Difference between revisions of "WILLIAMS, Milo Woodbridge"

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Milo Woodbridge "Woody" Williams, died in Maryland on May 5, 2012 at age 94. He was  preceded in death by his son, Milo Woodbridge Williams Jr.; and survived by his wife of 69 years, Beatrice Elliott Williams.  
 
Milo Woodbridge "Woody" Williams, died in Maryland on May 5, 2012 at age 94. He was  preceded in death by his son, Milo Woodbridge Williams Jr.; and survived by his wife of 69 years, Beatrice Elliott Williams.  
  
 
+
Woodbridge to Carey Stanton correspondence, etc.  [scan and upload]
 
Woodbridge collected on:
 
Woodbridge collected on:
  

Revision as of 15:23, 14 August 2019

Monocacy Cemetery, Beallsville, Maryland

WILLIAMS, Milo Woodbridge “Woody” (1917-2012) was born in Berkeley, Calif. on June 6, 1917 to Milo and Helen Williams. At an early age he developed a love for nature, oceans and marine biology. He entered Pomona College in 1935 but withdrew to crew as quartermaster on a boat called Stranger. They visited the Galapagos and Latin America before heading north to Alaska.

Returning to Pomona, he met his future wife, Beatrice Elliott, and graduated in 1940. They were married in 1943. After service with the Army Air Corps in World War II, Williams studied marine biology as a graduate student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography from January 1947 to February 1948. Scripps has six shoeboxes of his collection of prints and negatives accessioned [92-34].

In 1955 Williams moved to Washington D.C. where he worked for the National Geographic. From 1961 to 1980 Woody settled into a career as photographer for the National Park Service. During this time he was "one of the pioneers in opening the public eye to the last of the great and little known scenic areas of North America," including the newly designated parks in Alaska. After retirement, Woody continued as a freelance photographer and writer, and he was a member of The Explorers Club.

Milo Woodbridge "Woody" Williams, died in Maryland on May 5, 2012 at age 94. He was preceded in death by his son, Milo Woodbridge Williams Jr.; and survived by his wife of 69 years, Beatrice Elliott Williams.

Woodbridge to Carey Stanton correspondence, etc. [scan and upload] Woodbridge collected on:


» Williams, M. W. Notes on Land Snails from Santa Cruz Island in Pomona College Journal of Entomology and Zoology, March, 1940

» Williams, M. W. Jumbo of the Deep [San Miguel Island elephant seals] in Natural History 48(3):144-49, October, 1941

» Williams, M. W. California's Offshore Islands in Pacific Discovery 7(1):16-17, 1954

» Williams, M. W. Santa Cruz: An Island Museumin Pacific Discovery 7(1):18-21, 1954.


Williams took photos loading sheep on SCI in 1939/Smugglers/Main Ranch/Scorpion



Island Collections~
SANTA CRUZ ISLAND
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Santa Cruz Island Woody Williams POM July 29, 1939 POM-250214 Foeniculum vulgare Plants


ISLAS CORONADOS
ISLAND COLLECTOR INSTITUTION DATE NUMBER SPECIMEN
Islas Coronados Woody Williams SDNHM March 30,1946 SDNHM-38829 Elgaria nana Herps
Islas Coronados Woody Williams SDNHM March 30,1946 SDNHM-38834 Aneides lugubris lugubris Herps
Islas Coronados Woody Williams SDNHM March 30,1946 SDNHM-38835 Aneides lugubris lugubris Herps
Islas Coronados Woody Williams SDNHM March 30,1946 SDNHM-38836 Aneides lugubris lugubris Herps



In the News~

May 13, 2012 [The Daily Reflector]: “Milo Woodbridge "Woody" Williams, 94, died peacefully at home on Saturday, May 5, 2012, surrounded by his family. Born in Berkeley, Calif. on June 6, 1917 to Milo and Helen Williams, Woody at an early age developed a love for nature, oceans, and marine biology. He entered Pomona College in 1935 but soon felt restless and withdrew to crew as quartermaster on a boat called the "Stranger." They visited the Galapagos Islands and Latin America before heading north to Alaska. Returning to Pomona, he met his future wife, Beatrice Elliott, and graduated in 1940. They were married in 1943. After service with the Army Air Corps in World War II he studied marine biology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He followed his interests in the natural sciences, journalism, and photography with jobs at the California Academy of Sciences Steinhart Aquarium, the San Rafael Independent Journal, a year in Afghanistan with the United Nations FAO, and as director of the San Mateo County Junior Museum. In 1955 he moved to Washington D.C. where he worked for the National Geographic. From 1961 to 1980 Woody settled into a career as photographer for the National Park Service. During this time he was "one of the pioneers in opening the public eye to the last of the great and little known scenic areas of North America," including the newly designated parks in Alaska. A portfolio of his photos was presented to the Mellon and Rockefeller families and to China's Chairman Mao Tse-tung by President Nixon in 1972. After retirement Woody continued as a freelance photographer and writer. He was a member of The Explorers Club, the American Society of Magazine Photographers, and the Golden Kiwanis. Woody's connection with nature was deep and he used his gifts of seeing and interpreting to share beauty with the world. From the foggy shores of California to the golden Outer Banks of North Carolina he explored, recorded and then gifted us with his vision. With this expansive spirit he led his family to live in large, old, rambling houses. First in Inverness, Calif. and then for 44 years in rural Maryland, he created a home for the family he cherished nestled within the natural world he loved. Woody was preceded in death by his son, Milo Woodbridge Williams Jr.; nephew, David Walton; and brothers-in-law, John Daly and Donald Walton. He is survived by his devoted wife of 69 years, Beatrice; his beloved sister, Constance Walton; sisters-in-law, Edith Daly, and Rosalie Elliott; and daughters, Edith Williams of Greenville, Susan Spaulding and husband, Lincoln, of Rochester, N.Y., Betty Williams and husband, John Holter, of Greenville, Beatrice Williams Ross and husband, Mac, of Jarrettsville, Md.; grandchildren, Sarah and husband, Jeff Lydon, Eric and wife, Anna, and Mary Spaulding, Daniel, Ben and Beth Ross, Amy and David Holter; great-grandchildren Eva and Morgan Lydon; and many dear nieces and nephews. Private service will be held in Maryland at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Sempervirens Fund (protecting Redwood forests), 419 South Antonio Rd. Ste 211, Los Altos, CA 94022, to Stronghold, Inc., (Sugarloaf Mountain), 7901 Comus Rd., Dickerson, MD 20842, or to Spay Today, 4550-B County Home Road, Greenville, NC 27858.”