 29, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came in this morning.”


February 5, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and H. W. Almy still lie at anchor in the harbor.”


February 6, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom spread her sails and left port yesterday afternoon.”


February 11, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Matinee and Star of Freedom are in port.”


February 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left port this morning carrying fresh vegetables to Santa Cruz Island.”


February 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “Captain Thomas of the Star of Freedom reports a terrific rain storm at Santa Cruz Island night before last. The creek running through the canyon became so flooded that it rose nearly ten feet higher than its usual depth, and went roaring down to the sea in a restless torrent. Huge rocks, weighing from two to three tons, were carried down from the canyon, and emptied into the ocean; fences and all other frail structures in its path were swept away; and an old Indian burial ground on the beach, said to be three hundred years old, was completely washed out so that not a vestige remains. The house in which the men lived was fortunately on sufficiently high ground to save it from destruction, but it was flooded with water and made untenable, forcing the occupants to seek another shelter. No material damage was done, however, and upon the water subsiding the men returned to their house. As the rainfall here was not unusually great, it is probable that Santa Cruz was visited by a friendly waterspout, that strove to make itself at home, if it had to turn everybody else out of doors to do it.”


February 19, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Matinee and Star of Freedom are both in port.”


February 21, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is in port.”


February 28, 1878[SBDP]: “Flood on Santa Cruz Island. Captain Thomas of the Star of Freedom reports a terrific rain storm at Santa Cruz Island night before last. The creek running through the canyon became so flooded that it rose nearly ten feet higher than its usual depth, and went roaring down to the sea in a resistless torrent. Huge rocks, weighing from two to three tons, were carried down from the canyon, and emptied into the ocean; fences and all other frail structures in its path were swept


February 28, 1878[SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left port this morning before a spanking breeze.”


March 4, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Matinee both arrived in port yesterday, the latter bringing a load of abalone shells from the islands.”


March 6, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left for Santa Rosa Island today, taking provisions.”


March 12, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is in port.”


March 18, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Helen W. Almy are in port.”


March 20, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is taking a load of freight that arrived by the Ancon for Santa Cruz Island.”


March 25, 1878 [SBDP]: “Some forty men left today by the Star of Freedom for Santa Cruz, engaged by Mr. Joyaux as sheep-shearers. At least thirty-five of them are voters, and that makes it bad for somebody.”


April 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came in yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with forty bales of wool and a lot of hides and pelts.”


April 23, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived today from Santa Cruz Island with a number of sheep shearers on board.”


April 29, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island Saturday afternoon.”


May 4, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived today from Santa Cruz Island.”


May 13, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom having left Rogers & Co. sealing party on San Miguel Island, returned here last night.”


May 17, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived this morning.”


June 3, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed today for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 17, 1878 [SBDP]: The Star of Freedom brought a load of wool and abalone shells from Catalina Island.”


June 22, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived last night from Anacapa Island.”


June 22, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom last night brought a half-dozen wild-looking common black sheep for butcher’s meat from Anacapa Island.”


July 10, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


July 12, 1878 [SBDP]: “Captain Thomas with his schooner Star of Freedom has gone after Fred Forbush and his blubber.”


July 13, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is expected to arrive tomorrow night with E. F. Rogers’s seal oil party.”


July 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from San Miguel Island last evening. She brought over Fred Forbush’s sealing party and the following freight consigned to E. F. Rogers: 1200 gallons of seal oil, 35 barrels and 60 sacks of an excellent quality of abalone shells.”


July 25, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in port this morning with a cargo of fish and oil.”


August 12, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in port yesterday.”


August 14, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom will leave for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow morning.”


August 15, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 20, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left for the islands last night.”


August 22, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in port this morning from the islands with a load of seventy-five sacks of dried fish and abalones.”


August 24, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, which sails for Santa Cruz Island on Monday, will return immediately with Mr. J. B. Joyaux, who will take back with him to the island a number of sheep shearers. Shearing will begin next week.”


August 26, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from the east end of Santa Cruz Island instead of San Francisco as reported.”


August 26, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom will sail for Santa Cruz Island this evening.”


August 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom will leave for Santa Cruz Island on Monday next.”


August 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom will take twenty-five sheep-herders to Santa Cruz Island on Monday.”


August 30, 1878 [SBDP]:Star of Freedom will take 25 sheep shearers to Santa Cruz Island on Sunday.”


September 7, 1878 [SBWP]: “The Star of Freedom will take twenty-five sheep-shearers to Santa Cruz Island on Monday.”


September 25, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thomas, arrived in port last night from San Francisco.”


September 26, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from the east end of Santa Cruz Island, instead of San Francisco as reported.”


October 5, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the bay yesterday afternoon about 4 o’clock from Prisoners’ Harbor bringing the shearers from Santa Cruz Island. She was 33 hours making the passage. No wind.”


October 8, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived at her anchorage from Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday afternoon.”


October 10, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


October 12, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from Prisoners’ Harbor with Superintendent Joyaux in the cabin and six passengers in the steerage. She brought thirty bales of wool.”


October 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday afternoon for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


October 17, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, which started for Santa Cruz Island on Tuesday, did not have to put back on account of wind blowing in the channel, but on account of no wind. She raised her anchor and drifted around, nearly striking the wharf, then dropped it again, and concluded to wait until yesterday morning, when, with a light breeze, she up canvass and cleared in good spirits.”


October 18, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island, Captain Thomas reports no wind in the channel, but a heavy sea running, probably from an easterly wind from the Santa Clara Valley.”


October 22, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Prisoners’ Harbor this afternoon, two days and one night on the way. Captain Thomas reports no wind at all, and weather as hot as he ever saw it in the channel. The schooner brought over three passengers, but no freight.”


October 24, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom had to resort to oars today to get out into the channel as there was no wind to fill the sails.”


October 31, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 4, 1878 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is loading with barley for the island.”


November 7, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island with 200 sacks of barley.”


November 11, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


November 13, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island, and sailed again this morning for the same place.”


November 16, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed this afternoon for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “The government steamer McArthur and schooner Star of Freedom were riding at anchor in the harbor today.”


December 6, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for San Pedro this morning with 106 casks of wine consigned to Los Angeles. The shipment is made by Grodona and will probably be distilled there, an industry that might be made to pay in Santa Barbara.”


December 28, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived last night from San Pedro, via the Santa Cruz Island. She has been repainted and overhauled, and looks as good as new.”


December 30, 1878 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is taking on her load and will probably sail for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow.”


January 4, 1879 [SBDP]: “Captain Thomas, so long and favorably known among us as commander of the Star of Freedom, has been superceded in command of that vessel by a new skipper. This is done, it is understood, to reduce expenses, as the new man is willing to work for reduced pay…”


January 11, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Prisoners’ Harbor with a load of dried fish.”


February 17, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday morning.”


March 3, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Saturday night from the island.”


March 10, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday.”


March 25, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for the island last night, but meeting a fog bank when only a few miles out, turned back and took a fresh departure this morning.”


April 5, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived this afternoon from the islands.”


April 14, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


April 19, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island today.”


April 26, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in the harbor.”


May 5, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Saturday evening.”


May 7, 1879 [SBDN]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa arrived from the islands yesterday, and are lying at anchor in the harbor today.”


May 9, 1879 [SBDN]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is riding at anchor in the harbor.”


May 13, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


May 26, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


June 30, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom will sail for Santa Cruz Island tomorrow.”


July 7, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


August 3, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, the U.S. Coast Survey steamer McArthur, and the sloop Wam Woo are in the harbor today.”


August 10, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island is anchored in the harbor today.”


August 14, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island today.”


September 15, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom was taking on a lot of sheep shearers today, and sailed for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 16, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for San Miguel Island yesterday with the heavy anchors and tackle to heave off the schooner Prescott.”


October 3, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 15, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


October 29, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


October 30, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom landed a small quantity of wool and dried mutton from Santa Cruz Island at the wharf this morning.”


October 31, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left for the islands yesterday.”


November 4, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands last night.”


November 5, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, with blood in her eye and a pirate crew on deck, left for Santa Cruz Island this morning. She will come back when she returns.”


November 11, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived during the night from the islands, after supplies. On her return trip she will take Mons. Cessac, who goes after a collection of skulls and other Indian remains and relics, which he has dug from the Indian mounds on the islands. The captain of the Star of Freedom reports that it blew a tremendous gale at Santa Cruz Island on Sunday night.”


November 12, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday afternoon.”


November 15, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands this morning, having on board the bones and other Indian relics and curiosities found there by Mr. Cessac.”


November 28, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday.”


November 29, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom, Santa Rosa and Surprise and the steamer McArthur are at anchor in the harbor.”


December 2, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday, but found a heavy sea running outside and no wind, and put back here to wait for a breeze.”


December 3, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom got away yesterday.”


December 8, 1879 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom made the trip from Prisoners’ Harbor to this port on Saturday in 2 hours and 20 minutes. She sailed again for the island this morning.”


December 15, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday. The Phantom, Star of Freedom, N. B., and Surprise were all at anchor in the harbor yesterday.”


December 23, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island today.”


December 29, 1879 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came over from the islands yesterday, and the Phantom arrived this morning.”


January 3, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday. The captain brought over a fine wild turkey gobbler, and reports that the birds now number several hundred and are increasing rapidly.”


January 12, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed yesterday from Santa Rosa Island, and returned again this morning.”


January 13, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 17, 1880 [SBDI]: “Hardly a breath of air was stirring last night or this morning, and the Star of Freedom, which left the islands yesterday noon, was still six or seven miles from land this morning.”


January 19, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday, and the harbor is deserted.”


January 29, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


February 2, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


February 9, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and the Phantom were at the anchorage this morning. The former was preparing to sail for the islands, and the latter will probably sail tomorrow for San Francisco with a load of grain.”


February 10, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left for the islands yesterday, and the Phantom will sail either today or tomorrow for San Francisco.”


February 23, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island, discharged a couple of tons of abalone shells and meat, and put out again for the same island about 10 o’clock.”


March 1, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived Saturday evening from Santa Cruz Island, bringing 50 seal skins and 3 barrels of oil. The captain reports that the hunters who went over there last week were not very successful in the capture of seals, owing to the bad weather, it having rained most of the time.”


March 6, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left this morning for the Island of Santa Cruz, taking over seven tons of freight brought down by the Ancon.”


March 10, 1880 [SBDP]: “The island of Santa Rosa… is a perfect paradise for stock, and has proved to be a bonanza to the owners… The More brothers have made a number of substantial improvements thereon… The schooner Star of Freedom is at present making weekly trips to and from the islands, delivering produce, and it is thought that at no distant day their business will have grown to such proportions as to necessitate the building of a small steamer to ply between the island and San Francisco.”


March 16, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom weighed anchor and gracefully sailed away for the island of Anacapa Sunday afternoon, having on board Mr. Rogers and a party of Californians who are employed to capture alive twenty sea lions...”


March 19, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the channel from the islands yesterday afternoon, where she was obliged to lay till morning, there being no wind. This morning the schooner was rowed up to the wharf. The schooner leaves tomorrow for Santa Cruz Island, taking over a large party of sheep shearers. From there she goes to the island of Anacapa, and will return Monday with the lion hunters and their game.”


March 20, 1880 [SDU]: “The schooner Star of Freedom weighed anchor and gracefully sailed away for the island of Anacapa on Sunday afternoon from San Diego, having on board Mr. Rogers and a party of Californians who are employed to capture alive twenty sea lions. This is accomplished by means of the lasso, but not without much ingenuity and considerable danger, as the lions when their way of escape is cut off, fight viciously, and woe to him who comes within reach of their huge tusks.”


March 23, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived last night from the island of Anacapa with the sea lion hunters, but minus the game…”


March 27, 1880 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island with the Superintendent, Mr. J. B. Joyaux. She is expected back tonight.”


March 29, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived about 7 o’clock last night from the island of Santa Cruz. She brought over 180 lambs and 300 old sheep, which were shipped by Mr. Tucker to the San Francisco market.”


March 30, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left the wharf at noon yesterday for Island Santa Cruz. On her last trip she brought over 20 bags of wool and 25 sacks of abalone shells. She is to return on Friday with 300 sheep to be shipped on the Orizaba.”


April 5, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island, where she goes to bring over about 300 sheep to be shipped on the Ancon on her trip up.”


April 8, 1880 [SBDP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from the Santa Cruz Island bringing 290 lambs, which were shipped today on the Ancon by Mr. Tucker. The schooner returned this morning to the island and will bring over on Monday a lot of sheep to be shipped on the Orizaba Tuesday for the San Francisco market.”


April 12, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with 251 lambs for Mr. Tucker, who will ship them on the Orizaba tomorrow morning. The schooner will return to the island tomorrow.”


June 8, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


June 18, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.” [also SBWP].


June 25, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands this afternoon.”


September 11, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom took some sheep shearers over to Santa Cruz Island today; also a number of men to work on the wharf there which is being repaired.”


October 14, 1880 [SBDP]: “The schooner Surprise, Rogers Bros., owners, from San Miguel Island, lies in the harbor today, also the schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, from Santa Cruz Island.”


November 8, 1880 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Cruz Island last night.”


December 23, 1880 [SBDP]: “From Captain Burtis of the schooner Star of Freedom, who arrived in port last night from Santa Cruz Island, we learn that a large schooner, name not reported, loaded with wharf lumber bound to Wilmington from Puget Sound, has been laying in Prisoners' Harbor for protection during the late storm...”


January 17, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 24, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


February 26, 1881 [SBWP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


March 3, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Cruz Island at ten o’clock this morning.”


March 29, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


April 13, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


May 16, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from the Santa Cruz Island this forenoon, with a cargo of sheep and hides.”


May 27, 1881 [SBDP]: “J. B. Joyaux, superintendent of Santa [Cruz] Island, arrived from San Francisco by the Constantine this morning. He will go to the island on the schooner Star of Freedom tomorrow.”


June 11, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom yesterday brought over from Santa Cruz Island a number of horses for Nick Covarrubias.”


June 13, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island today. A number of Santa Barbarans went over to the island on her to rusticate a few days.”


June 20, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, came over from Santa Cruz Island Saturday night with sheep for I. K. Fisher, and several horses for Nick Covarrubias.”


July 23, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


July 26, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, and returned today.”


August 2, 1881 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, sailed for Santa Cruz Island this forenoon, taking over Mr. Joyaux, Miss Hay and three other passengers.”


August 17, 1881 [SBDP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Burtis, arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


October 19, 1881 [SBDP]: “Miss Hay is expected over from the Island next week.”


October 19, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is in port.”


October 26, 1881 [SBDP]: “Four schooners are in the harbor, the Star of Freedom, Convoy, Surprise, and Santa Rosa.”


November 8, 1881 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, which came over from Santa Cruz Island on Sunday, returned yesterday, carrying Mons. Justinian Caire, President of the Santa Cruz Island Company, who goes on a visit of inspection to his island realm.”


February 16, 1882 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came into port from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


March 10, 1882 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island this morning with 300 sacks of abalone shells and 90 sacks of abalones.”


March 18, 1882 [SBWP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island this morning with 300 sacks of abalone shells and 90 sacks of abalones.”


March 27, 1882 [SBDP]: “Isla de Santa Cruz. Aviso a los vaqueros y trasquiladores. La salida para trasquilar en esta Isla se effectuara el dia ocho de Abril. Los enganchos lo haran el dia cinco. J. B. Joyaux, Superintendent.”


May 31, 1882 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has gone to San Francisco for repairs.”


June 12, 1882 [SBDP]: “A new schooner has come down from San Francisco to take the place of the Star of Freedom on the island route.”


September 22, 1882 [SBDP]: “J. B. Joyaux leaves tomorrow morning on the schooner Star of Freedom for Santa Cruz Island with fifty men to commence the work of sheep shearing.”


February 8, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, that has been laying to in the bay, sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz.”


March 3, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island today.”


March 12, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom has also returned.”


April 7, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is back from Santa Cruz Island.”


May 21, 1883 [SBDI]: “Mr. Cunningham and family, of Montecito, will leave soon on the schooner Star of Freedom for the islands on a camping expedition previous to their contemplated eastern tour.”


May 23, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom started yesterday for the islands with a camping party composed of Mr. Cunningham and family and Mr. Izard. After getting about ten miles out they struck a calm and were compelled to return to spend the night.”


May 31, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Davis, arrived yesterday from the islands and is moored near the wharf.”


June 1, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands today.”


June 22, 1883 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island yesterday. She expects to return today.”


July 2, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom cast anchor near the wharf yesterday, having come over from the islands. She left this morning, and will return tomorrow with a number of spectators and participants for the parade on the Fourth.”


July 7, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for the islands this morning.”


July 11, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom anchored near the wharf last night.”


July 12, 1883 [SBDP]:Star of Freedom sailed for the islands.”


July 23, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is back again from the islands, and took a fishing party out in the channel yesterday. A number of hours of rare sport was enjoyed, and some fine fish were caught.”


August 13, 1883 [SBI]: “The Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived from Santa Cruz Island Saturday, and went back to the island today.”


September 12, 1883 [SBDI]: “Mr. and Mrs. Caire, with two of their daughters, sailed this morning for Santa Cruz Island on the Star of Freedom. They will remain there several weeks.”


September 26, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Anacapa Island this morning and brought 60 sacks of abalone meat and 220 sacks of shells.”


October 2, 1883 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is expected today from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 2, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island last night. She brought 184 sheep for the Santa Barbara markets.”


November 12, 1883 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom was loading freight at the wharf today for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 12, 1883 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom from Santa Cruz Island is loading freight at the wharf.”


November 15, 1883 [SBDI]: “Henry Muller has returned on the schooner from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 12, 1883 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island today.”


December 14, 1883 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom has gone to Santa Cruz Island for orders. Captain Frank Thompson has resigned his commission and will engage in business in San Francisco. Captain Harry Higgins takes command. Captain Burgess takes the schooner Santa Rosa.”


January 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “There were four schooners lying in the harbor yesterday, and today three of them were taking cargoes for the islands.”


January 22, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is lying at the wharf taking on merchandise for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 23, 1884 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom leaves for Santa Cruz Island today with men and stores.”


January 1884: Captain Higgins of the Star of Freedom returned the crew of the wrecked Convoy to Santa Barbara [Morris: 112].


January 28, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom, now at Santa Cruz Island attending to the wants of the island, and the parties thereon, will be back on the first of February.”


February 6, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom on her passage from Santa Cruz last night, lost her mainsail.”


February 6, 1884 [SBDI]: “The security of the islands as against Santa Barbara is illustrated by the wreck of the Convoy and the blowing out of the main sail of the Star of Freedom.”


February 6, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom which was out in the gale last night and lost her mainsail had a rather exciting experience. The wind came up so suddenly that the Captain had no time to reef the mainsail but saved the others. The gust struck the vessel like a cyclone and burst the sail in tatters. The vessel was out in the channel and got the full force of the blow.”


February 9, 1884 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is lying idle awaiting a mainsail to replace the one she lost when caught in open water by the storm of last week.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left this port for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island yesterday, with several Italian laborers and their families, who came down from San Francisco to go into service for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


February 14, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and the Star of Freedom, and sloop Ocean King are still at the islands.”


March 7, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa islands.”


April 1, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom was in port yesterday, having come to the mainland for sheep shears for Santa Cruz Island.”


April 5, 1884 [SBDI]: “A company numbering in the neighborhood of thirty sheep shearers left in the Star of Freedom this morning for Santa Cruz Island for the semi-annual clip.”


April 23, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 110 head of sheep for I. K. Fisher. Today the schooner is taking on a load of wire fencing, agricultural implements, etc. for the island.”


April 26, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom and Ocean King today take from twenty to thirty sheep shearers to the islands.”


May 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa, and the sloop Ocean King are all lying at the wharf.”


May 17, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Thursday night with a party of sheep shearers, many of whom leave for Santa Rosa Island in a day or two, to finish shearing there.”


May 22, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island Tuesday with two hundred head of sheep for I. K. Fisher. The schooner sailed for the island again this morning.”


June 2, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island. From thence she goes to Wilmington for repairs.”


June 24, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island. She has just returned from San Pedro where she has been treated to a new coat of paint, and is now looking very well.”


August 7, 1884 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz yesterday with some passengers for San Francisco.”


September 15, 1884 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island. Her stay in this port was short, as she was to have left for the island this afternoon.”


October 2, 1884 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is expected today from Santa Cruz Island.”


October 4, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom leaves tomorrow for Santa Cruz Island.”


December 6, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom is anchored in our harbor.”


December 18, 1884 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep consigned to I. K. Fisher.”


December 23, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Prescott, came over from the island last night with 150 head of sheep for this market.”


December 29, 1884 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came into port Saturday from Santa Cruz Island bringing a party of island laborers.”


January 3, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday with a cargo of livestock.”


January 7, 1885 [Coroner’s Inquest]: “Coroner’s Inquest, held this day at P.M. upon the remains of Thomas Sansoni, deceased. We the undersigned residents of Santa Cruz Island, County of Santa Barbara, State of California firmly believe and hereby testify that the deceased died from dysentery, caused by eating castor oil beans. His death occurring at 1:20 P.M. on board schooner Star of Freedom about one half mile from Santa Cruz Island whilst being conveyed to Santa Barbara for medical treatment. James B. Prescott…”


January 14, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom this morning was taking on a number of men who were engaged to work on Santa Cruz Island.”


February 19, 1885 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived last evening with a cargo of sheep for I. K. Fisher. The vessel has recently undergone a thorough overhauling and she is now in first class trim, calculated to endure heavy weather if necessary.”


February 19, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz Island bringing 82 head of fine sheep for I. K. Fisher. The vessel has just returned from San Pedro where she was treated to repairs and fresh paint, and now looks as pretty as a new pleasure yacht.” [also SBMP]


February 24, 1885 [SBDP]:Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of eighty fine sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


February 27, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom yesterday came over from Santa Cruz Island with 180 head of fat sheep for I. K. Fisher.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island with a cargo of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 5, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from the islands last night bringing a cargo of fine fat sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


March 12, 1885 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom discharged a cargo of sheep yesterday, consigned by I. K. Fisher.”


March 14, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


March 19, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came over yesterday from Santa Cruz Island. The schooner was to return today, taking over to the island Mr. Blanchard, formerly superintendent, and Mr. J. Caire, president of the island company.”


March 19, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island. She is to proceed to the island again in a day or so.”


March 20, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom leaves tomorrow with a number of sheep shearers.”


March 21, 1885 [SBDI]: “Stearn’s Wharf this morning was a scene of unusual interest, the occasion being the embarking on the schooner Star of Freedom of a large number of sheep shearers who are to be taken to Santa Cruz Island. The mothers, the daughters and the sweethearts were on hand to bid them adieu, and wish them a safe and speedy return. Among their baggage were musical instruments consisting of guitars, violins, banjos, so that it would seem that during their long stay on the island they intend to enjoy themselves. The best of good fellowship prevailed and they all seemed happy and in the best of spirits.”


April 6, 1885 [SBI]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island.”


April 7, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom went over to the islands yesterday.”


April 27, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom is anchored in our harbor.”


May 2, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island last evening.”


May 22, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with Justinian Caire, superintendent of the island. The vessel was to return today.”


July 1, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is moored in our harbor.”


July 8, 1885 [SBDP]: “A number of sheep herders today went over to Santa Cruz Island on the schooner, Star of Freedom.”


July 13, 1885 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


July 21, 1885 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “A rare occurrence, it is noted that every vessel of the Channel fleet was in port this morning: the schooners Santa Rosa, Star of Freedom, Rosita, Angel Dolly, the sloop Ocean King, and numberless fishing smacks and pleasure, sail and row boats. The fleet made a pretty picture, dotting the water in every direction from the wharf.”


September 14, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Santa Cruz Island Company’s schooner, Star of Freedom, sailed for the islands today. She returned from San Pedro newly painted and repaired Friday night.”


October 12, 1885 [SBDP]: “The vessels in port this morning were the Star of Freedom, Ocean King, Rosita, Pirate and a Chinese junk.”


November 13, 1885 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom yesterday took a party of laborers over to Santa Cruz Island.”


December 21, 1885 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in port with a broken windlass.”


January 9, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom went over to the islands yesterday.”


January 23, 1886 [SBDP]: “A Chinese junk arrived in port this morning with a cargo of fish for Sing Chung, making two junks now in port besides the schooners Rosita and Star of Freedom, the latter vessel arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday, for freight brought down by the steamer Santa Rosa.”


May 1, 1886 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came into port from Santa Cruz Island early this morning.”


June 7, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom yesterday took Superintendent Caire and son and daughter over to Santa Cruz Island. The two latter just arrived from San Francisco, and will spend the summer months on the island.”


June 16, 1886 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom is in port.”


June 29, 1886 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom is in port.”


July 21, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Star of Freedom is in port.”


August 5, 1886 [SBDP]: “Justinian Caire, Superintendent of the Santa Cruz Island Company, with his family arrived by steamer from the north last night. The party were taken over to Santa Cruz Island this morning by the schooner Star of Freedom.”


August 6, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Star of Freedom cleared yesterday afternoon for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 14, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom, owned by the Santa Cruz Island Company, has gone to San Francisco for repairs. The sloop Brisk will attend to the island business while the Star of Freedom is on the ways.”


August 25, 1886 [SBDP]: “The waterfront reporter sends in the following: The Ocean King started this morning for San Miguel. The schooners Star of Freedom and Angel Dolly are both at San Francisco for repairs. The Rosita is cruising along the southern coast. The Brisk is in port. The lumber schooner El Nora is still at the dock.”


September 25, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooner Star of Freedom left this morning for Santa Cruz Island, having on board forty men who are to engage in sheep shearing.”


October 19, 1886 [SBDI]: “Schooners Angel Dolly, Santa Rosa and Star of Freedom are in port.”


November 11, 1886 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom is in port from Santa Cruz Island for supplies.”


April 9, 1887 [SBDI]: “Schooner Star of Freedom arrived this morning from Santa Cruz Island. She brought over a cargo of lambs for I. K. Fisher.”


April 14, 1887 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island with cattle on board today.”


May 12, 1887 [SBDI]: “Schooner Star of Freedom yesterday brought over from Santa Cruz Island a cargo of spring lambs.”


July 13, 1887 [SBMP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom, belonging to the Santa Cruz Island Company, now at San Pedro undergoing repairs, is expected back in about a week.”


July 27, 1887 [SBDI]:Star of Freedom arrived in port yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 15 barrels of oil and from five to six tons of seal skins.”


July 28, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has arrived from the islands, bringing fifteen barrels of seal oil and several tons of seal skins.”


August 7, 1887 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom which sailed several days ago for Hueneme for a load of grain for Santa Cruz Island has not yet returned to port.”


September 26, 1887 [SBDI]: “A large number of sheep shearers went over to Santa Cruz Island this morning on the Star of Freedom.”


September 26, 1887 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom returned today to the Channel Islands.”


October 22, 1887 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived night before last from the island.”


October 22, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived night before last from the islands.”


October 23, 1887 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


October 23, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 1, 1887 [SBDP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Sunday evening with twenty-four sheep and forty sheep shearers on board. The schooner Star of Freedom leaves today for Santa Cruz Island.” [also SBMP]


November 2, 1887 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 27, 1887 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.” [also SBMP]


December 21, 1887 [SBDP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left Sunday evening for Prisoners’ Harbor.” [also SBMP]


February 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday morning.”


February 14, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Prescott, left yesterday for Santa Rosa Island with thirteen men and a lot of provisions.”


February 22, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Prescott, left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


February 25, 1888 [SBMP]: “Last Monday evening as a drunken sailor of the schooner Star of Freedom was descending the steps at the wharf to get into a row boat in which he wanted to go aboard the schooner some distance out in the harbor, he fell from the steps into the harbor, but managed to grasp the piles of the wharf. Frank Smith rescued him with considerable difficulty.”


March 27, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for the islands yesterday with thirty-nine sheep shearers on board. The schooner will hereafter be commanded by Captain Frank Thompson.”


April 5, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom yesterday brought fifty head of sheep from Santa Cruz Island for L. Carteri.”


April 7, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Chas. Thompson, sailed yesterday forenoon for Santa Cruz Island.”


April 17, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for the islands today.


April 18, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, left yesterday morning for Prisoners’ Harbor.”


April 23, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom yesterday brought 110 sheep from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman and Ealand.”


April 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island with 110 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


April 26, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor yesterday morning.”


May 2, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz with 150 sheep, most of them for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 3, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


May 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Tuesday night from Santa Cruz Island with 109 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and about 30 sheep shearers.”


May 4, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


May 8, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left Sunday morning for Santa Cruz Island with a supply of provisions.”


May 11, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived from Santa Cruz Island this morning with 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand, and 60 for L. Carteri.”


May 12, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 16, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived from the islands this morning.”


May 17, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived last Tuesday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island.”


May 18, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left Sunday morning for Santa Cruz Island with a supply of provisions.”


May 18, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island this morning with a number of laborers on board.”


May 19, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


May 22, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought over from the island today 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand, and ninety for L. Carteri.”


May 23, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island. She brought 100 sheep for Sherman & Ealand, and 90 for L. Carteri.”


May 23, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left this morning for Santa Cruz.”


May 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


June 1, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from the islands yesterday.”


June 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, will sail this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 9, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from the islands yesterday afternoon.”


June 10, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived last Friday afternoon from Santa Rosa Island.”


June 11, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from the islands Saturday.”


June 12, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island this morning.”


June 13, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 18, 1888 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 180 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and L. Carteri from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


June 23, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, arrived night before last from Santa Cruz Island with 96 sheep for Leon Carteri.”


June 31, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain Thompson, will sail this morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


July 3, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom discharged 75 sheep on the wharf for Sherman & Ealand yesterday morning. She arrived from Santa Cruz Island Sunday afternoon.”


July 4, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning.”


July 12, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island last Tuesday evening with 174 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and L. Carteri.”


July 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “Captain A. Larco came over from Santa Cruz Island on the schooner Star of Freedom yesterday afternoon.”


August 16, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Hueneme to get a load of grain for Santa Cruz Island.”


September 22, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Thursday afternoon.”


October 5, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning.”


October 20, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 85 sheep Thursday evening for Sherman & Ealand.”


October 21, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning.”


October 25, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Tuesday night with 133 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and Leon Carteri.”


November 11, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island with 115 sheep for Leon Carteri.”


November 13, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 20, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 24, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom brought 100 sheep Thursday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island for Sherman & Ealand.”


December 9, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


December 17, 1888 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived Sunday evening from Santa Cruz Island with 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 4, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with a load of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 18, 1889 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Wednesday night with 138 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 11, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 180 sheep.”


June 16, 1889 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom brought 160 sheep for I. K. Fisher from Santa Cruz Island Friday, and returned after more.”


June 18, 1889 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom came over from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with 170 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 3, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island last Saturday evening with 170 head of sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


September 3, 1889 [SBMP]: “Twelve Italians arrived from San Francisco on the steamer Los Angeles Sunday night to work for the Santa Cruz Island Company. They were taken over to the island yesterday on the schooner Star of Freedom.”


October 8, 1889 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 175 sheep for I. K. Fisher & Co.”


November 30, 1889 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Rosa Island with 160 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


January 1, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday with a load of 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


May 16, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with 150 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


June 7, 1890 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning with 145 sheep for Sherman & Ealand and Fisher & Co.”


March 12, 1891 [SBMP]:Star of Freedom, Captain Prescott, has returned from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 25, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom returned from Santa Cruz Island Thursday night.”


April 3, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived last evening from the islands.”


May 6, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with a party of sheep shearers.”


June 7, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island. On her last trip to this city Friday, she brought 154 sheep for Sherman & Ealand.”


July 30, 1891 [SBMP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 4, 1891 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom has arrived from San Miguel Island.”


August 8, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday with several Chinamen, who had been brought from the island charged with sheep stealing.”


August 18, 1891 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived yesterday afternoon from Santa Cruz Island.”


August 23, 1891 [SBMP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island with twenty tons of abalones and shells.”


August 27, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left yesterday afternoon for Santa Cruz Island.”


August 29, 1891 [SBMP]: “Fred F. Caire and Miss Caire of Oakland left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island on the schooner Star of Freedom.”


September 19, 1891 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom got in Thursday night from Santa Cruz Island.”


September 22, 1891 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom sailed yesterday for Santa Cruz Island with a number of sheep shearers.”


October 14, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The Star of Freedom and Liberty are both overdue from the islands, but can’t get here in the present calm.”


November 4, 1891 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


November 6, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island Wednesday and returned yesterday.”


November 25, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The Star of Freedom was expected in from the islands last evening.”


November 28, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa left for Santa Rosa Island yesterday morning, and the Star of Freedom for Anacapa where she will be repaired.”


December 3, 1891 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has gone to San Pedro to get cleaned and repainted.”


January 17, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from San Pedro Friday at which place it was repaired.”


January 17, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has returned from Catalina Island where she has been repainted and cleaned.”


January 19, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has departed for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 26, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived yesterday from Santa Cruz Island.”


January 27, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left last evening with a load of merchandise for the Santa Cruz Island Company.”


February 2, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in from the islands.”


February 11, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


February 11, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 19, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor Wednesday evening from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 15, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in the harbor from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 27, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island with a party of shearers.”


March 28, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, Captain J. G. Prescott, sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning, taking thirty-five sheep shearers.”


April 1, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over yesterday from Santa Cruz Island on Wednesday evening, bringing some horses. They were landed by swimming them ashore yesterday morning.”


April 10, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


April 12, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in from the islands.”


May 9, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from the islands Friday evening, bringing two mules and a couple of cows, landing them in the surf.”


May 9, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday afternoon.”


May 18, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from the islands yesterday morning.”


June 15, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed yesterday afternoon for Santa Cruz Island.”


June 29, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Prisoners’ Harbor, Santa Cruz Island, yesterday.”


June 29, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for the islands yesterday noon.”


July 14, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


August 29, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Santa Rosa and the schooner Star of Freedom are in from the islands.”


October 4, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived from Santa Cruz Island Sunday evening.”


October 25, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has returned from Santa Cruz Island with fifty or sixty sheep shearers.”


October 29, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom returned from Santa Cruz Island yesterday.”


November 2, 1892 [SBMP]: “Schooner Star of Freedom is in from the islands.”


November 4, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for islands yesterday.”


November 8, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday from the islands. After this, Captain Frank Thompson will take command of the schooner in place of Captain James Prescott.”


November 10, 1892 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom left yesterday morning for Santa Cruz Island.”


November 11, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom was taken over to Santa Cruz Wednesday evening. Captain Prescott has left the vessel and Captain Thompson will be master after the first of December on his return from San Francisco.”


November 20, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is in from the islands.”


December 22, 1892 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island yesterday morning.”


December 21, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom with Captain Frank Thompson, brought over a number of sheep shearers who have been employed during the past season on Santa Cruz Island.”


December 22, 1892 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom left for the islands yesterday.”


January 11, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom that has been lying in this port for several days, got up and sailed yesterday afternoon and left for Santa Cruz Island.”


January 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over Sunday evening from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came over yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


February 7, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom returned Sunday to Santa Cruz Island.”


February 7, 1893 [SBMP]: “Mr. Justinian Caire, who came over last week from the Santa Cruz Island on the schooner Star of Freedom, left Sunday night on the Corona for San Francisco.”


March 2, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in yesterday morning from Santa Cruz Island.”


March 10, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday. She is expected to sail for the islands again tonight.”


March 18, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday morning. She sails again tonight for Santa Cruz Island and returns about the 24th for the sheep shearers.”


March 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday and sails again this morning for the islands with 60 sheep shearers. The present shearing promises to be a good one.”


March 25, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sails for the islands this morning.”


March 26, 1893 [SBMP]: “Forty-five sheep shearers left for Santa Cruz Island yesterday on the schooner Star of Freedom. The shearing will take six weeks. The new superintendent of the islands went in charge. The captain of the schooner Star of Freedom received a telegram to await further orders and then leave for San Francisco to take command of the new gasoline schooner purchased by the Santa Cruz Island Company. The boat will arrive here some time this week.”


March 26, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island Saturday morning, carrying sixty sheep shearers to work upon the island.”


April 6, 1893 [LAT]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in from Santa Cruz Island Tuesday morning and landed several horses, tumbling them overboard and running them ashore through the surf.”


April 18, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom sailed for the islands this today.”


April 24, 1893 [LAT]: “Justinian Caire, the wealthy hardware merchant of San Francisco, and chief owner of Santa Cruz Island, has returned from a short stay at his island home, being a passenger on the Star of Freedom on her last trip.”


April 25, 1893 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom left for the islands Sunday with several sheep shearers.”


May 5, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom will arrive from Santa Cruz Island this afternoon.”


May 14, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “Justinian Caire of San Francisco, president of the Santa Cruz Island Company, has had a 40-ton schooner built to run between this port and Santa Cruz Island. The captain of the Star of Freedom has gone to San Francisco to bring the new vessel down.”


May 23, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday from Santa Cruz Island having on board a Mexican, Willie Raynol by name, who had been badly injured by a mowing machine. Both hips were badly lacerated, the flesh being laid open to the bone. He was removed to the County Hospital and medical attendance summoned, but mortification had set in before he could be brought here and he died at one o'clock yesterday afternoon. The funeral will be held today.”


May 26, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom is expected in from Santa Cruz Island tomorrow.”


May 30, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor Sunday and sailed again yesterday for the island. She carried two horses to be used on the island.”


June 4, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom has returned from the islands. She leaves in a few days for the islands with a party of Ventura people who are going on a seal hunting expedition.”


June 5, 1893 [LAT/SB]: “The Star of Freedom has returned from the islands, but leaves again in a few days with some Ventura seal hunters.”


June 8, 1893 [SBDI]: “The schooner Star of Freedom came in last night from Santa Cruz Island with some stock.”


June 9, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom arrived in the harbor yesterday with two horses from Santa Cruz Island.”


June 10, 1893 [SBDI]: “The Star of Freedom sailed for Santa Cruz Island yesterday afternoon.”


June 13, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooners Santa Rosa and Star of Freedom are expected in from the islands today.”


June 20, 1893 [SBMP]: “The Star of Freedom is expected in from the islands today.”


June 24, 1893 [SBMP]: “The schooners Star of Freedom and Santa Rosa are expected in from the islands today or tomorrow.”


May 14, 1894 [SBMP]: “The schooner Star of Freedom, formerly the Santa Cruz Island boat, is now in engaged in the Mexican trade.”


March 3, 1895 [SBMP]: “The schooner Natalie from San Francisco was in the harbor yesterday. The schooner was for years the property of the Santa Cruz Island Company, and was then known as the Star of Freedom.” [At this point, she was a stolen vessel, but this was not know in Santa Barbara!]


March 26, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. The Star of Freedom disappears from its place. The little schooner Star of Freedom has been stolen and is now probably engaged in some smuggling scheme along the coast. The vessel has been missing for two weeks. She has as completely disappeared as if swallowed up by the sea. The schooner is owned by Captain W. Johnson, owner and commander of the Nicaraguan brig, Salvador. Her last sea voyage was from La Paz to this port. She arrived here several months ago, since which time she has been lying on the Mission mudflats in charge of a watchman. Captain Johnson’s wife looks after the craft in her owner’s absence, and some time ago she went to the wharf to see if all was well, but discovered that the Star of Freedom and the watchman had disappeared. Instead of reporting the loss, she waited until her husband returned. He arrived last week and reported the loss to the Collector of the port. Some time ago a man named Bartels desired to charter the Star of Freedom, but Mrs. Johnson would not let him have the schooner. Bartels achieved some notoriety about two years ago when he arrived in this port on the schooner Achilles from Portland, Oregon. A telegram was received by Collector Wise from Portland requesting him to hold the vessel on her arrival, as she had been stolen. A reward was offered for the capture of Bartels and the Achilles, but the reward, although claimed, was never paid. Bartels was not prosecuted either. He said that he was a part owner in the Achilles, and the matter was dropped.”


March 27, 1895 [SFCall]: “Santa Barbara. March 26. The schooner Star of Freedom, reported stolen from Captain Johnson at San Francisco, was here March 17, Bartels in command. The name had been painted out and the vessel rechristened Natalie. Bartels, who is well known here, said he was going south. He was very reticent.”


March 30, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. Nearly two months ago the schooner Star of Freedom was stolen from its anchor in Mission Bay and was taken out to sea. It developed today that the schooner Natalie, which lay near the Star of Freedom, had been robbed of all her ship’s papers and customs-house receipts. The watchman who had been hired to watch the Natalie and Star of Freedom is missing, and it is now supposed that he is one of the pirates. Another man suspected is named Oscar Bartels. Bartels is supposed to have stolen a schooner near Portland, Oregon four years ago. The discovery that the Natalie’s papers are missing explains the recent mystery of Santa Barbara Harbor. The schooner which recently put in there strongly resembled the Star of Freedom, but on her stern-post was painted the word Natalie. It is now certain that the bogus Natalie was the Star of Freedom, and she is probably southward bound, as the Natalie’s papers would give her free entry to any Mexican port. The customs officers think some big smuggling scheme is on foot.”


April 10, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. The man who stole the Star of Freedom arrested. Bartels, the notorious sea captain, is in the clutches of the law at La Paz, Mexico, and is to be prosecuted for stealing the schooner Star of Freedom from this port. The schooner is owned by Captain Johnson, and he left her in charge of a watchman while he went to sea in another vessel. Bartels tried to charter the Star of Freedom, but Johnson would have nothing to do with him. When the owner was away, Bartels bribed the watchman, and the two men sailed away with the schooner. As the vessel could not be cleared, the papers of the schooner Natalie were stolen. The Mexican authorities, not liking the appearance of the papers, decided to detain the vessel. Captain Von Helms, of the steamer Willamette Valley, which reached La Paz today, told the Mexican authorities of Bartel’s piratical act, and wired to Johnson, who sent instructions to prosecute Bartels.”


April 10, 1895 [SFCall]: “Bartels is finally brought up with a round turn at La Paz. Capture of the Star of Freedom by the Mexican authorities. The little schooner, which was stolen from her moorings on the mud flats nearly two months ago, has turned up at La Paz. Bartels, who ran away with the vessel, has fallen into the hands of the Mexican authorities and has about reached the end of his rope. The robbery was one of the most barefaced acts of barratry even known on the bay. The Star of Freedom is owned by Captain Johnson, and he left her in charge of a watchman while he went to sea in another vessel. Bartels tried to charter the Star of Freedom, but Johnson, who knew his past record, would have nothing to do with him. When the owner was away Bartels hypnotized the watchman and the two men sailed away with the schooner. As the vessel could not be cleared, the papers of the schooner Nathalie were stolen… ‘I telegraphed to Captain Von Helms to prosecute the fellow,’ said Johnson yesterday, ‘and will try and have him extradited. I knew that Bartels would come to the end of his rope sooner or later, and I have been looking up the law in the case. It is a clear case of piracy, and the penalty for piracy is death. I don’t know that I shall insist upon the extreme penalty, for hanging is too good for a fellow like that.”


April 12, 1895 [SBDI]: “Bartels caught. The latest exploit of ‘Bartels the Pirate’ in running away with Captain Johnson’s schooner, the Star of Freedom, has probably brought him to the end of his rope. A dispatch was received at the Merchants’ Exchange from Mazatlan yesterday to the effect that the stolen schooner had been detained in Cape St. Lucas by the authorities on account of having irregular clearance papers. The dispatch was signed by Captain Von Helms of the steamer Willamette Valley. He asked for instructions in reference to proceedings against Bartels, who was found in possession of the vessel… The mysterious disappearance of the Star of Freedom created a mild sensation in shipping circles about a month ago. She was anchored near the Mission Flats, alongside the schooner Nathalie, and both vessels were supposed to be under surveillance of a specially employed watchman during their lay-up. Captain Johnson was piloting the brig Salvador at the time and did not know of his loss until his arrival here. Suspicion at once attached to Bartels because of the fact that just a day or two previous to the disappearance he had made an ineffectual effort to purchase her from Mrs. Johnson, wife of the owner… The missing schooner Star of Freedom was first recognized at Santa Barbara, but on her stern she bore the name of Nathalie…”


April 17, 1895 [SFCall]: “Oscar Bartels, who stole the schooner Star of Freedom from this port, has been sent to La Paz for trial.”


April 19, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. When the steamer Willamette Valley arrived yesterday from Mexico, Captain Von Helms was besieged with inquiries regarding the seizure at Cape San Lucas of the schooner Star of Freedom which was stolen from this port several weeks ago. It was Captain Von Helms who recognized the stolen craft despite the fact that she was disguised and was sailing under the name of the Natalie. The captain says that when he arrived at La Paz he learned that the mysterious schooner had been denied entrance there because the papers were not up to requirements. The vessel then attempted to sail away, but was overhauled and detained. The credentials presented by Bartels, in command of the schooner, comprised the enrollment and clearance papers for the Natalie from Sitka, Alaska, and showed she was out on a fishing cruise. There was no evidence on board that she had been doing any fishing, or that she had been fitted out for any such voyage. The papers bore every evidence that someone had tampered with them. The United States Consul at La Paz had been apprised of the fact that the Star of Freedom had been stolen through the San Francisco newspapers, but had no way of determining whether or not the Natalie was really the stolen schooner until Captain Von Helms arrived. The latter’s identification was complete, and when he informed the Consul that Bartels had been guilty of playing similar pranks on previous occasions, it was decided to prosecute him at once, provided the consent of Captain Johnson, owner of the Star of Freedom, was obtained. Johnson sent instructions to Von Helms by telegraph to arrest Bartels. The Consul now communicated with the customs authorities at La Paz, and they had a detachment of soldiers sent from La Paz to San José del Cabo, whither the schooner and crew had meantime been taken. Information had been received to the effect that Bartels and his crew were planning to escape, so an Indian runner was sent to San José del Cabo ahead of the soldiers to warn the municipal authorities to be on guard. The runner covered the eighty miles in twenty-four hours, while the soldiers were three days in getting there. Bartels and his men were imprisoned, and were still under guard when the Willamette Valley sailed.”


April 19, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. Captain Von Helms of the steamer Willamette Valley which arrived today from La Paz, Mexico, states that Oscar Bartels, the piratical sea captain who has a weakness for stealing vessels, is in prison at the Mexican port with two members of his crew. The particular offense on which he is held is the theft of the schooner Star of Freedom from San Francisco Bay. Captain Johnson, owner of the Star of Freedom, has been looking up the record of Bartels and has learned that he is a trader in other people’s vessels to a considerable extent. Bartels stole the schooner Achilles from Seattle and went sealing in her. As a sealer he was successful. He turned over his catch to the Alaskan agents of the Alaska Commercial Company, receiving a draft on Louis Sloss for $2000. Sloss refused to honor it without an identification, and while Bartels was waiting, the owner of the vessel dropped into the city from Ashland, Oregon. Meantime, Bartels had secured $2400 from A. P. Laurentzen, giving him a mortgage on the vessel. The owner got here just in time and he gathered in the money the thief had raised, including the bulk of the $2000 draft. He said he was satisfied, so the charge of barratry was dropped and Bartels escaped prosecution. Bartels next turned up in San Diego and shortly afterward the schooner Dawn disappeared and Bartels was counted as missing. It is now believed that Bartels took the Dawn to Mexico and sold her. About a year and a half ago the steam launch Periwinkle, owned by the Lighthouse Department, disappeared from her mooring at Goat Island. Bartels is credited with the theft, although there is no evidence against him. His Last venture was the theft of the schooner Star of Freedom from this port, which he accomplished by bribing the watchman during the owner’s absence.”


May 16, 1895 [LAT]: “San Francisco. Captain Bartels, first mate Lundison and seaman George Newbert of the schooner Star of Freedom, were all indicted on a charge of grand larceny by the United States Grand Jury today. They stole the vessel in question out of Oakland Creek and reached La Paz, Mexico with her before they were discovered. The United States Criminal Code does not provide for such an offense as barratry, so the lower charge had to be made.”


June 15, 1895 [LAT]:Star of Freedom. The government finds difficulty in getting it here from Mexico. The United States government is having a good deal of trouble regarding the schooner Star of Freedom, which was stolen from this city some time months ago by Oscar Bartels. The owner of the Star of Freedom laid her up in Oakland Creek last summer and went off to sea. When he returned to this city, his vessel was gone, and on making an investigation, he learned that she had been sailed to Ensenada, Lower California, by Bartels. When the owner of the vessel went to Ensenada to take possession of her, however, the Mexican government refused to give her up, and he returned to this city without his vessel. The Federal authorities are determined to secure possession of the vessel at any cost, so next week United States Marshal Baldwin will leave for Ensenada with the necessary papers, and no doubt, the vessel will be turned over to him.”


July 16, 1895 [SBMP]: “San Francisco. Pirates may go free. Extradition papers of the crew of the stolen schooner Star lost. The schooner Star of Freedom that was stolen from the bay about five months ago, is still in the hands of the Mexican officials at La Paz, and Oscar Bartels, Alexander Lundershoff and Peter Newberg, who are charged with being the pirates, are still in a Mexican prison, waiting to be extradited and tried in an American court. It has been three months since the pirates were caught, and Captain Johnson, the owner of the vessel, says he is being put to a great deal of expense on account of the delay. The Mexican authorities are holding the prisoners until the extradition papers arrive, but no one seems to know anything about such documents. Captain Johnson says that he was informed by District Attorney Foote that the warrants had been sent off to the office of the Secretary of State in Washington for the action of the higher officials three months ago, and then all traces of the extradition proceedings seem to be lost. A few days ago, he wrote to Washington asking the reason for the delay, and yesterday he received a reply that no application had been made there for the return of the prisoners or the release of his schooner. ‘Expenses,’ he said, ‘are increasing every day in the vessel, and unless something is done soon whereby I can regain possession of the schooner, the debt on her will be more than the vessel is worth, and for my own protection I will be obliged to abandon all claim on her. This may mean the escape of the prisoner, and Bartels, who has stolen two other vessels and avoided punishment for his crimes, will again be free.’ The Star of Freedom was once owned by Santa Barbara parties, and Bartels, the pirate Captain, spent some time in our city.”


January 5, 1896 [SFCall]: “For want of sufficient evidence to convict, the cases against Alexander Lundisch and Peter Newbert, indited for stealing the schooner Star of Freedom, were dismissed by United States Judge Morrow, yesterday, on motion of District Attorney Foote. The Star of Freedom was taken down the coast of Mexico, and Oscar Bartels, who assisted in running off with her, was some time ago sentenced there to five years in a Mexican prison. An effort by Mr. Foote to have Bartels extradited failed. The conviction of Bartels in Mexico was due to the activity of the American Consul. The Mexican Government returned the vessel to its owner, Captain Johnson.”


June 25, 1911 [NYT]: “What the laws are regarding the modern buccaneer… The Mexican government has imprisoned at La Paz a Swedish-American pirate of the name of Bartel, whose piratical activity extended all along the Pacific coast from Sitka down to the Mexican ports, his most notable exploit being his sailing his pirate ship, the Star of Freedom, through the Golden Gate in the dark. For a number of years he kept English and American cruisers and United States Revenue Cutters busy until finally landed in a Mexican jail under so many charges of piracy that he is likely to spend the remainder of his days behind bars.


December 27, 1911 [SBMP]: “The story of the probable drowning of Charles Linn, a Genoese sailor, published by the Press of December 19, furnished the authorities yesterday the means of identification on the bloated and disfigured body that was recovered by fishermen as they came through the kelp beds in the early morning hours… Linn was about 45 years of age and had been in these parts for 25 years or more. He was formerly with Captain Thompson on the Star of Freedom, and was also employed formerly by the Larcos. Recently he returned from San Francisco, after having been engaged for several years as second mate on lumber schooners. He was an able seaman. He had no family as far as known…”